Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAutomobile Industry
IN THE NEWS

Automobile Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
AUTOS
July 12, 2006 | Jeanne Wright, Special to The Times
A new bill of rights for California car buyers provides grace periods for used-car purchases, caps dealer compensation on loans and features other provisions that are some of the strongest consumer protections in the country, according to state legislators and consumer advocates. The law, which went into effect July 1, applies to motor vehicles bought in California from a dealer for personal, family or household use.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By James Oliphant
Perhaps the most attention-getting Super Bowl ad - other than that dog blackmailing his owner with tortilla chips to keep quiet over a felinicide, of course - was Clint Eastwood's paean to a resurgent auto industry in Detroit. The ad featured Eastwood leveraging his cinematic persona to the hilt, emerging from the shadows while praising and challenging Americans at the same time. “It's halftime in America too,” Eastwood rasped during halftime at the Super Bowl in a manner reminiscent of the Detroiter he played in “Gran Torino.”  “Seems that we've lost our heart at times.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 17, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ford Motor Co. reported a 15% increase in first-quarter earnings as the nation's No. 2 auto maker benefited from strong truck sales, continued cost-cutting and improved performance in Europe. The record earnings--the firm's eighth consecutive increase in quarterly profit--came despite sharply higher marketing costs. Increased rebates, an estimated average of about $1,100 per vehicle, were offset by $400 million in cost reductions. Overall, Ford posted first-quarter operating profit of $1.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
On a summer day in 1911, Donald MacPherson was driving his Buick runabout to Sarasota Springs, N.Y., when the wooden spokes snapped on a rear wheel, flipping the open car and trapping him under the rear axle. MacPherson suffered a badly lacerated eye and a broken wrist so painful he couldn't grip the tools he needed to ply his craft as a stone cutter. He sued Buick Motor Co., alleging negligence in failing to ensure the wheel was roadworthy. In what would become a landmark ruling in product liability law, the New York Court of Appeals in 1916 awarded MacPherson $5,025 in compensation -- about $115,000 in today's dollars -- and established the automaker's "duty of care" to ensure customers are sold a safe product.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Campaigning within a mile of each other at one point, President Bush and challenger Patrick J. Buchanan wooed Michigan voters Friday with promises to aid the ailing automobile industry. Bush, in a speech to a business group meeting in this suburban headquarters of Ford Motor Co., announced he was scrapping an Environmental Protection Agency regulation that new cars be equipped with canisters to capture gasoline fumes that escape when fuel is pumped into gas tanks.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We offer everything!" car salesmen Gary Starr exclaims, all shirt sleeves and teeth. "CD players, tinted windows, hands-free cellular phone, even power windows. We'll lease you a car. We take trade-ins too, as long as they're electric." As the sharp aroma of roasting espresso breezes along the street in downtown Santa Rosa, past the furniture store and the Omelette Express, Starr, president of Solar Electric Engineering Inc.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After spending nearly 5 years and $24 million to develop an engine technology that it promised would revolutionize the auto industry, Rosen Motors will close its doors on Friday because it couldn't persuade any major car manufacturers to buy into its vision. Launched in 1993 by Harold Rosen, a renowned aerospace engineer, and his brother Ben, a legendary venture capitalist and chairman of Compaq Computer Corp., Rosen Motors aimed to develop a turbine-flywheel powertrain for passenger cars.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
On a summer day in 1911, Donald MacPherson was driving his Buick runabout to Sarasota Springs, N.Y., when the wooden spokes snapped on a rear wheel, flipping the open car and trapping him under the rear axle. MacPherson suffered a badly lacerated eye and a broken wrist so painful he couldn't grip the tools he needed to ply his craft as a stone cutter. He sued Buick Motor Co., alleging negligence in failing to ensure the wheel was roadworthy. In what would become a landmark ruling in product liability law, the New York Court of Appeals in 1916 awarded MacPherson $5,025 in compensation -- about $115,000 in today's dollars -- and established the automaker's "duty of care" to ensure customers are sold a safe product.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foreign Car-Assembly Projects Outlawed: As part of its launch of a program to raise its own industrial giants, the country has banned new-car assembly projects that involve foreigners until 1996 and will tighten controls on car imports. The ban, part of a government initiative called the Framework of National Industrial Policy for the '90s, will focus resources to allow rapid expansion of eight existing car companies, said Ye Qing, vice minister of the state planning commission.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Acknowledging that Chrysler had been "dumb" to disconnect the odometers on new cars being test-driven by company managers before they were sold, Chrysler Chairman Lee A. Iacocca asked the nation for forgiveness Wednesday. "Did we screw up? You bet we did," Iacocca conceded during a press conference at Chrysler's headquarters. "We're human, and sometimes people do some pretty dumb things."
NATIONAL
August 1, 2009 | P.J. Huffstutter
As the unemployment rate topped 25% and General Motors planned to cut more jobs in this long-struggling auto town, voters decided to focus their anger on one person: Mayor Donald J. Williamson. More than 17,000 residents signed a petition demanding his recall, citing waste, corruption, mismanagement and sundry other complaints. Williamson resigned 10 days before the vote. "He made people so mad," said Eric Mays, a retired GM worker who led an earlier effort to recall Williamson that failed.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera and Ken Bensinger
By offering a sweetened deal Thursday to holders of $27 billion of its bonds, General Motors Corp. and the Obama administration are trying to follow Chrysler's path to a quick exit from bankruptcy. As GM rolls toward an expected Chapter 11 filing by Monday, a new, leaner and hopefully profitable Chrysler is preparing to emerge from its own court-supervised restructuring.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2009 | Associated Press
General Motors Corp. said Friday that it had borrowed an additional $4 billion from the Treasury Department, meaning the automaker has now accepted $19.4 billion in loans from the U.S. government. GM started taking government money in December and said it intended to borrow $2.6 billion more by June 1 and an additional $9 billion after that. But in a regulatory filing Friday, GM said it needed $1.4 billion sooner than originally forecast.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2009 | Peter Pae
The major players in a key industry file for bankruptcy protection with the hope of reshaping operations quickly and coming back to compete more strongly. But it's not the automakers; it's the airlines, which just a few years ago underwent a wrenching restructuring in Bankruptcy Court that fundamentally altered the travel industry. Circumstances are different. But with Chrysler's filing for bankruptcy protection Thursday, and General Motors Corp.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2009 | Ken Bensinger
Ford Motor Co. has long maintained that a bankruptcy filing by one of its Detroit competitors could have disastrous effects on it as well. Wall Street seems to think otherwise. With bankruptcy rumors growing ever louder, General Motors Corp. shares have struggled to reach $2 in recent months, falling 33 cents, or 17%, to $1.71 on Monday after a Standard & Poor's downgrade drove its bonds to record lows. Ford, meanwhile, has been steadily climbing, rising 2 cents to $4.26 on Monday.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2009 | Michael Muskal
President Obama on Monday announced plans to cope with the problems facing Detroit's auto industry. Here is a primer of the issue and how it will affect consumers. Why does the car industry have a problem? Essentially, fewer people bought cars from General Motors Corp., Chrysler and Ford Motor Co.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Toyota Motor Corp., Japan's largest automobile manufacturer, said Friday that it will stop using the gases blamed for destroying the Earth's protective ozone layer. Toyota spokesman Anthony McMillan said that by 1995, the company will stop using the gas for cleaning and cooling during the manufacturing process. Toyota used 2,800 tons of CFC during 1988, he said. The Toyota group, which includes affiliated parts suppliers, used 9,500 tons last year, McMillan said. Nippondenso Co.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
A California judge who found that Ford Motor Co. concealed a safety defect in millions of vehicles Friday ordered the auto maker to begin settlement talks, which could avert a statewide recall. Ford faces a recall of 1.7 million cars and trucks that have been owned or leased by California consumers. A settlement could help the world's No. 2 auto maker avoid the recall, and estimated costs of $150 to $170 per vehicle, as well as a new trial that is set to begin next year.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2009 | Ken Bensinger
For six months, General Motors Corp. and Chrysler have been trying to convince the government that they need billions of dollars in aid, while assuring the American consumer that everything is A-OK. It's proved to be the marketing equivalent of trying to stuff a Hummer into the trunk of a Corvette. The negative PR campaign appears to have reached the right ears in Washington. On Monday, President Obama will announce his plan for supporting the two automakers beyond the $17.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2009 | Ken Bensinger and Jim Puzzanghera
Pay a lot now, or much more later. That's the choice General Motors Corp. and Chrysler presented Washington this week as they requested $22 billion in additional bailout money -- and warned that the tab could be many times that should the companies go bankrupt. Despite historic sales declines, critics contend that the automakers' arguments are simply posturing to squeeze more money out of the government and to make billion-dollar cash infusions seem more palatable.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|