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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1992
Re "Designing Without a Blueprint" and "L.A.'s Architectural Lemons?" Jan. 11: I was very disappointed to see The Times publish the Orange and Lemon Awards for the best and worst architecture in Los Angeles, because the Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum building in 1988 was tagged with a Lemon Award. When I attempted to contact the sponsors of the award, I discovered that the Orange and Lemon Awards Program lasted only two years and was terminated in 1988. The program obviously lacked something.
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OPINION
November 29, 2013
Re "Revive the Southwest Museum," Editorial, Nov. 25 I am deeply disturbed by the Autry National Center's management of the Southwest Museum. Instead of returning the Southwest Museum to its former glory and mission, the Autry is treating it as if it were a resource. The Southwest Museum deserves to remain a little gem. Its building is a unique treasure, an echo of old Los Angeles. As a second-generation Angeleno whose family has been here since 1900, I remember first going there in the fourth grade and having a great learning experience.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
The Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum has a new name: It is now the Autry Museum of Western Heritage, museum officials said. Joanne Hale, the museum's chief executive officer, said the change was made to "more clearly communicate (the museum's) focus." The nonprofit museum, which opened in 1988, is considered one of the most comprehensive repositories of Western history and art, museum officials said. It is situated in Griffith Park at 4700 Western Heritage Way, near the Los Angeles Zoo.
OPINION
November 25, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The Southwest Museum, which sits on a hilltop in Mount Washington, is the oldest museum in Los Angeles, a historic landmark, a testament to longevity in a town without much of that. For decades, it housed and displayed objects from a world-class collection of Native American and Latin American artifacts. But age - the museum will be 100 years old next year - along with the Northridge earthquake and financial troubles took their toll. In 2003, the museum officially merged with the larger Autry Museum of Western Heritage, which is located in Griffith Park and was founded in 1988 by its namesake, the Hollywood cowboy Gene Autry, the Western actor Monte Hale and their wives.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2010
EVENTS This year, New Year's Day is Free Day at the Autry, where current exhibitions include "Siqueiros in Los Angeles: Censorship Defied," an array of works that the acclaimed Mexican muralist created during a sojourn in the City of Angels in 1932 (the exhibition is soon to close, on Jan. 9) and "The Art of Native American Basketry: A Living Tradition," more than 250 baskets drawn from one of the largest holdings of its kind in the world belonging to Autry-partnered Southwest Museum of the American Indian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1997 | JERRY HICKS
I drove to Griffith Park in Los Angeles this week to sign a huge birthday card for Gene Autry. It's in the foyer at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage there, where he will appear at a special gala in his honor Monday night. That's because on that day, the Singing Cowboy, the Oklahoma Yodeler, the man who brought major league baseball to Orange County, will celebrate his 90th birthday. "Thank you for adding to my childhood memories," one woman wrote on his card.
NEWS
October 2, 1986 | RICH SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Construction of a Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum in Griffith Park appears certain, following the Los Angeles City Council's approval of the project Wednesday. The council, by an 11-0 vote, tentatively approved a 50-year lease, at $1 a year, for construction of the 139,436-square-foot museum on 2 1/2 acres in the Pine Meadows area of the park between the Golden State Freeway and the Greater Los Angeles Zoo parking lot.
REAL ESTATE
October 4, 1987 | BARNETT SUSSMAN, Sussman is a Times real estate writer
Yesterday's cowpokes, real and mythical, will be back in the saddle again when the $28-million Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum opens in Griffith Park around next August. Architecturally, the building, like the exhibits, will be part mission, part Main Street-Old West, mixed with a few measures of Melody Ranch--Autry's movie locale. The 139,436-square-foot building is located on a 13-acre site in the Pine Meadows section of the park, between the Golden State Freeway and the zoo parking lot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1986
A Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum in Griffith Park moved a step closer to reality Tuesday with the granting of approvals from a Los Angeles City Council panel over environmental opposition. The Board of Referred Powers, on a 5-0 vote, approved an environmental study declaring that the project "will not have a significant effect" on the park. It also authorized the city staff to negotiate a lease with the Autry Foundation for construction and operation of the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1990 | MIKE WYMA, Wyma writes regularly for Valley Calendar
Summer is the season to load the family into the car and head for the amusement parks. But if you've been to Magic Mountain and Universal Studios so often that the old fun mobile steers itself, it may be time to check out something a little different. Largely undiscovered is the Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum in Griffith Park, which opened 1 1/2 years ago. The museum offers a growing number of programs and live events in addition to its permanent and traveling exhibits.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
One of Los Angeles' longest-running and most adversarial cultural disputes - over the future of the Southwest Museum in Mount Washington, and its prized collection of Native American artifacts - has a chance of shifting to a less contentious footing. Supporters of the Southwest Museum have been trying for years to force its stepparent, the Autry National Center of the American West, to revive the castle-like, 98-year-old site as a vibrant showcase for the collection. Meanwhile, they have tried to block the Autry from shifting Native American exhibits to the Autry Museum in Griffith Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
This Sunday's annual Lummis Day festival, celebrating the history and culture of northeast L.A., calls to mind a time 100 years ago when the city was extremely pregnant with its first major, home-grown cultural institutions, but they had not yet quite been born. In its edition of June 16, 1912, the Los Angeles Times bannered the news that Charles F. Lummis and fellow members of the Southwest Society had paid $50,000 to secure a 17-acre property atop a bluff in Mount Washington for a museum to house Lummis' extraordinary collection of Native American artifacts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Howard Terpning paints how the West was lived and lost more than 120 years ago. His subject is 19th century Native Americans, although he is not their descendant. Some of his canvases aim to capture the courage, dignity and desperation of the fight to keep their land. Many are carefully detailed depictions of the ways of life they fought to save. "Tribute to the Plains People," now at the Autry National Center of the American West in Griffith Park, is the biggest solo show of Terpning's career - a retrospective that covers 35 years and documents his standing as the acknowledged leader of a popular but not universally admired movement in which paintings become time machines into the Old West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
As a set illustrator for Hollywood studios, Robert Temple Ayres created his most famous work at Paramount in 1959. Officially called "Map to Illustrate the Ponderosa in Nevada," it was conjured up just so it could burst into flames on television screens during the opening of the long-running show "Bonanza. " While the memorable "Bonanza" theme music played, Ayres' map appeared, then dissolved in flames , revealing the Ponderosa ranch's inhabitants on horseback — the Cartwright clan played by Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
When James Cooper was a teenager in segregated Louisiana, he worked at a factory for $2 a day and didn't see a bright future. So he entered the military, attracted by such benefits as free lodging and meals, and eventually joined the ranks of one of the first African American regiments in the U.S. Army, becoming what was known as a Buffalo Soldier. "Why did I join the Army? Survival. At 17, I looked at the Army and it was better than what I had," Cooper, now 89, told a small audience Sunday at the Autry National Center of the American West, in one of many events commemorating the birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. A program in Culver City featured a panel discussion, poetry, choral and jazz music and a staged reading of a play called "The Dreamers" featuring Margaret Avery, an actress best known for her role in "The Color Purple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Somewhere up there in California heaven, Charles Fletcher Lummis is not a happy man. A journalist and an obsessive collector of all things Western, Lummis was a pioneer L.A. historian who defended the cultural heritage of our state and region against those who would insult, ignore or steal it. He founded the city's first museum and built its first important museum building in 1914. And today, his Southwest Museum still rises like a castle on a hillside overlooking Lummis' favorite corner of the city, the Arroyo Seco.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2010
EVENTS This year, New Year's Day is Free Day at the Autry, where current exhibitions include "Siqueiros in Los Angeles: Censorship Defied," an array of works that the acclaimed Mexican muralist created during a sojourn in the City of Angels in 1932 (the exhibition is soon to close, on Jan. 9) and "The Art of Native American Basketry: A Living Tradition," more than 250 baskets drawn from one of the largest holdings of its kind in the world belonging to Autry-partnered Southwest Museum of the American Indian.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Daniel M. Finley rode into town barely a month ago, and the new president of the Autry National Center is already fixin' for a showdown with Doc Holliday, the Earp brothers and the Clanton gang. The lifesize figures of the OK Corral gunslingers have stood on the Griffith Park museum's lower level since it opened in 1988, in an exhibit representing the famed 1881 shootout in the Arizona Territory town of Tombstone. The problem, Finley says, is that there's no action ? push a button and all you get is an audio account of the gunfight, with lights shining on whichever character is supposed to be speaking.
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