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Autry National Center

ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
Just about a year ago, author Craig Johnson was riding high. The premiere of "Longmire," the A&E TV series based on his Walt Longmire mystery novels, was the highest rated scripted drama in the network's history and he had just started his book tour for "As the Crow Flies," the eighth book in the series. He had stopped at a diner in Red Lodge, Mont., and as he was paying the cashier for his meal, he noticed an older woman staring at his hat -- a cap bearing the logo of his fictional Absaroka County Sheriff's Department.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Recruiting a new leader for a big museum can take months - sometimes more than a year - involving search committees, consultants and rounds of interviews and negotiations. In the case of the Autry National Center of the American West, finding its fourth chief executive since opening 25 years ago was a much simpler affair. The biggest challenge was for board chair Marshall McKay, tired from a 12-hour day of meetings, to muster the energy to rush through a hotel corridor in Portland, Ore., catch up with the man he'd pegged as the Autry's next leader, and make him a proposal from out of the blue.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2009 | By David Ng
Say the words "gay cowboy" and chances are the conversation will turn to "Brokeback Mountain," the 2005 film starring Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal, and based on the Annie Proulx short story. The Oscar-winning drama, which is set in the 1960s to '80s, highlighted a long-submerged facet of frontier culture. But as a new series at the Autry National Center shows, the presence of homosexuals and transgender individuals in the American West is much older than the movie might lead you to think.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
When James Cooper was a teenager in segregated Louisiana, he worked at a factory for $2 a day and didn't see a bright future. So he entered the military, attracted by such benefits as free lodging and meals, and eventually joined the ranks of one of the first African American regiments in the U.S. Army, becoming what was known as a Buffalo Soldier. "Why did I join the Army? Survival. At 17, I looked at the Army and it was better than what I had," Cooper, now 89, told a small audience Sunday at the Autry National Center of the American West, in one of many events commemorating the birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. A program in Culver City featured a panel discussion, poetry, choral and jazz music and a staged reading of a play called "The Dreamers" featuring Margaret Avery, an actress best known for her role in "The Color Purple.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2012
'Howard Terpning: Tribute to the Plains People' Where: Autry National Center of the American West, 4700 Western Heritage Way When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays, 11 a.m to 5 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays, through July 1. Tickets: $10 or $4-$6 for children, students and seniors. Information: (323) 667-2000. Theautry.org
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic
Architect Brenda Levin, a Los Angeles-based specialist in historic preservation and adaptive re-use of cultural facilities who recently transformed Griffith Observatory, has been selected as the design architect for the expansion and modernization of the Autry National Center in Griffith Park. The project will accommodate the vast collection of Native American artifacts compiled by the Southwest Museum, which merged with the Autry in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Mike Boehm and Kate Linthicum
This post has been corrected. Please see below for details. Has the Autry National Center of the American West given taxpayers their money's worth on $10.5-million in federal and state grants received for its venerable Southwest Museum of the American Indian site in Mt. Washington? Not in the eyes of about two dozen protesters who gathered on the Southwest's doorstep Tuesday morning, chanting “Open these doors!” and holding signs with slogans such as  “Where's our millions?
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