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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
In “Stand-Off at Hwy #37,” a world premiere by Native Voices at the Autry, playwright Vickie Ramirez probes the ambiguous political landscape between Native and non-Native American territories. In upstate New York, residents of a reservation have organized a protest against an encroaching highway. A deceptively mild-mannered tribal elder, Aunt Bev (peppery LaVonne Rae Andrews), directs fellow protester Darrin (the scene-stealing Kalani Queypo) to place her armchair right on top of the disputed border.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Unless one is Native American, getting a grasp of complex Native American spiritual cosmologies is not easy. And that distinction, which might be called a quality of profound otherness, is in essence what drives a fascinating show recently opened at the Autry National Center of the American West in Griffith Park. It's a story of survival, of a will to endure in the face of crushing opposition. And it is a story told through beads. "Floral Journey: Native North American Beadwork" might sound like a simple decorative display of ornamented handiwork.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2011 | Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
With a $6.6-million construction grant at stake, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday endorsed the Autry National Center of the American West's plan to reconfigure galleries at its museum in Griffith Park, creating permanent displays of Native American artifacts. The proposal, which would be routine for most other museums, became contentious last month because it dovetails with the larger, longstanding question of whether turning the Griffith Park site into a home for the Autry's Native American collection spells the end of the Southwest Museum in Mount Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
The Autry National Center of the American West is hoping lots of people will get their kicks by giving money online to help fund its coming exhibition “Route 66: The Road and the Romance.” The Autry, which will open the show June 8, joins the likes of the Louvre and the Smithsonian Institution's Asian art museums in using a “crowdfunding” site to lasso donations. The Autry can appeal to people who otherwise might not know of the L.A. museum's existence but are fans of Route 66 and its manifestations in pop culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | Liesl Bradner
A basic plaid button-down intertwined over a simple blue denim shirt evoked more emotion from the reticent Ennis Del Mar than any words Heath Ledger could've spoken in "Brokeback Mountain." Ennis discovered the two lonely shirts hanging in a closet after the death of his lover Jack Twist, played by Jake Gyllenhaal. Symbolic of their lifelong forbidden relationship is that Jack's denim was draped over Ennis' plaid as if to protect him.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2011
POP MUSIC Further proving that rock concerts and museums need not be mutually exclusive, the Autry hosts country and blues singer Justin Townes Earle (son of troubadour Steve Earle) for an evening of carefully crafted Americana. Singer-songwriter Dawn Landes and old-time string band Triple Chicken Foot will also perform. Autry National Center of the American West, 4700 Western Heritage Way, L.A. $13. 8:30 to 11 p.m. Fri. (323) 667-2000. http://www.theautry.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2010
EVENTS This year, New Year's Day is Free Day at the Autry, where current exhibitions include "Siqueiros in Los Angeles: Censorship Defied," an array of works that the acclaimed Mexican muralist created during a sojourn in the City of Angels in 1932 (the exhibition is soon to close, on Jan. 9) and "The Art of Native American Basketry: A Living Tradition," more than 250 baskets drawn from one of the largest holdings of its kind in the world belonging to Autry-partnered Southwest Museum of the American Indian.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
John Gray, who rode off into retirement about 16 months ago after 11 years as president of the Autry National Center of the American West, is making an unexpected return astride one of the world's most-visited cultural institutions: He's been named director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History inWashington, D.C. "His passion for American history and scholarship is obvious, and it's what will make him a great leader...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
In traditional Native American belief, spirits can inhabit seemingly inanimate things. Can paintings, sculptures, decorative objects and handicrafts also be infused with the spirits of their subjects, and of the people who made them? If so, the new Irene Helen Jones Parks Gallery of Art, which opens Saturday at the Autry National Center of the American West in Griffith Park with the exhibition "Art of the West," is 4,000 square feet of haunted space where the gathered ghosts may be in tumult.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Should city approval of the Autry National Center's plans to install Native American galleries in its main museum in Griffith Park depend on the Autry addressing the future of its subsidiary venue, the venerable but problematic Southwest Museum in Mount Washington? That's a question that could be debated for a second consecutive summer following the Los Angeles City Council's vote Tuesday to take jurisdiction over the Autry's $8-million plan to convert two Griffith Park galleries into permanent exhibits on traditional Native American art and culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
In “Stand-Off at Hwy #37,” a world premiere by Native Voices at the Autry, playwright Vickie Ramirez probes the ambiguous political landscape between Native and non-Native American territories. In upstate New York, residents of a reservation have organized a protest against an encroaching highway. A deceptively mild-mannered tribal elder, Aunt Bev (peppery LaVonne Rae Andrews), directs fellow protester Darrin (the scene-stealing Kalani Queypo) to place her armchair right on top of the disputed border.
OPINION
November 29, 2013
Re "Revive the Southwest Museum," Editorial, Nov. 25 I am deeply disturbed by the Autry National Center's management of the Southwest Museum. Instead of returning the Southwest Museum to its former glory and mission, the Autry is treating it as if it were a resource. The Southwest Museum deserves to remain a little gem. Its building is a unique treasure, an echo of old Los Angeles. As a second-generation Angeleno whose family has been here since 1900, I remember first going there in the fourth grade and having a great learning experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Mike Boehm and Kate Linthicum
This post has been corrected. Please see below for details. Has the Autry National Center of the American West given taxpayers their money's worth on $10.5-million in federal and state grants received for its venerable Southwest Museum of the American Indian site in Mt. Washington? Not in the eyes of about two dozen protesters who gathered on the Southwest's doorstep Tuesday morning, chanting “Open these doors!” and holding signs with slogans such as  “Where's our millions?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
In traditional Native American belief, spirits can inhabit seemingly inanimate things. Can paintings, sculptures, decorative objects and handicrafts also be infused with the spirits of their subjects, and of the people who made them? If so, the new Irene Helen Jones Parks Gallery of Art, which opens Saturday at the Autry National Center of the American West in Griffith Park with the exhibition "Art of the West," is 4,000 square feet of haunted space where the gathered ghosts may be in tumult.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
Just about a year ago, author Craig Johnson was riding high. The premiere of "Longmire," the A&E TV series based on his Walt Longmire mystery novels, was the highest rated scripted drama in the network's history and he had just started his book tour for "As the Crow Flies," the eighth book in the series. He had stopped at a diner in Red Lodge, Mont., and as he was paying the cashier for his meal, he noticed an older woman staring at his hat -- a cap bearing the logo of his fictional Absaroka County Sheriff's Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Los Angeles' oldest museum site, the Natural History Museum in Exposition Park, is celebrating its centennial this year with the debut of a new entrance halland outdoor nature center, capping a full makeover that's already yielded new halls for dinosaurs and mammals, and the return of the museum's core domed 1913 building to its original glory. But will there be any reason for festivities surrounding next year's centennial of the Southwest Museum building in Mount Washington? For the past ten years, the castle-like, hilltop structure has been like a very old aunt whose care is a strain on the family, with different factions fighting over what should be done, and who should pay. Legally, the Southwest is the obligation of the Autry National Center of the American West.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
One of Los Angeles' longest-running and most adversarial cultural disputes - over the future of the Southwest Museum in Mount Washington, and its prized collection of Native American artifacts - has a chance of shifting to a less contentious footing. Supporters of the Southwest Museum have been trying for years to force its stepparent, the Autry National Center of the American West, to revive the castle-like, 98-year-old site as a vibrant showcase for the collection. Meanwhile, they have tried to block the Autry from shifting Native American exhibits to the Autry Museum in Griffith Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Unless one is Native American, getting a grasp of complex Native American spiritual cosmologies is not easy. And that distinction, which might be called a quality of profound otherness, is in essence what drives a fascinating show recently opened at the Autry National Center of the American West in Griffith Park. It's a story of survival, of a will to endure in the face of crushing opposition. And it is a story told through beads. "Floral Journey: Native North American Beadwork" might sound like a simple decorative display of ornamented handiwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Recruiting a new leader for a big museum can take months - sometimes more than a year - involving search committees, consultants and rounds of interviews and negotiations. In the case of the Autry National Center of the American West, finding its fourth chief executive since opening 25 years ago was a much simpler affair. The biggest challenge was for board chair Marshall McKay, tired from a 12-hour day of meetings, to muster the energy to rush through a hotel corridor in Portland, Ore., catch up with the man he'd pegged as the Autry's next leader, and make him a proposal from out of the blue.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
A new one-room permanent collection installation at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, on view for the rest of 2013, raises provocative questions in skillfully astute ways. The subject is 19th century American landscape art, and the artists range from the relatively obscure to the celebrated -- Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Hill, George Inness, John F. Kensett, Winslow Homer and more. The west wall has a spare lineup of all five LACMA paintings that show the American West, hung to create a continuous horizon line.
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