Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAuthors
IN THE NEWS

Authors

NEWS
November 16, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bret Easton Ellis said the first "rumblings" he heard that Simon & Schuster might not release his new novel began last Friday. By Wednesday, Simon & Schuster Chairman Richard E. Snyder had released a statement saying that "American Psycho" was "not a book that Simon & Schuster was going to publish." The book had been under fire in the media because of its lurid depiction of violence against women. Ellis, 26, said he was flabbergasted. "I literally couldn't believe it," he said.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
By the time Charles Dickens' career hit its stride, his serialized stories drove readers to distraction in their eagerness for the next monthly installment. In 1841, Americans crowded the docks in New York waiting for ships arriving from England to find out the fate of Little Nell in "The Old Curiosity Shop. " (It was, sadly, not good news.) Dickens 200 t h birthday was celebrated around the world on Tuesday; it included a breathtaking reading by Ralph Fiennes, who stars in an upcoming film version of "Great Expectations," and a wreath-laying on his grave in Westminster Abbey in London by Prince Charles.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Emma Jacobs
Feedback is everywhere. Not just in the form of professional performance reviews and unwanted comments from your parents, children and partners. Social media and review sites have unleashed the critic in us all. Eating a meal out? Post what you think of the food and waiters on a review site while still at the table. If you are reading this review online, you can leave a comment below saying just how wrong I am. We may not be able to exert complete control over what someone else thinks of us, but we can certainly do something about what we choose to do with the feedback.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The room is No. 206, Hemingway's room. The wallpaper has been changed. So have the furniture, the plumbing, the lights, the lock--everything changed and modernized many times. Everything but the mystique. About twice a month on the average, year in and year out, devotees of the enduring writer and epic character are drawn to Sun Valley Lodge to book his old room and undertake a subtle, personal and sometimes moving journey of rediscovery of a man whose memory lives on here and in nearby Ketchum.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2012 | By Jonathan Moules
What is it about pirates that fascinates us so much? It is not just the swords and swashbuckling (although I have three young sons who would disagree with that statement), since pirates have reappeared in so many guises over the years. In the decades after World War II, the label was attached to rebellious disc jockeys broadcasting rock 'n' roll off the U.S. coast. At the dawn of the present century, it has been attributed to teenage nerds creating websites in their bedrooms to make free music downloads and software available to the masses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
My assignment: Read almost 300 literary biographies in more than 800 pages, all of English-language authors, beginning in the 17th century and ending in the present day. "That's like reading a reference book!" said a shocked friend. Yes, but no: Every entry in "Lives of the Novelists" is written by just one person, British critic John Sutherland, so the book has an internal continuity that makes it read like history, not an encyclopedia. And Sutherland's writing is just plain delightful.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
What do Sugar Ray Leonard, Judy Blume, Betty White, T.C. Boyle, Rodney King, Joseph Wambaugh and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar have in common? They're just a few of the high-profile personalities appearing this weekend at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. Now in its second year at USC, the 17th annual festival offers another robust two-day program of writers and celebrity authors unmatched by any other literary event across the country. More than 400 authors are scheduled to appear in panel sessions and on eight stages set up across USC's University Park Campus.
NEWS
July 18, 1999 | JORDAN LITE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stephen King had written about 700 pages of the novel "It" when he got stuck. He went to bed frustrated, thinking about what should happen next. The answer emerged in a nightmare as scary as the horror story he was writing. King dreamed he was the little girl in the book, trapped in a creepy dump with discarded refrigerators that had leeches hanging inside. One flew out and sucked the blood from the girl's hand. The dream found its way into the novel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books kicked off Saturday with enough books to stock a library (of course), hundreds of authors signing their works and engaging in panel discussions (naturally) and a rousing performance by the University of Southern California marching band. Say what? "People think we just play at football games. But we're doing events all the time," said USC student Anthony Ghavami, who plays the snare drum. "Weddings, bar mitzvahs, corporate events…" "Funerals for alumni," added tuba player Justin Wilburn.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | AURORA MACKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Taylor Rosenberg led a visitor through her opulent home, apologizing for a nonexistent mess. Over there, she explained as she pointed to a long countertop in her House Beautiful kitchen, was where she'd placed her Smith-Corona each morning and pounded out "Mitigating Circumstances," a Ventura County-set police thriller that recently hit bookstores amid a flurry of publicity. Since writing the book, well, housework hasn't been foremost on her mind.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|