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BUSINESS
January 25, 1991 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp., swamped with excess cars, said Thursday that it will indefinitely lay off about 850 of the 3,200 workers at its Van Nuys assembly plant, effective April 2. The announcement came one day after GM said it would indefinitely idle 975 workers at its Fairfax plant in Kansas City, Kan., which employs 3,000 and builds the Pontiac Grand Prix. The layoffs, which will occur as both plants cut back to one production shift from two, will be decided by seniority among the workers.
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BUSINESS
September 19, 1987 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
General Motors is losing customers to Ford and other car manufacturers because its Van Nuys plant has fallen behind its production schedule after four months of using a new, highly-touted Japanese manufacturing method, according to plant manager Ernest Schaefer. In a September 4 letter to Van Nuys' 4,000 employees, Schaefer told workers that they are stopping the assembly line too frequently and that the lower production schedule is costing GM customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA
General Motors officials told Los Angeles City Councilman Ernani Bernardi's office Wednesday that they have selected a real estate broker to help sell their 101-acre Van Nuys property. David Mays, Bernardi's chief deputy, called the meeting a "courtesy visit to keep us up to date on the progress of their efforts to dispose of the property." The Van Nuys plant, closed in August after four decades of auto production, is in Bernardi's district.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
The General Motors assembly plant in Van Nuys, which many have feared would be shut down, will instead "definitely continue operations for many years to come," according to a high-ranking union leader who ought to know. The unusual but unambiguous assurance about the future of the plant came in an interview with Bruce Lee, United Auto Workers' Western regional director. Normally, the company announces a policy decision about a plant's future.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1987 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
A new round of layoffs may be forthcoming at the General Motors plant in Van Nuys, company and unions officials said Friday, because of continuing poor sales of cars made there. Local GM and United Auto Workers officials were sequestered in meetings Friday discussing ways to cut employment at the huge assembly plant, if layoffs are ordered by GM officials in Detroit. "They're thinking about having a layoff," said Jerry Shrieves, local president of the UAW.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1991 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
A last-ditch effort by a group of Los Angeles-area political leaders Tuesday failed to persuade General Motors Co. executives to reconsider their plan to close the Van Nuys assembly plant--Southern California's last remaining car factory. Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) and state Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Sylmar) had hoped to ease the pain of the recession locally with a plan to make the Van Nuys facility the hub of new transportation technology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2000 | D.B. YOUNG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are about 100 auto dealerships in the San Fernando and neighboring valleys, and one person who has followed the network's many twists and turns over the years is Chris Denove, director of automotive retail/distribution for J. D. Power & Associates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1999 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1945, when the San Fernando Valley was still largely populated by citrus groves, General Motors purchased land from the Panorama Ranch Co., to serve as the future home for a major auto production plant. That move, and similar actions by some of the biggest names in manufacturing, helped create a Valley region that would eventually be defined by the products it produced--cars, warplanes, even beer. On Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1991 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
A last-ditch effort by a group of Los Angeles-area political leaders Tuesday failed to persuade General Motors Co. executives to reconsider their plan to close the Van Nuys assembly plant--Southern California's last remaining car factory. Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, Rep. Howard Berman (D-Los Angeles) and state Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Panorama City) had hoped to ease the pain of the recession locally with a plan to make the Van Nuys facility the hub of new transportation technology.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1990 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only one of the 3,000 or so parts that go into a new Chevrolet Camaro or Pontiac Firebird. But for Larry Barker, a welder at the General Motors assembly plant in Van Nuys, one part summed up all that is wrong with the way GM builds cars. One night last fall Barker, along with the rest of the second shift, was sent home early after GM ran out of a reinforcement panel that is welded next to the wheel wells near the motor compartment of the Camaros and Firebirds.
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