Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAutomobile Industry Europe
IN THE NEWS

Automobile Industry Europe

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 17, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renault of France offered Tuesday to buy a controlling 35% share of troubled Nissan Motor Co., a deal that would give Europe its first beachhead to Japan's auto-manufacturing industry. Although details are still being negotiated, the linkup would in theory enable Nissan, No. 7 worldwide in vehicle production, and No. 11 Renault to compete more effectively against bigger players in the rapidly consolidating global auto industry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cherished personal car is the most expensive and important purchase made by most Europeans, who are far less likely than Americans to become homeowners. Yet it is the one product that has proved fiercely resistant to the consumer benefits promised by Europe's emerging single market. Car prices in the auto-making mecca that is Germany, as in some other European Union nations, are dictated by the manufacturers.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 28, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Volkswagen, Europe's largest auto maker, said Friday it will spend $36 billion on improving its production facilities and developing new models over the next five years. The investment was approved by VW's supervisory board here the same day the company began selling the first New Beetle in Europe--nine months after its U.S. introduction. VW is hoping the wave of Beetlemania that engulfed the American public this year will spill into its home market.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2000 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. Chairman John Smith dined with Fiat Chairman Paolo Fresco over calamari risotto and monkfish here last month, discussing wines, world travel and the global truck market. It was a relaxing chance for the two to get to know each other better three months after a dramatic share swap between the two industrial titans that left GM with 20% of the Italian conglomerate's car business.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mazda to Sell Ford-Built Car in Europe: The auto maker said it reached an agreement with Ford Motor Co. to sell a small car based on the Ford Fiesta. Mazda Motor Corp., which is 25%-owned by Ford, will buy about 25,000 of the cars annually and sell them through its European dealerships starting in the spring of 1996. After dropping a plan to set up its own production facility in Europe, Mazda said in October that it was in the final stages of negotiations to buy Ford-made cars in Europe.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1992 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ford Motor Co. said Wednesday it will take a $7.7-billion charge against its 1992 earnings to account for retiree health benefits and the cost of laying off nearly 10,000 European workers over the coming year. The one-time charges are expected to leave Ford with a $7-billion loss for 1992, dwarfing the company's previous record loss of $2.3 billion in 1991. But this year's deficit will be due to accounting changes and does not reflect weakness in Ford's U.S.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Europeans Want 'Affirmative Action' on Cars: A group of European auto makers urged Japan last week to set targets for sharply increasing foreign cars' share of the Japanese market. The request came three days after President Bush returned home with pledges from Japan to buy $19 billion in auto parts and about 20,000 more cars a year from the United States.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1992
The Point Mugu Naval Base is only going to work nine days every two weeks instead of 10 days in order to meet a rule by the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District. The county transportation specialist says this will definitely help lessen Ventura County air pollution. Who is kidding whom? Instead of 5,379 civilians and sailors making one round trip to Point Mugu on the 10th day, they will now be free to drive their cars all day. MARVIN O. MILLER Oxnard
BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DaimlerChrysler's announcement Monday that it will buy a 34% stake in Mitsubishi Motors Corp. gives the German-American company a fighting chance to meet goals of controlling 25% of the fast-growing Asian market as well as demands in Europe and the U.S. for cars that are more fuel-efficient and less polluting. For the auto giant that was created in 1998 by fusing Daimler and Chrysler Corp.
NEWS
February 26, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German manufacturers produced 60% of the 160 million cars now zooming along the highways and byways of Europe, and that has long been a source of pride as well as income in this automotive powerhouse. But the very success of German auto makers is coming back to haunt them as the European Union invokes tough new ecological and recycling standards for its 15 member states.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renault of France offered Tuesday to buy a controlling 35% share of troubled Nissan Motor Co., a deal that would give Europe its first beachhead to Japan's auto-manufacturing industry. Although details are still being negotiated, the linkup would in theory enable Nissan, No. 7 worldwide in vehicle production, and No. 11 Renault to compete more effectively against bigger players in the rapidly consolidating global auto industry.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Fiat, Europe's third-biggest car maker, confirmed Sunday that it is in talks with Swedish car and truck maker Volvo about forging an alliance, according to a member of Italy's Agnelli family, which controls Fiat. Umberto Agnelli, chairman of Ifil, an Agnelli family holding company and the dominant shareholder in Fiat, said Volvo was one of "two or three" possible partners for Fiat. There is no deadline for the talks, and a combination isn't "indispensable" for Fiat, he said.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Volkswagen, Europe's largest auto maker, said Friday it will spend $36 billion on improving its production facilities and developing new models over the next five years. The investment was approved by VW's supervisory board here the same day the company began selling the first New Beetle in Europe--nine months after its U.S. introduction. VW is hoping the wave of Beetlemania that engulfed the American public this year will spill into its home market.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DaimlerChrysler, created from a merger of two of the world's most venerable car concerns, held a financial coming-out party Tuesday that may herald a new era of global automotive competition. But behind the hoopla surrounding the combination of Chrysler Corp. and Daimler-Benz of Germany remains the difficult task of melding two huge institutions with proud heritages and vastly different cultures. It won't be easy.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1998 | Bloomberg News
One of General Motors Corp.'s top European executives quit because of disagreements with GM about how the car maker is being run, just days after reports surfaced that the chief executive of Adam Opel is being abruptly recalled to the U.S. GM said in a prepared statement that Hans Wilhelm Gaeb, the vice president of GM Europe and chairman of Opel's supervisory board, was resigning. Gaeb, 62, stepped down "due to differing perceptions of the company's business strategy," GM said.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Rumors of a major deal between Volvo and Volkswagen were quashed Friday when the Swedish vehicle maker said it was not in talks beyond the current cooperation on diesel motors. "There are no more concrete discussions about cooperation with Volkswagen than on the diesel motor side," Volvo spokesman Stefan Lorentzson told Reuters.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|