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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
My assignment: Read almost 300 literary biographies in more than 800 pages, all of English-language authors, beginning in the 17th century and ending in the present day. "That's like reading a reference book!" said a shocked friend. Yes, but no: Every entry in "Lives of the Novelists" is written by just one person, British critic John Sutherland, so the book has an internal continuity that makes it read like history, not an encyclopedia. And Sutherland's writing is just plain delightful.
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BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Emma Jacobs
Feedback is everywhere. Not just in the form of professional performance reviews and unwanted comments from your parents, children and partners. Social media and review sites have unleashed the critic in us all. Eating a meal out? Post what you think of the food and waiters on a review site while still at the table. If you are reading this review online, you can leave a comment below saying just how wrong I am. We may not be able to exert complete control over what someone else thinks of us, but we can certainly do something about what we choose to do with the feedback.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2012 | By Andrew Hill
Throughout industrial history, managers have tried to use science to analyze, categorize and, occasionally, pulverize the human element in their ventures so they can direct it more easily to their ends. Charles Dickens memorably satirized this desire in the character of Thomas Gradgrind, the utilitarian educationalist in "Hard Times," who was determined to "teach these boys and girls nothing but facts" and "to weigh and measure any parcel of human nature, and tell you exactly what it comes to. " A new book, "Calculating Success: How the New Workplace Analytics Will Revitalize Your Organization," advocates a similarly fact-based approach to workplace challenges.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Krista Bremer's cross-cultural journey began on a North Carolina jogging path, where the one-time California surfer girl met a scientist from Libya who romanced her and swept her away. Bremer, one of the authors at this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at USC, chronicled that experience in a memoir titled "My Accidental Jihad. " The "accident" refers to an unexpected pregnancy; "jihad" (Arabic for "effort" or "struggle") is her way of describing the "effort" of her marriage and of all marriages in general.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
What do Sugar Ray Leonard, Judy Blume, Betty White, T.C. Boyle, Rodney King, Joseph Wambaugh and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar have in common? They're just a few of the high-profile personalities appearing this weekend at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. Now in its second year at USC, the 17th annual festival offers another robust two-day program of writers and celebrity authors unmatched by any other literary event across the country. More than 400 authors are scheduled to appear in panel sessions and on eight stages set up across USC's University Park Campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2009 | Gregory D. Hess, Hess is Russell S. Bock Professor of Public Economics at Claremont McKenna College.
It's not easy being an economist. Dinner parties are a microcosm of the challenges we face. There's always someone who hears what you are, rolls his eyes and takes whatever steps are necessary to sit far from you at dinner. Or else someone will approach and unburden his soul about a terrible economics professor he had in college -- who used too much math, was too little of a humanist and gave him a poor grade which, in turn, kept him out of some top law school. You also usually encounter a junior-captain-of-industry-Alex-Keaton type who tells you about how much he loved that same economics professor pilloried in the previous sentence, and that he would not mind teaching economics when he retires.
NEWS
July 18, 1999 | JORDAN LITE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stephen King had written about 700 pages of the novel "It" when he got stuck. He went to bed frustrated, thinking about what should happen next. The answer emerged in a nightmare as scary as the horror story he was writing. King dreamed he was the little girl in the book, trapped in a creepy dump with discarded refrigerators that had leeches hanging inside. One flew out and sucked the blood from the girl's hand. The dream found its way into the novel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books kicked off Saturday with enough books to stock a library (of course), hundreds of authors signing their works and engaging in panel discussions (naturally) and a rousing performance by the University of Southern California marching band. Say what? "People think we just play at football games. But we're doing events all the time," said USC student Anthony Ghavami, who plays the snare drum. "Weddings, bar mitzvahs, corporate events…" "Funerals for alumni," added tuba player Justin Wilburn.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
By the time Charles Dickens' career hit its stride, his serialized stories drove readers to distraction in their eagerness for the next monthly installment. In 1841, Americans crowded the docks in New York waiting for ships arriving from England to find out the fate of Little Nell in "The Old Curiosity Shop. " (It was, sadly, not good news.) Dickens 200 t h birthday was celebrated around the world on Tuesday; it included a breathtaking reading by Ralph Fiennes, who stars in an upcoming film version of "Great Expectations," and a wreath-laying on his grave in Westminster Abbey in London by Prince Charles.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | AURORA MACKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Taylor Rosenberg led a visitor through her opulent home, apologizing for a nonexistent mess. Over there, she explained as she pointed to a long countertop in her House Beautiful kitchen, was where she'd placed her Smith-Corona each morning and pounded out "Mitigating Circumstances," a Ventura County-set police thriller that recently hit bookstores amid a flurry of publicity. Since writing the book, well, housework hasn't been foremost on her mind.
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