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Ayman Nour

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WORLD
June 29, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
The most prominent opposition candidate in Egypt's coming presidential election pleaded not guilty to forgery charges Tuesday as a heavily criticized trial got off to a tumultuous start. As opening statements were heard in a cramped courtroom, thousands of security agents sealed off and lined the streets, clubs and shields in hand. Clashes erupted in the corridors between fervent supporters of Ayman Nour and short-tempered security guards.
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WORLD
June 23, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Just outside his office at the Arab League, Amr Moussa displays the typical power photos of Western politicians: handshake snapshots with the king of Spain, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Clinton. But in other photos, the longtime diplomat who is Egypt's leading presidential contender appears beside Syrian President Bashar Assad, Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi and ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. With the photos serving as a reminder of how close Moussa was to the previous Egyptian regime and to world leaders now likewise threatened by popular uprisings, the Arab League secretary-general faces a difficult balancing act in the coming months as he tries to position himself as both political veteran and reformer.
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WORLD
May 10, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
The bespectacled lawmaker marched into his plush office and settled before the television cameras. He grimaced shyly, almost whispering as he tested the microphones. And then, without a pause, Ayman Nour ripped into Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's ruling party. The night before, one of Nour's supporters had been killed and about a dozen more wounded when an armed mob ambushed their buses in the Nile Delta countryside, he said.
WORLD
February 13, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Bob Drogin, Los Angeles Times
He arrived uncorrupted and full of promise. Mohamed ElBaradei returned to his native Egypt one year ago to lead a movement to reform the constitution. Crowds greeted the Nobel Peace Prize laureate at the airport. The ruling National Democratic Party worried for the first time in decades that its power might be threatened. But even as Egyptians forced President Hosni Mubarak to step down Friday, the enthusiasm for ElBaradei had dwindled. The 68-year-old diplomat is viewed by many as a reluctant revolutionary, a man who inspired them but didn't lead them into the streets against the police state.
WORLD
December 25, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
In a verdict that came as a slap to democracy advocates, one of Egypt's most prominent and unflinching opposition politicians was sentenced Saturday to five years in prison on charges of forgery. The imprisonment of Ayman Nour, an outspoken former legislator who recently ran an intense election campaign against longtime President Hosni Mubarak, is widely seen as a means to silence a potential threat to the ruling regime. The verdict drew a swift and forceful rebuke from Washington.
WORLD
May 24, 2009 | Associated Press
A prominent Egyptian dissident said Saturday that he was attacked by a man on a motorcycle who ignited a flammable substance in his face, burning his head. Ayman Nour, one of the few liberal campaigners for democracy in Egypt, accused elements within President Hosni Mubarak's ruling party of being behind the attack Friday night. Nour said he was leaving his house in Cairo when a young man on a motorcycle called his name. When he looked toward the biker, a flame shot toward him, he said.
WORLD
May 31, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Noha El-Hennawy
Egypt's leading dissident, his forehead singed from a recent attack, sits near a window in an armchair, depressed and wondering whether he was better off behind bars. "I want to go back to jail," says Ayman Nour, whom the government released in February as an apparent goodwill gesture to the Obama administration. "The government insists on getting the maximum benefit out of my liberation, but they are causing me the maximum harm. "I am denied all rights.
WORLD
July 30, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Egyptian opposition leader Ayman Nour applied to run against President Hosni Mubarak, arriving early in the hope of being first to submit his name and gain the right to use an Islamic crescent symbol on posters and ballots. State media said Mubarak, who also wanted the crescent, submitted his nomination papers to the electoral commission ahead of Nour, sparking a controversy that soured the start of the election campaign.
WORLD
December 29, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Union said that Egypt's decision to allow a rival of President Hosni Mubarak to be convicted and sentenced to prison called into question the country's commitment to democratic reforms. Ayman Nour, leader of the liberal Al Ghad (Tomorrow) Party, was sentenced to five years on forgery charges last week. "This verdict sends negative signals about democratic political reform in Egypt.
WORLD
July 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A key prosecution witness, Ayman Hassan, testified that security services had forced him to implicate Egyptian opposition leader Ayman Nour on forgery charges. The judge quickly adjourned Nour's trial until Wednesday. Nour's defenders said the statement proved the government of President Hosni Mubarak had tried to frame Nour to eliminate him as a candidate in the upcoming presidential election. Though he has yet to announce his candidacy, Mubarak is widely expected to run for a fifth term.
OPINION
February 9, 2011 | By Tarek Masoud
What Egypt needs now, before anything else, is free parliamentary elections that can help capitalize on the momentum in Tahrir Square and give the opposition a position from which it can dictate the pace of reform. This is not something the Egyptian regime wants. Instead, Vice President Omar Suleiman would love to sit down with a wide spectrum of opposition groups ? some meaningful, many regime puppets ? and preside over negotiations for a new Egyptian constitution. He'll make sure the talks aren't just about those bits relating to the power of the president or the ability of the police to have their way with citizens.
WORLD
February 8, 2011 | By Kim Murphy and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Hopes for a road map on how to bring political reform to Egypt faded Monday, with anti-government activists casting doubt on the legitimacy of talks and thousands of protesters entering their third week as a noisy occupation force in the heart of the nation's capital. Many activists showed little confidence that the government would follow through with a pledge announced by Vice President Omar Suleiman to clamp down on corruption, widen press freedoms, lift emergency law when conditions warrant, and form a committee to amend the constitution ?
WORLD
February 4, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Jeffrey Fleishman and Laura King, Los Angeles Times
The pressure on Hosni Mubarak to release his 30-year grip on Egypt escalated on a day when some of his key allies appeared at a largely peaceful anti-government rally and the Obama administration leaned on opposition leaders to join negotiations to discuss proposals to strip the president of power. With the Egyptian president's fate uncertain and pro- and anti-Mubarak forces continuing street battles in the capital and other cities, army units chose to protect the opposition demonstrators who had fought for and won control of Cairo's Tahrir Square.
WORLD
May 31, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Noha El-Hennawy
Egypt's leading dissident, his forehead singed from a recent attack, sits near a window in an armchair, depressed and wondering whether he was better off behind bars. "I want to go back to jail," says Ayman Nour, whom the government released in February as an apparent goodwill gesture to the Obama administration. "The government insists on getting the maximum benefit out of my liberation, but they are causing me the maximum harm. "I am denied all rights.
WORLD
May 24, 2009 | Associated Press
A prominent Egyptian dissident said Saturday that he was attacked by a man on a motorcycle who ignited a flammable substance in his face, burning his head. Ayman Nour, one of the few liberal campaigners for democracy in Egypt, accused elements within President Hosni Mubarak's ruling party of being behind the attack Friday night. Nour said he was leaving his house in Cairo when a young man on a motorcycle called his name. When he looked toward the biker, a flame shot toward him, he said.
WORLD
February 19, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Noha El-Hennawy
An Egyptian dissident whose imprisonment had strained relations between Cairo and Washington for more than three years was unexpectedly freed Wednesday in an apparent goodwill gesture toward the new Obama administration. Ayman Nour, who ran against President Hosni Mubarak in 2005 and was later imprisoned on widely criticized forgery charges, was released for medical reasons, the prosecutor's office said.
WORLD
March 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
The only man who has dared to challenge Hosni Mubarak for the Egyptian presidency was charged Tuesday with forging signatures to win approval for his party, calling into question the multi-candidate election Mubarak has called for. Ayman Nour said he relished a court fight, saying it would give him a platform for his campaign and his criticism of Mubarak's regime.
OPINION
December 28, 2005
EGYPT'S STUTTER-STEPS TOWARD democracy took a great leap backward last week with the conviction of a man for the crime -- oh, the horror! -- of running against President Hosni Mubarak. International condemnation of the treatment of Ayman Nour, who was sentenced to five years in prison, may yet push Cairo to open the prison door of a candidate convicted for political reasons.
OPINION
November 24, 2008 | Natan Sharansky, Natan Sharansky, a former Soviet dissident who spent nine years in the gulag, is chairman of the Adelson Institute for Strategic Studies of the Shalem Center in Jerusalem and the author of "Defending Identity."
That barack obama is the antithesis of George W. Bush is by now axiomatic. The president-elect is expected to change everything, from the prevailing ideology to the government's order of priorities to the partisan atmosphere in Washington to even the mood in America. Amid all these differences, however, there could be an important point of convergence between Bush and Obama: supporting democracy by personally meeting with and acting on behalf of democratic dissidents.
WORLD
December 29, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Union said that Egypt's decision to allow a rival of President Hosni Mubarak to be convicted and sentenced to prison called into question the country's commitment to democratic reforms. Ayman Nour, leader of the liberal Al Ghad (Tomorrow) Party, was sentenced to five years on forgery charges last week. "This verdict sends negative signals about democratic political reform in Egypt.
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