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BUSINESS
December 30, 2012 | By Jonathan Moules
What is it about pirates that fascinates us so much? It is not just the swords and swashbuckling (although I have three young sons who would disagree with that statement), since pirates have reappeared in so many guises over the years. In the decades after World War II, the label was attached to rebellious disc jockeys broadcasting rock 'n' roll off the U.S. coast. At the dawn of the present century, it has been attributed to teenage nerds creating websites in their bedrooms to make free music downloads and software available to the masses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Krista Bremer's cross-cultural journey began on a North Carolina jogging path, where the one-time California surfer girl met a scientist from Libya who romanced her and swept her away. Bremer, one of the authors at this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at USC, chronicled that experience in a memoir titled "My Accidental Jihad. " The "accident" refers to an unexpected pregnancy; "jihad" (Arabic for "effort" or "struggle") is her way of describing the "effort" of her marriage and of all marriages in general.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
What do Sugar Ray Leonard, Judy Blume, Betty White, T.C. Boyle, Rodney King, Joseph Wambaugh and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar have in common? They're just a few of the high-profile personalities appearing this weekend at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. Now in its second year at USC, the 17th annual festival offers another robust two-day program of writers and celebrity authors unmatched by any other literary event across the country. More than 400 authors are scheduled to appear in panel sessions and on eight stages set up across USC's University Park Campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2009 | Gregory D. Hess, Hess is Russell S. Bock Professor of Public Economics at Claremont McKenna College.
It's not easy being an economist. Dinner parties are a microcosm of the challenges we face. There's always someone who hears what you are, rolls his eyes and takes whatever steps are necessary to sit far from you at dinner. Or else someone will approach and unburden his soul about a terrible economics professor he had in college -- who used too much math, was too little of a humanist and gave him a poor grade which, in turn, kept him out of some top law school. You also usually encounter a junior-captain-of-industry-Alex-Keaton type who tells you about how much he loved that same economics professor pilloried in the previous sentence, and that he would not mind teaching economics when he retires.
NEWS
July 18, 1999 | JORDAN LITE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stephen King had written about 700 pages of the novel "It" when he got stuck. He went to bed frustrated, thinking about what should happen next. The answer emerged in a nightmare as scary as the horror story he was writing. King dreamed he was the little girl in the book, trapped in a creepy dump with discarded refrigerators that had leeches hanging inside. One flew out and sucked the blood from the girl's hand. The dream found its way into the novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Anne Tyler has never liked "The Taming of the Shrew. " "I have no favorite moments in this play," Tyler said. "I first read it in college and disliked it intensely, and I can't say my attitude toward it softened any when I read it again just recently. " Very soon, Tyler is going to get a chance to reimagine and make sense of "The Taming of the Shrew. " She's writing a novel based on the play as part of a project by the publishing house Hogarth to commission novels based on all 37 of Shakespeare's plays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books kicked off Saturday with enough books to stock a library (of course), hundreds of authors signing their works and engaging in panel discussions (naturally) and a rousing performance by the University of Southern California marching band. Say what? "People think we just play at football games. But we're doing events all the time," said USC student Anthony Ghavami, who plays the snare drum. "Weddings, bar mitzvahs, corporate events…" "Funerals for alumni," added tuba player Justin Wilburn.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | AURORA MACKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Taylor Rosenberg led a visitor through her opulent home, apologizing for a nonexistent mess. Over there, she explained as she pointed to a long countertop in her House Beautiful kitchen, was where she'd placed her Smith-Corona each morning and pounded out "Mitigating Circumstances," a Ventura County-set police thriller that recently hit bookstores amid a flurry of publicity. Since writing the book, well, housework hasn't been foremost on her mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Joy Press
The fantasy of being a writer appeals to so many of us: sitting in a book-lined study crafting perfectly wrought sentences, which an illustrious publisher swiftly transforms into a bestselling book and an indelible literary legacy. Missing from that idealized image is - well, the reality. Most writers struggle and stumble at every stage. It's hard to start a manuscript and harder to finish it. Rejection is rampant. And finding a way to earn a living that allows time to write - that can be the toughest trick of all. The Times sent out a survey to authors participating in the Festival of Books with questions about their experience as writers and got more than 200 responses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Strolling down an aisle with hands clasped behind his back at the fourth annual Leimert Park Village Book Fair, Otis Wright noticed significant changes in the event as it unfolded Saturday in a neighborhood known as the cultural heartbeat of black Los Angeles. Like similar literary festivals across the nation, the fair featured fiction, nonfiction, poetry and children's literature by 150 African American writers, as well as readings, panel discussions and performances by singers, including a Lena Horne impersonator.
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