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Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri

December 21, 2009 | By Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Tehran and Dubai, United Arab Emirates — Tens of thousands of opposition supporters today took to the streets of Qom, Iran's main theological center, to mourn the passing of the country's top dissident cleric, Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri, who died at age 87 late Saturday. Witnesses described a steady procession of mourners in Qom walking from Montazeri's home to the shrine of Fatemeh Masoumeh, where he was laid to rest. Despite the presence of security forces, many chanted anti-government slogans and carried green ribbons and banners signifying allegiance to the opposition movement that sprang out of Iran's disputed June presidential elections.
December 20, 2009 | Ramin Mostaghim
Thousands of supporters of Iran's most senior dissident cleric marched through streets in his hometown and descended upon the country's main theological center today to mourn his passing just days before the climax of a politically charged religious commemoration. Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri, a pillar of the Islamic Revolution three decades ago who became a staunch defender of the nation's current opposition movement, died late Saturday of complications due to advanced age, diabetes and asthma, his doctor told state television.
July 21, 2001
A group of 554 clerics has demanded release of Iran's most prominent dissident, Grand Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri, who has been under house arrest in Qom since 1997. Montazeri's detention is "illegal and illegitimate" and should be lifted immediately, the clerics said in a petition to the country's senior religious authorities. Montazeri, 79, was once designated to succeed Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, father of the 1979 Islamic revolution.
April 2, 1989 | PATRICK E. TYLER, The Washington Post
He is one of the millions of Iranians who have tried to get out--legally or illegally--and now he is resigned to stay, not because he wants to, but because the running took so much out of him. It was that night 18 months ago, lying half submerged in a drainage ditch near the Turkish-Greek border as four guards with lanterns stood over him in the dark.
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