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Automobile Industry Mexico

BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago, when Detroit was the world's undisputed car-making capital and Canadians streamed through the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel every day to work in its factories, Mexico had virtually no automotive industry. Decades of government-industry coordination that rivals the cooperation among Japanese leaders and business executives have changed that scenario.
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BUSINESS
May 10, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Honda Motor Co. announced Monday that it will build a $50-million automotive assembly plant near Guadalajara to produce mid-size sedans for the growing Mexican market and possibly for future export to Latin America. The 250,000-square-foot plant, to be located next to an existing Honda motorcycle and auto parts factory, will build 15,000 Accord sedans annually. Mexican law requires companies to build cars in Mexico if they want to sell vehicles in the country.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first major investment by a big manufacturer in the wake of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Ford Motor Co. will spend $200 million--mostly in Mexico--to boost production, creating 850 new North American jobs, company officials said Thursday.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's oldest automotive plant will be the first casualty of the stricter industrial pollution guidelines for this smog-choked city that were enacted earlier this week. General Motors Corp. announced Friday that the company will relocate its 56-year-old truck plant, which employs 1,500 workers, within five years--three years longer than officials here said they would give polluters.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nissan Corp. has agreed to invest $1 billion during the next three years to expand its vehicle manufacturing operations in Aguascalientes, Mexican trade officials announced Tuesday. The commitment represents the largest single foreign investment package in Mexico unveiled during 1989, said Gregory Leddy, a New York-based spokesman for the Mexican Secretariat of Trade and Industrial Development. Earlier this year, Leddy noted, Ford Motor Co.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Mexico's President Vicente Fox met recently in Detroit with United Auto Workers President Stephen P. Yokich and International Brotherhood of Teamsters President James P. Hoffa to discuss how to raise wage levels for Mexican workers. The talks were serious, not a mere public relations gesture. Fox and the U.S. unions share a common need to see Mexican wages and living standards rise. Mexico can't afford to rely on low-cost labor as a competitive advantage, and the U.S. unions, as well as the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rockwell International on Tuesday said it will build an automotive parts manufacturing plant in Mexico that will employ 150 people. The plant will be located in Queretaro, about 120 miles northwest of Mexico City, and will make window regulators, or controls, sunroofs, and door latches for Chrysler and Volkswagen vehicles to be sold in Mexico, according to Rockwell, which has its headquarters in Seal Beach. The 63,000-square-foot plant will be built on a 6.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1990 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co. said Wednesday that it was firing up to 2,400 workers at a Mexican assembly plant after a monthlong walkout over a union dispute. Ford spokesman Carlos Bandala said about 1,400 workers at the company's Cuautitlan assembly plant had returned to their jobs but the remaining 2,400 still taking part in the walkout had been sent notifications that they were being cut from the payroll.
NEWS
May 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexican tractor-trailers won't have to undergo a U.S. safety check for up to 18 months after they have full access to American roads under proposed federal rules. Critics pounced on that aspect of the plan, saying the trucks should be thoroughly inspected before being allowed to operate in the U.S. to ensure American motorists aren't alongside unsafe vehicles.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the sleepy industrial town known as the Little Mexican Detroit to the bustling maquiladora plants along the U.S. border, tens of thousands of Mexican auto workers have suddenly gotten a glimpse of the downside of free trade. Thanks to a strike by 3,000 United Auto Workers members in Ohio that halted production of key brake parts, General Motors Corp. this week idled 2,500 non-UAW workers at its auto assembly and engine factory in the northern town of Ramos Arizpe.
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