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BUSINESS
May 2, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
The U.S. auto industry started the spring selling season with its traditional bang, as consumers spent their income tax refunds on cars and pushed April sales up 13% over last year, auto makers said Wednesday. Chrysler Corp.'s April sales were up 33% compared with the year-ago period. General Motors Corp., overcoming the effects of a strike in March, said its sales rose 8.1 %.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 2003 | From Reuters
Auto sales slowed in January from the breakneck pace set a month earlier, but some automakers used aggressive consumer incentives and hot products to eke out impressive gains. January's seasonally adjusted annual sales rate was about 16.2 million units, well off December's 18.3-million rate but higher than the 15.8-million rate set in January 2002.
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BUSINESS
January 4, 1995 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Big Three auto makers expect vehicle sales to continue rising for the next two years, but they worry that another interest rate increase early this year could hurt sales and damage the national economy. Economists for Ford Motor Co., Chrysler Corp. and General Motors Corp. estimated Tuesday that sales will hit 15.6 million to 16.2 million vehicles this year, up from about 15.4 million in 1994. The industry projects car and truck sales for 1996 at 15.7 million to 16.8 million.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2002 | Justin Hyde, Reuters
Automakers said U.S. sales fell 13% in November from a booming month a year ago, and an unexpected production cut by Ford Motor Co. on Tuesday sent shares down across the industry. But despite the declines, November sales hit a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 16 million vehicles, up from October's four-year low of 15.4 million and a sign that Americans still are willing to buy cars and trucks. The drop was led by a 21% decline at Ford and a 19% decline at General Motors Corp.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Women and blacks who bargain for a new car are given higher final prices than white men, according to a study surveying hundreds of car dealerships. Black women were offered the highest prices, averaging $875 per car more than white men, the study found. Ian Ayres, a Northwestern University law professor who headed the research, said the study results may be attributable to car dealers trying to concentrate profits by targeting a relatively few customers--"suckers"--who will pay higher markups.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sales of new North American-made cars fell 6.1% in mid-November from the same period last year, auto makers reported Monday in the latest indication of their industry's weakness. The industry's lengthening sales slump--which has been paced by the Big Three of General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp.--could mean that auto makers will lengthen their year-end factory shutdowns in an attempt to trim production and deflate an inventory backlog, analysts said.
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | CATHY CURTIS
Did Americans buy cars before there were brochures to persuade them to do so? Apparently not. In 1903, fledgling Ford Motor Co. sent out the first of a flock of sales booklets targeted to doctors, salesmen and lawyers. David L. Lewis, professor of business history at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, said the pioneering auto manufacturer's earliest brochures touted the benefits of the coupe.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2003 | From Reuters
Auto sales slowed in January from the breakneck pace set a month earlier, but some automakers used aggressive consumer incentives and hot products to eke out impressive gains. January's seasonally adjusted annual sales rate was about 16.2 million units, well off December's 18.3-million rate but higher than the 15.8-million rate set in January 2002.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1993 | From Associated Press
New car and truck sales surged in April to their best levels in 2 1/2 years as consumers went on an early spring buying spree, figures released by the auto makers showed Tuesday. Sales exceeded estimates of many industry analysts. "We seem to have gotten a one-month jump on the spring selling season compared with falloffs in April the last two years," McDonald & Co. analyst David Garrity said.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
Sales of domestically built cars and trucks rose 12% in late March, with passenger cars making their first solid contribution in two months, according to auto makers' figures released Monday. Car sales, which have lagged behind light trucks for much of the last year, were up 8% over the same period a year ago. Sales of minivans, sport utility trucks and pickups continued their momentum, rising 18.1% in the March 21-31 period.
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | CATHY CURTIS
Did Americans buy cars before there were brochures to persuade them to do so? Apparently not. In 1903, fledgling Ford Motor Co. sent out the first of a flock of sales booklets targeted to doctors, salesmen and lawyers. David L. Lewis, professor of business history at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, said the pioneering auto manufacturer's earliest brochures touted the benefits of the coupe.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1999 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Saturn Corp., dogged by slipping sales and a solitary line of aging subcompacts, will unveil its first mid-size sedan Wednesday at the New York International Auto Show. The debut of the 2000 L-Series sedan and wagon, which go on sale in July, comes at a time of unusual turmoil for Saturn, the small-car unit of General Motors Corp. and a onetime pioneer in new technologies, no-dicker pricing and freer labor-management relations.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
The U.S. auto industry started the spring selling season with its traditional bang, as consumers spent their income tax refunds on cars and pushed April sales up 13% over last year, auto makers said Wednesday. Chrysler Corp.'s April sales were up 33% compared with the year-ago period. General Motors Corp., overcoming the effects of a strike in March, said its sales rose 8.1 %.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1995 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Big Three auto makers expect vehicle sales to continue rising for the next two years, but they worry that another interest rate increase early this year could hurt sales and damage the national economy. Economists for Ford Motor Co., Chrysler Corp. and General Motors Corp. estimated Tuesday that sales will hit 15.6 million to 16.2 million vehicles this year, up from about 15.4 million in 1994. The industry projects car and truck sales for 1996 at 15.7 million to 16.8 million.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1993 | From Associated Press
New car and truck sales surged in April to their best levels in 2 1/2 years as consumers went on an early spring buying spree, figures released by the auto makers showed Tuesday. Sales exceeded estimates of many industry analysts. "We seem to have gotten a one-month jump on the spring selling season compared with falloffs in April the last two years," McDonald & Co. analyst David Garrity said.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
Sales of domestically built cars and trucks rose 12% in late March, with passenger cars making their first solid contribution in two months, according to auto makers' figures released Monday. Car sales, which have lagged behind light trucks for much of the last year, were up 8% over the same period a year ago. Sales of minivans, sport utility trucks and pickups continued their momentum, rising 18.1% in the March 21-31 period.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1999 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Saturn Corp., dogged by slipping sales and a solitary line of aging subcompacts, will unveil its first mid-size sedan Wednesday at the New York International Auto Show. The debut of the 2000 L-Series sedan and wagon, which go on sale in July, comes at a time of unusual turmoil for Saturn, the small-car unit of General Motors Corp. and a onetime pioneer in new technologies, no-dicker pricing and freer labor-management relations.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Women and blacks who bargain for a new car are given higher final prices than white men, according to a study surveying hundreds of car dealerships. Black women were offered the highest prices, averaging $875 per car more than white men, the study found. Ian Ayres, a Northwestern University law professor who headed the research, said the study results may be attributable to car dealers trying to concentrate profits by targeting a relatively few customers--"suckers"--who will pay higher markups.
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