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BUSINESS
September 1, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a shortage of a key ingredient and instability in energy markets, Chevron Corp. confirmed that it has postponed the introduction of a cleaner-burning gasoline in three metropolitan areas. Chevron's lower-emission gasoline--one of many such highly touted formulas recently introduced by oil companies--was supposed to have been rolled out late this summer in Houston, Baltimore and Washington before the company changed its plans a few weeks ago.
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OPINION
January 5, 2002
Re "Big Cars, Shrinking Glaciers," editorial, Dec. 29: Recognition of global warming by the public is a first step and will occur only via the media. Unfortunately, reducing automobile consumption, although helpful, is not enough. Energy consumption and standard of living are undeniably correlated, and the United States is the world leader in fossil-fuel-based energy consumption. Other parts of the world, like China and India, want to catch up. The only answer to global warming (shrinking glaciers)
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BUSINESS
June 26, 1991 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You wouldn't want to buy the Chevy Corsica pictured in the General Motors advertisement that debuted in national newspapers earlier this month. Its front end is crumpled, for one thing, and its body is crisscrossed with decidedly unattractive crash test markings. Inside, three unanimated and apparently uninjured dummies stare vacantly into space, while the fourth, the one in the driver's seat, gazes into an inflated air bag.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1991 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You wouldn't want to buy the Chevy Corsica pictured in the General Motors advertisement that debuted in national newspapers earlier this month. Its front end is crumpled, for one thing, and its body is crisscrossed with decidedly unattractive crash test markings. Inside, three unanimated and apparently uninjured dummies stare vacantly into space, while the fourth, the one in the driver's seat, gazes into an inflated air bag.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Environmental leaders on the toxics and Santa Monica Bay issues said Friday they would campaign to rouse political rebellion against air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin, including an initiative that would impose new regulations on motorists and business hours. Assemblyman Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica) said his political organization of volunteers and celebrities would push an initiative for the 1990 ballot if local officials don't crack down on air pollution.
OPINION
January 5, 2002
Re "Big Cars, Shrinking Glaciers," editorial, Dec. 29: Recognition of global warming by the public is a first step and will occur only via the media. Unfortunately, reducing automobile consumption, although helpful, is not enough. Energy consumption and standard of living are undeniably correlated, and the United States is the world leader in fossil-fuel-based energy consumption. Other parts of the world, like China and India, want to catch up. The only answer to global warming (shrinking glaciers)
NEWS
January 12, 1988 | Associated Press
About 1,500 automobile emissions testing stations will begin operating here this month, the government newspaper El Nacional said Monday. The testing stations are the first ever in Mexico. An estimated 75% to 80% of all toxic emissions in the Mexico City metropolitan area are reportedly produced by the city's 3 million vehicles.
NEWS
March 7, 1985
Canada announced a new program aimed at cutting acid-rain causing emissions in half by 1994. The initiative includes stricter controls on automobile emissions, beginning in the 1988 model year, and the spending of more than $200 million over the next 10 years to curb sulfur dioxide. The acid rain problem is expected to be a topic of discussion when President Reagan visits Prime Minister Brian Mulroney later this month. Canada contends that 50% of its acid rain comes from the United States.
NEWS
August 20, 1986
Air pollution is reducing the yield of cotton, Thompson seedless grapes and other crops in the San Joaquin Valley by as much as 20%, leading smog researchers and government regulators said at a seminar in Fresno. John Holmes, research director for the California Air Resources Board, said the way to stop such losses is to find ways to "live lightly on the land" by cleaning up industrial pollution in the region.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | From Associated Press
In a second significant step toward cutting smog, the state Air Resources Board today adopted rules requiring trucks and buses to be virtually smoke-free by the early 1990s. The reductions are made possible by new emission-reducing technology, ARB spokesman William L. Sessa said at the board's meeting in Los Angeles. On Thursday, the board adopted new automobile emissions standards on nitrogen oxides aimed at a 15% statewide reduction in those emissions. (Story, Page 4.)
BUSINESS
September 1, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a shortage of a key ingredient and instability in energy markets, Chevron Corp. confirmed that it has postponed the introduction of a cleaner-burning gasoline in three metropolitan areas. Chevron's lower-emission gasoline--one of many such highly touted formulas recently introduced by oil companies--was supposed to have been rolled out late this summer in Houston, Baltimore and Washington before the company changed its plans a few weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Environmental leaders on the toxics and Santa Monica Bay issues said Friday they would campaign to rouse political rebellion against air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin, including an initiative that would impose new regulations on motorists and business hours. Assemblyman Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica) said his political organization of volunteers and celebrities would push an initiative for the 1990 ballot if local officials don't crack down on air pollution.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1998 | Bloomberg News
United Parcel Service of America Inc., the world's top package-delivery company, said it will raise rates about 2.5% next year, the smallest increase in 11 years, helped by the lowest oil prices in more than a decade. Separately, UPS said it will test a hybrid gasoline-electric truck starting early next year as it seeks to lower automobile emissions and fuel costs. The trucks to be tested in Los Angeles, Atlanta and Johnson City, N.Y.
NEWS
December 10, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Clinton Administration, seeking to blunt a revolt in some states about new air pollution controls, has agreed to ease its requirements for more stringent and costly automobile tailpipe emissions testing. EPA Administrator Carol Browner promised a group of governors that they would be given more flexibility in meeting the new vehicle-testing regulations as long as overall pollution-reduction levels are met, officials said Friday.
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