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BUSINESS
November 15, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
In the face of pared-down military budgets and increased demand for cheaper air and spacecraft, the region's aerospace industry emerged from restructuring earlier this decade with the lesson that it must reduce costs and incorporate new, time-saving technologies in order to stay competitive.
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NEWS
December 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities in Michigan and Missouri tried to determine how copies of Aviation Week and Chemical Week magazines had turned up in an abandoned Al Qaeda camp in Afghanistan. A copy of the aviation magazine bearing the Ann Arbor, Mich., address of an information company called ProQuest and the name "Universal Microfilms Inc." was found earlier this week. Also found was a chemistry text and a copy of Chemical Weekly addressed to the Kansas City, Mo., public library.
NEWS
November 18, 1986 | Associated Press
The launch of a "Star Wars" space mission in September was delayed because of concerns that one of the two payloads might collide with an unmanned Soviet space station, an industry magazine reported Monday. Aviation Week & Space Technology said Soviet ground controllers changed the course of the Salyut 7 station just hours before a Delta rocket was to lift off from Cape Canaveral on Sept. 5.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1993
Richard M. Janisse voluntarily resigned as president of Martin Aviation last week, the company said Monday, adding that owner William Lyon has become president and CEO of the small-plane services company. Janisse had been president of the company, based at John Wayne Airport, for three years. Lyon, a local home builder, is owner of Air/Lyon Inc., parent company of Martin Aviation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2006 | From a Times Staff Writer
Robert B. Hotz, longtime editor and then publisher of the influential magazine Aviation Week & Space Technology, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease at a hospital in Frederick, Md. He was 91. An expert on arms-control and disarmament issues, Hotz was appointed by President Reagan to the General Advisory Committee of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
NEWS
January 14, 1985 | Associated Press
An intelligence-gathering satellite that may be larger than a U.S. satellite to be launched next week was put into space by the Soviet Union in September, the magazine Aviation Week and Space Technology said today. The Soviet satellite, which intercepts radio communications, is in an orbit that frequently takes it over the United States. The U.S. satellite to be carried aloft by the space shuttle Discovery on Jan. 23 is destined to be in a geosynchronous orbit 22,300 miles over the Equator.
NEWS
July 13, 1987 | United Press International
A NASA panel headed by astronaut Sally Ride will recommend development of a manned lunar base as the nation's next goal in space instead of a more glamorous flight to Mars, officials said today. But Ride, the first American woman in space and a veteran of two shuttle flights, told Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine that a manned outpost on the moon could serve as a steppingstone to Mars and that exploration of the red planet should remain as an ultimate American space objective.
NEWS
November 5, 1988 | Associated Press
The secret space shuttle mission scheduled for later this month will carry an intelligence-gathering satellite that will cover 80% of the Soviet Union, an industry magazine reported Friday. "When fully deployed, the spacecraft will have a span as large as 150 feet," Aviation Week and Space Technology reported. "It has the characteristics of an imaging radar or optical reconnaissance involving digital imaging, or both.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | United Press International
A NASA panel headed by astronaut Sally K. Ride will recommend development of a manned lunar base as the nation's next goal in space instead of a more glamorous flight to Mars, officials said Monday. But Ride, the first American woman in space and a veteran of two shuttle flights, told Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine that a manned outpost on the moon could serve as a stepping stone to Mars and that exploration of the red planet should remain as an ultimate American space objective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Merv Corning, 80, a Southern California artist best known for his realistic paintings of airplanes and football players, died Sept. 24 of lung cancer at his home in Solvang. Corning, who had no formal art education, began his career doing commercial illustration. His first major commission was for Leach International in 1959. He used watercolors to paint World War I-era planes and pilots for ads to be placed in Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine.
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