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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1986
Those who are astonished by the near-victory of Kurt Waldheim in Austria should remember that the Anschluss , the joining together of Germany and Austria in 1938, was greeted with popular enthusiasm by the majority of Austrians who welcomed their compatriot, Adolf Hitler, with open arms. Austria can no longer attempt to perpetuate the charming turn-of-the-century image of Gemuetlichkeit , sweeping romantic Strauss waltzes and Sachertorte in order to attract the tourist trade.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2006 | Christopher Reynolds
IN the last moments before the Los Angeles County Museum of Art unveiled its exhibition of five Gustav Klimt paintings last Tuesday, museum leaders, 90-year-old heiress Maria Altmann and attorney E. Randol Schoenberg gathered several dozen journalists in a plastic tent under pounding rain to review the paintings' history.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2005 | Chris Pasles
Salzburg and Vienna may be dueling for which city will celebrate the 250th anniversary of Mozart's birth next year with more splendor, but the Austrian province of Styria plans to opt out. Styria has declared itself a "Mozart-free zone," Bernhard Rinner, head of the province's Cultural Service, told the APA News Service this month. "It can be excluded at the present stage of planning that Styria will take part in the Mozart Year 2006, propagated by Austrian advertising," Rinner said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001
A federal judge in Los Angeles has ruled that a Cheviot Hills woman can sue the Austrian government to recover six paintings allegedly taken from her uncle by Nazis and kept in that country after World War II. U.S. District Judge Florence-Marie Cooper said that since the paintings by Austrian artist Gustav Klimt were taken in violation of international law, Austria had no sovereign right to try the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor
Austria has petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to stay a federal appellate decision that would allow a Nazi art theft case to go forward in U.S. court. Maria Altmann of West Los Angeles is suing Austria to reclaim paintings by Gustav Klimt valued at $150 million and now owned by the Austrian National Museum. Altmann claims that the paintings, stolen by the Nazis, belonged to her uncle.
SCIENCE
October 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archeologists have uncovered the remains of two newborns dating back 27,000 years while excavating in northern Austria, the scientist in charge of the project said Monday. The infants were buried near the Danube River city of Krems beneath mammoth bones and with a string of 31 beads, suggesting the internment involved some sort of ritual, said Christine Neugebauer-Maresch of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
May 10, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Austria on Wednesday returned a painting by Edvard Munch, called "Summer Night on the Beach," to the granddaughter of the composer Gustav Mahler, ending a 60-year legal battle. The painting, which has hung in Vienna's Belvedere museum since 1940, was handed to Marina Fistoulari-Mahler in Vienna, the museum said in a statement. Fistoulari-Mahler, who lives in Italy, "hasn't yet said what she plans to do with the painting," a museum spokeswoman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2006 | From the Associated Press
An advisory panel handling claims for paintings, sculptures and other items looted by the Nazis during World War II has recommended that 6,292 artworks be returned to their original owners, Austria's culture minister said. Only a few of the requests received through March 31 have been rejected, said the minister, Elisabeth Gehrer, adding that the government usually follows the panel's recommendations.
SPORTS
May 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Austria, a first-round opponent of the United States in soccer's World Cup next month in Italy, tied defending champion Argentina, 1-1, Thursday in an exhibition game at Vienna. Austrian captain Manfred Zsak gave his team additional incentive by announcing before the game that all 22 players would receive an $85,000 bonus in the unlikely event that they win the World Cup. Then Zsak scored a goal three minutes into the game.
WORLD
November 24, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
The far-right surge that catapulted the Freedom Party into Austria's governing coalition in 1999 and sparked consternation throughout the European Union appears to be over, according to polls ahead of today's parliamentary elections. Damaged by feuds and defections, many of them fueled by the backroom machinations of its mercurial unofficial leader, Joerg Haider, the Freedom Party has seen its support plummet, and it seems likely to return to an opposition role.
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