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March 20, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Of course there's a big Bollywood-style musical finale (even though it wasn't in the original script). And naturally, there's a boisterous wedding scene, wisecracks about the Kama Sutra, a large dollop of "East-West" conflict and clothes as brilliantly hued as a tropical fruit basket. What else would you expect from a bittersweet domestic drama about multigenerational Indian migrants coping with family life in a northern England town? But if Ayub Khan-Din's play "Rafta, Rafta" fulfills certain cultural expectations, it blithely flouts others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Of course there's a big Bollywood-style musical finale (even though it wasn't in the original script). And naturally, there's a boisterous wedding scene, wisecracks about the Kama Sutra, a large dollop of "East-West" conflict and clothes as brilliantly hued as a tropical fruit basket. What else would you expect from a bittersweet domestic drama about multigenerational Indian migrants coping with family life in a northern England town? But if Ayub Khan-Din's play "Rafta, Rafta" fulfills certain cultural expectations, it blithely flouts others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2000 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a regular contributor to The Times from London
It sounds like a story so culturally specific you'd imagine it couldn't have wide appeal--a family of Anglo-Asian adolescents in the North of England in 1971, rebelling against their Pakistani father's insistence that they attend mosques and agree to arranged marriages. But "East Is East," both as a play and a film, has overcome its initially unpromising subject matter. It was a big hit on stage, first at London's Royal Court Theater, then off-Broadway at the Manhattan Theater Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2000 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a regular contributor to The Times from London
It sounds like a story so culturally specific you'd imagine it couldn't have wide appeal--a family of Anglo-Asian adolescents in the North of England in 1971, rebelling against their Pakistani father's insistence that they attend mosques and agree to arranged marriages. But "East Is East," both as a play and a film, has overcome its initially unpromising subject matter. It was a big hit on stage, first at London's Royal Court Theater, then off-Broadway at the Manhattan Theater Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2008 | From the Associated Press
LONDON -- It took five years for the Broadway musical "Hairspray" to make its way to London, but the delay didn't hurt. Just as the original swept the Tonys, so did the British version lead the field at the Laurence Olivier theater awards, taking four major prizes including best musical. Newcomer Leanne Jones was named best actress in a musical for her performance as Tracy Turnblad, a teenager who dreams of dancing away the racial divide in 1960s Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the last two decades Om Puri has become one of India's major screen actors and now he's emerging as an international star as well. In the acclaimed British comedy "My Son the Fanatic" he was a nonreligious taxi driver whose life is turned upside down when his son becomes an Islamist. Now, in "East Is East," he's the traditionalist, the Pakistani proprietor of a Manchester fish and chips shop, married 25 years to an Englishwoman (Linda Bassett), who has borne him seven children.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2000
Theater A harried reservations clerk at a four-star hotel, a high-strung maitre d', an egomaniacal chef, supermodels, Wall Street high-rollers, little old rich ladies, Hollywood producers, members of the Mafia: Mark Setlock, right, plays them all in the original New York production of "Fully Committed," Becky Mode's solo comedy directed by Nicholas Martin. Opens Friday at the Coronet Theatre. Also: Karen Morrow stars and John Bowab directs as Reprise!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2010
The "Tonight Show" war between Jay Leno and Conan O'Brien could surface again in this year's Emmy Awards. Both versions are entered for consideration as outstanding variety, music or comedy series. O'Brien left the "The Tonight Show" in January after being pushed aside when NBC decided to bring Leno back to late night. O'Brien's production company submitted his "Tonight Show" for Emmy consideration to the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, while NBC entered Leno's "Tonight Show" into the race.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
After the freshness and subtlety of "My Beautiful Laundrette"--the assured manner in which Hanif Kureishi's screenplay folded together the subjects of race, sex, age, class and money in present-day London and the deft generosity with which Stephen Frears directed it--it is no fun to report that, by whatever name, "Sammy and Rosie Get Laid" (advertised decorously in The Times and elsewhere as "Sammy and Rosie") is stunningly, ponderously bad. (It is at the Beverly Center Cineplex.
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