Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAutomobile Industry
IN THE NEWS

Automobile Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
AUTOS
July 12, 2006 | Jeanne Wright, Special to The Times
A new bill of rights for California car buyers provides grace periods for used-car purchases, caps dealer compensation on loans and features other provisions that are some of the strongest consumer protections in the country, according to state legislators and consumer advocates. The law, which went into effect July 1, applies to motor vehicles bought in California from a dealer for personal, family or household use.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By James Oliphant
Perhaps the most attention-getting Super Bowl ad - other than that dog blackmailing his owner with tortilla chips to keep quiet over a felinicide, of course - was Clint Eastwood's paean to a resurgent auto industry in Detroit. The ad featured Eastwood leveraging his cinematic persona to the hilt, emerging from the shadows while praising and challenging Americans at the same time. “It's halftime in America too,” Eastwood rasped during halftime at the Super Bowl in a manner reminiscent of the Detroiter he played in “Gran Torino.”  “Seems that we've lost our heart at times.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 17, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ford Motor Co. reported a 15% increase in first-quarter earnings as the nation's No. 2 auto maker benefited from strong truck sales, continued cost-cutting and improved performance in Europe. The record earnings--the firm's eighth consecutive increase in quarterly profit--came despite sharply higher marketing costs. Increased rebates, an estimated average of about $1,100 per vehicle, were offset by $400 million in cost reductions. Overall, Ford posted first-quarter operating profit of $1.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2010 | Jerry Hirsch
U.S. automakers, which have long battled perceptions of poor craftsmanship in their cars, edged out imports in a key benchmark of quality for the first time in nearly a quarter century. Led by improvements at Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Co., the domestic industry topped J.D. Power & Associates' latest initial quality study — something that has never happened before in the survey's 24 years. The Toyota brand, a perennial star in the survey, plunged below average as it has struggled with massive recalls.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Campaigning within a mile of each other at one point, President Bush and challenger Patrick J. Buchanan wooed Michigan voters Friday with promises to aid the ailing automobile industry. Bush, in a speech to a business group meeting in this suburban headquarters of Ford Motor Co., announced he was scrapping an Environmental Protection Agency regulation that new cars be equipped with canisters to capture gasoline fumes that escape when fuel is pumped into gas tanks.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We offer everything!" car salesmen Gary Starr exclaims, all shirt sleeves and teeth. "CD players, tinted windows, hands-free cellular phone, even power windows. We'll lease you a car. We take trade-ins too, as long as they're electric." As the sharp aroma of roasting espresso breezes along the street in downtown Santa Rosa, past the furniture store and the Omelette Express, Starr, president of Solar Electric Engineering Inc.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2010 | By Ken Bensinger
Toyota Motor Corp. officials took credit for saving hundreds of millions of dollars by persuading federal regulators to limit or avoid safety recalls and rules, a company document released Sunday shows. The document, an internal company presentation, depicts an automaker focused on getting what it termed "favorable recall outcomes" from regulators, with a goal of saving money even as the death toll climbed from accidents in which Toyota vehicles accelerated uncontrollably. The presentation by executives in the company's Washington, D.C., office was addressed to Yoshimi Inaba, Toyota's top U.S. executive, and dated July 6, 2009 -- months before the sudden-acceleration problem was widely known outside Toyota and the federal highway regulatory agency.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2007 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
From "Animal House" to "Entourage," reverse-opening car doors have long been Hollywood code for cool. Automakers have once again gotten the message about "suicide doors" -- though you're not likely to see that phrase in any advertising campaigns. After all but disappearing from car design in the 1970s, the distinctive clamshell-style doors are staging a comeback, led by popular vehicles such as the Honda Element and the Toyota FJ Cruiser.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheng Ingram is a believer in aluminum-block engines, thanks to his 1987 Acura Integra, which has clocked more than 200,000 miles without a major repair. "Believe me, motorists can put their trust in an aluminum engine--at least Honda's," Ingram says, referring to the Japanese maker of the Acura luxury line. "Mine is running great and needs less than a half-quart of oil between oil changes every 4,000 miles." But not everybody with aluminum engines is so enamored.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Ken Bensinger
The sleek Infiniti G37 Cindy Marsh bought last August was the car of her dreams, equipped with the latest keyless electronics technology that allows her to start the engine with the touch of a button. But right away, the system gave her trouble. To get the engine started, she would sometimes have to tap the power button repeatedly. Sometimes it wouldn't start unless she opened and closed the car doors, Marsh recalled. She eventually adapted to the system's quirks but said that even now she isn't sure how to shut off the engine in an emergency.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
On a summer day in 1911, Donald MacPherson was driving his Buick runabout to Sarasota Springs, N.Y., when the wooden spokes snapped on a rear wheel, flipping the open car and trapping him under the rear axle. MacPherson suffered a badly lacerated eye and a broken wrist so painful he couldn't grip the tools he needed to ply his craft as a stone cutter. He sued Buick Motor Co., alleging negligence in failing to ensure the wheel was roadworthy. In what would become a landmark ruling in product liability law, the New York Court of Appeals in 1916 awarded MacPherson $5,025 in compensation -- about $115,000 in today's dollars -- and established the automaker's "duty of care" to ensure customers are sold a safe product.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2010 | By Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian
Federal regulators in 2007 asked Toyota Motor Corp. to consider installing software to prevent sudden acceleration in its vehicles after receiving complaints that vehicles could race out of control, company documents show. Yet the automaker began installing the safety feature, known as brake override, only this January after a widely publicized accident involving a runaway Lexus ES that killed four people near San Diego. Safety regulators acknowledged late last week that they pressured Toyota anew last fall to consider the override software in the wake of that crash, which set off a chain of events leading the company to issue nearly 10 million recall notices worldwide.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Ken Bensinger
Apologizing for Toyota's missteps in dealing with defects blamed in dozens of fatalities, a contrite Akio Toyoda told members of Congress that his company's rapid growth had "confused" the priority it places on safety. "Quite frankly, I fear the pace at which we have grown may have been too quick," the president of Toyota Motor Corp. said during more than three hours of testimony. "I regret that this has resulted in the safety issues described in the recalls we face today, and I am deeply sorry for any accidents that Toyota drivers have experienced."
BUSINESS
February 22, 2010 | By Ken Bensinger
Toyota Motor Corp. officials took credit for saving hundreds of millions of dollars by persuading federal regulators to limit or avoid safety recalls and rules, a company document released Sunday shows. The document, an internal company presentation, depicts an automaker focused on getting what it termed "favorable recall outcomes" from regulators, with a goal of saving money even as the death toll climbed from accidents in which Toyota vehicles accelerated uncontrollably. The presentation by executives in the company's Washington, D.C., office was addressed to Yoshimi Inaba, Toyota's top U.S. executive, and dated July 6, 2009 -- months before the sudden-acceleration problem was widely known outside Toyota and the federal highway regulatory agency.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Between the Super Bowl and word that thousands of Prius hybrids could soon join the millions of vehicles already being recalled, Sunday threatened to be an awful day at Toyota of Glendale. But a slow stream of customers headed into its Brand Boulevard showroom throughout the morning and early afternoon. Some were looking for bargains, some for answers and some loyal customers were looking to buy. This weekend a company spokesman said Toyota was considering recalling its 2010 Prius hybrids because of problems with the anti-lock brake system.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Here in this Mississippi Delta county, they are waiting for the return of the slender man in the elegant suit -- the one who spoke, in a heavy Chinese accent, of a promise that couldn't have been more welcome or fashionable. It was the promise of a new green industry, with hundreds of green jobs. "I heard about it," said Claude Boyd, a 41-year-old farmhand out of work after the winter harvest. "I need it bad. I've got good references." Joey Lowery, 42 and also unemployed, sounded a skeptical note.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2009 | Martin Zimmerman and Maura Dolan
Toyota Motor Corp.'s decision to abandon its assembly line in Fremont marks the end of large-scale auto manufacturing in California, which over the years boasted a dozen or more plants building vehicles ranging from Studebakers to Camaro muscle cars. The Japanese automaker said Thursday that it would end production at the plant March 31, throwing 4,700 people out of work, and return some production to Japan. It's another hard blow for California, a state already grappling with an 11.9% unemployment rate -- its highest since World War II and the fourth-worst in the nation.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After spending nearly 5 years and $24 million to develop an engine technology that it promised would revolutionize the auto industry, Rosen Motors will close its doors on Friday because it couldn't persuade any major car manufacturers to buy into its vision. Launched in 1993 by Harold Rosen, a renowned aerospace engineer, and his brother Ben, a legendary venture capitalist and chairman of Compaq Computer Corp., Rosen Motors aimed to develop a turbine-flywheel powertrain for passenger cars.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2010 | By Robert Faturechi
California electric car maker Tesla Motors Inc. plans to raise up to $100 million in an initial public offering, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The move brings the innovative car company, which has long enticed car enthusiasts, one step closer to becoming a household name. The price of shares or the timing of their availability is still unclear, but industry observers expect the much-anticipated offering to be well-received by investors.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|