Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAutomobile Industry Japan
IN THE NEWS

Automobile Industry Japan

NEWS
October 19, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nissan Motor Co., once a highflying icon of Japanese economic might, on Monday announced a historic reorganization providing both a stark reminder of its fall from grace and the most dramatic evidence yet that Japan is on the road to meaningful restructuring after years of paralysis.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 16, 1999 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos Ghosn, the former Renault trouble-shooter recently named chief operating officer of Nissan Motor Co., said Thursday that his top priority is to return the Japanese auto maker to profitability. Ghosn, known as "Le Cost Killer" for his restructuring of Renault of France two years ago, is visiting the United States as part of an intensive fact-finding mission to assess Nissan's operations worldwide.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Toyota Motor Sales USA faces one of the largest automobile recalls ever as federal officials prepare to seek a court order in Washington on Monday to force the nation's best-selling foreign car maker to replace or repair emissions-control computers on 2.2 million vehicles. The Torrance-based subsidiary of Japan's Toyota Motor Corp. says it will fight the recall. If the company were forced to replace the $250 computers, the cost could hit $550 million.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1999 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of teasing, Nissan Motor Co. said Wednesday that it will bring its famed Z sports car back to the U.S. market within three years, a move aimed at revitalizing its flagging fortunes and product portfolio. "We will build it," declared Minoru Nakamura, president and chief executive of Gardena-based Nissan North America, at a news conference at the New York International Auto Show. The Z car holds a special mystique for Nissan.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
As expected, Renault of France agreed today to buy a controlling stake in debt-burdened Nissan Motor Co., Japan's No. 2 auto maker. In a statement, the companies announced that Renault will invest $5.1 billion by taking a 36.8% equity stake in Nissan Motor and a 22.5% equity stake in Nissan Diesel, the Japanese firm's truck affiliate. Under Japanese law, Renault's more than one-third stake in Nissan Motor will give it veto power over company decisions.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renault of France offered Tuesday to buy a controlling 35% share of troubled Nissan Motor Co., a deal that would give Europe its first beachhead to Japan's auto-manufacturing industry. Although details are still being negotiated, the linkup would in theory enable Nissan, No. 7 worldwide in vehicle production, and No. 11 Renault to compete more effectively against bigger players in the rapidly consolidating global auto industry.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1999 | DONALD W. NAUSS and MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thirteen years ago, David Halberstam's "The Reckoning" explored the changing industrial fortunes of Japan and the United States through the rise of Nissan Motor Co. and the decline of Ford Motor Co. The book portrayed Nissan as a determined, customer-driven company that made U.S. inroads with high-quality, sporty cars. In contrast, Ford was depicted as a faltering, risk-averse concern run by accountants absorbed with profit and stock value rather than emotion-stirring vehicles.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DaimlerChrysler's bid to acquire a stake in Nissan Motor Co. failed to produce an agreement Friday despite top-level executive meetings this week, but both companies left the hood and side doors open for further progress. DaimlerChrysler Co-Chairmen Robert J. Eaton and Juergen E. Schrempp held discussions with Nissan President Yoshikazu Hanawa in Tokyo that the companies characterized as "constructive" regarding both the diesel truck and passenger vehicle arms of Japan's No. 2 auto maker.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1998 | Reuters
Honda Motor Co. said that the retail price of the best-selling Accord will increase an average of 0.8%, or $175, on a sales-weighted basis in the 1999 model year. The increase in the price of the U.S.-built car follows the 15% price cut on the '99 Acura 3.2TL luxury sedan. The best-selling model, the four-cylinder LX sedan with automatic transmission, will carry a price tag of $19,190, up $100 from the '98 model.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Toyota Motor Corp. announced Tuesday that it will start exporting its fuel-efficient hybrid-power Prius sedan to North America and Europe in the fall of 2000. More than 7,700 of the four-door compacts have been sold in Japan since their domestic launch in December. Jeremy Barnes, spokesman for Toyota Motor Sales USA in Torrance, said it is "a safe bet" that U.S. marketing efforts will concentrate on California and New York. The Prius sells in Japan for about $15,000.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|