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BUSINESS
December 7, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As Mikhail S. Gorbachev makes a pitch during his New York visit for more business with the United States, his government is returning to an old Russian standby and once again asking Ford Motor Co. to make cars in the Soviet Union. The immediate story is that the Soviet automotive ministry is talking to Ford about modernizing a 60-year-old car plant in the city of Gorky to manufacture Ford Scorpio models in the Soviet Union.
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NEWS
October 10, 1990 | United Press International
A state-owned auto plant rejected an order from the Russian Federation for armored limousines for Boris N. Yeltsin and Russian Premier Ivan S. Silayev, an official said Tuesday. Ruslan Khasbulatov, vice president of the republic, told the parliament that the order for four limousines was rejected by the Gorky automotive works and the Soviet automobile industry minister because permission of the KGB security agency had not been granted for building the cars.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what it billed as the first significant working relationship between an American auto company and the Soviet Union in the post-World War II era, General Motors said Thursday that it has agreed to sell nearly $1 billion worth of automotive parts to that country's largest auto maker. GM's announcement comes just days after Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev publicly criticized American auto makers for not taking a more active role in developing bilateral relationships with his nation.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | From Reuters
A Soviet auto plant has produced the first cars fitted with special systems to neutralize exhaust fumes, Tass news agency reported. It said the factory in the city of Gorky had sent the 600 cars to Moscow to be used as taxis.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union, eager to modernize its long-stagnant auto industry and become a force in the international market, has opened negotiations with both Chrysler and Ford about a wide range of possible trade links between Detroit's car makers and Moscow, auto industry officials said here Monday. Chrysler officials said a team of company executives visited the Soviet Union for the first time two weeks ago to discuss a range of joint venture alternatives with the Soviets.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what it billed as the first significant working relationship between an American auto company and the Soviet Union in the post-World War II era, General Motors said Thursday that it has agreed to sell nearly $1 billion worth of automotive parts to that country's largest auto maker. GM's announcement comes just days after Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev publicly criticized American auto makers for not taking a more active role in developing bilateral relationships with his nation.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | United Press International
A state-owned auto plant rejected an order from the Russian Federation for armored limousines for Boris N. Yeltsin and Russian Premier Ivan S. Silayev, an official said Tuesday. Ruslan Khasbulatov, vice president of the republic, told the parliament that the order for four limousines was rejected by the Gorky automotive works and the Soviet automobile industry minister because permission of the KGB security agency had not been granted for building the cars.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blending the lessons of ancient history and modern terrorism, Rome will salute Mikhail S. Gorbachev today with a Caesar's welcome and high-tech security. Roman traffic, sludge at the best of times, will snarl to a halt this morning to clear passage for a procession of vehicles carrying the Soviet president, his wife, Raisa, and their party past cheering pedestrians and an army of 5,000 Soviet and Italian security agents, including sharpshooters atop imperial ruins and Renaissance palaces.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In a pioneering article, the government newspaper Izvestia has warned potential auto buyers that a lot of Soviet-built cars are poorly made. It is the most candid advice for consumers that regular readers of the state-run press can recall, and it confirms what a lot of people already knew. A car is one of the biggest investments that a Soviet family can make, second only to buying a cooperative apartment.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blending the lessons of ancient history and modern terrorism, Rome will salute Mikhail S. Gorbachev today with a Caesar's welcome and high-tech security. Roman traffic, sludge at the best of times, will snarl to a halt this morning to clear passage for a procession of vehicles carrying the Soviet president, his wife, Raisa, and their party past cheering pedestrians and an army of 5,000 Soviet and Italian security agents, including sharpshooters atop imperial ruins and Renaissance palaces.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As Mikhail S. Gorbachev makes a pitch during his New York visit for more business with the United States, his government is returning to an old Russian standby and once again asking Ford Motor Co. to make cars in the Soviet Union. The immediate story is that the Soviet automotive ministry is talking to Ford about modernizing a 60-year-old car plant in the city of Gorky to manufacture Ford Scorpio models in the Soviet Union.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union, eager to modernize its long-stagnant auto industry and become a force in the international market, has opened negotiations with both Chrysler and Ford about a wide range of possible trade links between Detroit's car makers and Moscow, auto industry officials said here Monday. Chrysler officials said a team of company executives visited the Soviet Union for the first time two weeks ago to discuss a range of joint venture alternatives with the Soviets.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | From Reuters
A Soviet auto plant has produced the first cars fitted with special systems to neutralize exhaust fumes, Tass news agency reported. It said the factory in the city of Gorky had sent the 600 cars to Moscow to be used as taxis.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In a pioneering article, the government newspaper Izvestia has warned potential auto buyers that a lot of Soviet-built cars are poorly made. It is the most candid advice for consumers that regular readers of the state-run press can recall, and it confirms what a lot of people already knew. A car is one of the biggest investments that a Soviet family can make, second only to buying a cooperative apartment.
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