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Ayatollah Khomeini

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BUSINESS
February 25, 1989
The death threat by Iranian leaders against a British author, plus the sizable bounty to murder the writer, represents a serious challenge to Muslim leaders throughout the world. They have a choice to renounce this vicious example of terrorism or to remain silent and give the impression that such despotism is not inconsistent with Islam. Political democracies, especially Britain and the United States, are also challenged.
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WORLD
December 14, 2009 | By Ramin Mostaghim
Political turmoil built Sunday over the burning of an image of Iran's revolutionary founder, which was aired, in a controversial move, on state television. Accusations that the incident was carried out by anti-government demonstrators sparked protests as well as threats against reformist leaders. Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Sunday said reformist politicians and anti-government demonstrators had defiled the image of his predecessor, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, during National Students Day protests last week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1985
Why the big flap over selling Iran military supplies? Let's just sell them our $600 ashtrays and $10 wrenches. Even the Ayatollah Khomeini's oil-bloated treasury can't stand that. MARTIN VANDERVEEN Los Angeles
OPINION
May 7, 2007
Re "Carter calls on students to unite," May 4 As I looked at the history of the Middle East, I found that Jimmy Carter was president when the shah of Iran was overthrown and the Ayatollah Khomeini became the head of the Iranian government. At the same time, Saddam Hussein, with the tacit approval of our government, came to power in Iraq. The Iran hostage crisis arose and Carter's inability to deal with it was one cause of his failure to win reelection. Why would anyone today give credence to his assessment of Middle East politics?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1989
A thousand "Praise Allah's to the Ayatollah Khomeini for doing what librarians have been attempting to do ever since the Christians destroyed the great Egyptian library in Alexandria in the year 391. He made the world realize the power of books. NEVA GLENN Atascadero
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1989
Hooray for the Supreme Court! In taking the first step to undermine Wade vs. Roe, it is doing to American women what the Ayatollah Khomeini did to Iranian women. Next, we may be forced to wear veils. HELEN WELLER Beverly Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1986
I thought I would never see the day when the Ayatollah Khomeini would be the kingmaker of U.S. politics. He not only decides who should be the President, but determines the duration of their tenure. It's bewildering to say the least. DENES MARSH Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1989
It was disheartening to learn that singer Cat Stevens, a Muslim since 1977, has backed the Ayatollah Khomeini's death threat against Salman Rushdie, author of "The Satanic Verses" (Morning Report, Feb. 24, and "The Sound and the Fury," March 1). In view of the themes of Stevens' music, it is curious that the artist, now Yusuf Islam, is suddenly intolerant of another artist. To think that a brilliant, sensitive and loving soul such as Stevens' could now deny Christ's most basic message is, in itself, more of an argument against Islam than anything Salman Rushdie could have written.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1989
Many Muslims of the world mourn the passing of Ayatollah Khomeini. To many he was a great man, a spiritual leader, the symbol of the power of Islam and the human spirit; to others he was despotic and cruel. History will record his tangible achievements and Allah will judge the intentions of his actions. Yet this one man impacted the lives of people across the world. Muslims, once allowed to hide in the shadows, were placed in the world spotlight, re-educated about Islam, and made choices, thus taking public stands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1988
My commendations to The Times for the front-page coverage. The Times story notes that some points are unproven, and that some witnesses' allegations have been denied. However, several points are undisputable: 1) Negotiators for the Carter Administration noted a cooling of interest on the part of the Iranians in October. 2) The Iranians, having just begun a war, lost interest in delivery of weapons already paid for by the shah. 3) U.S.-made weapons began to flow through Israel in February/March 1981.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | HILLEL ITALIE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago this month, Salman Rushdie received what he has called his "unfunny Valentine." On Feb. 14, 1989, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini condemned "The Satanic Verses" as blasphemy, and called for Rushdie's death. The author, who lives in London, was forced into hiding. The novel's Japanese translator was murdered, and the Italian and Norwegian translators were attacked. A decade later, the 51-year-old Rushdie is, in many ways, a fortunate man.
NEWS
March 18, 1995
Ahmad Khomeini, 50, son of Iran's late revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. A cleric and politician, the younger Khomeini lived for years in his father's shadow but had been expected to seize power after the ayatollah's death in 1989. Instead, he kept a low profile, apparently seeking to act as a powerbroker. In Tehran on Thursday six days after suffering a massive heart attack.
OPINION
April 12, 1992
Recently, Salman Rushdie, whose book was declared blasphemous by the late Ayatollah Khomeini and who has to be very careful to avoid falling victim to some Muslim fanatic determined to carry out the death sentence imposed on him, visited Washington and met with legislators. President Bush, however, was unwilling to meet with Rushdie, because, as his press secretary said, "There is no reason for any special relationship with Rushdie. . . . There is no reason for us to have any special interest" (March 26)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1991 | SALMAN RUSHDIE, Salman Rushdie's comments were adapted by the author from a forthcoming essay titled "One Thousand Days in a Balloon."
At the end of 1990, dispirited and demoralized, I faced my deepest grief, my sorrow at having been torn away from the cultures and societies from which I'd always drawn my inspiration--that is, the broad community of British Asians, the broader community of Indian Muslims. I determined to make my peace with Islam, even at the cost of my pride.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iranian President Hashemi Rafsanjani declared Monday that his government has no immediate interest in pursuing the release of foreign hostages in Lebanon. "I don't see any reason to get ourselves involved in this matter," he told reporters here. Rafsanjani, who pronounced himself willing to help in the midst of the hostage crisis two months ago, fell back on his subsequent position that "conditions are not right" for an effort on Tehran's part now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1989
Hooray for the Supreme Court! In taking the first step to undermine Wade vs. Roe, it is doing to American women what the Ayatollah Khomeini did to Iranian women. Next, we may be forced to wear veils. HELEN WELLER Beverly Hills
OPINION
April 12, 1992
Recently, Salman Rushdie, whose book was declared blasphemous by the late Ayatollah Khomeini and who has to be very careful to avoid falling victim to some Muslim fanatic determined to carry out the death sentence imposed on him, visited Washington and met with legislators. President Bush, however, was unwilling to meet with Rushdie, because, as his press secretary said, "There is no reason for any special relationship with Rushdie. . . . There is no reason for us to have any special interest" (March 26)
OPINION
March 12, 1989
William O. Beeman ("Is Khomeini a Barbarian? Would He Seem Less So in Light of Our Fanaticisms?" Op-Ed Page, Feb. 20), is wrong to compare the Ayatollah Khomeini's death sentence against Salman Rushdie to United States actions in Cuba, Libya, and Nicaragua. The ayatollah condemned Rushdie for his writings alone. In contrast, the United States has at least targeted foreign governments for their actions, which arguably violated the rights of their own citizens and of foreigners. We attacked Fidel Castro in Cuba and the Sandinistas in Nicaragua not for advocating tyranny, but for practicing it, and Moammar Kadafi in Libya not for defending terrorism, but for engaging in it. Our own foreign policy is hardly free of guilt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1989
Many Muslims of the world mourn the passing of Ayatollah Khomeini. To many he was a great man, a spiritual leader, the symbol of the power of Islam and the human spirit; to others he was despotic and cruel. History will record his tangible achievements and Allah will judge the intentions of his actions. Yet this one man impacted the lives of people across the world. Muslims, once allowed to hide in the shadows, were placed in the world spotlight, re-educated about Islam, and made choices, thus taking public stands.
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