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NEWS
February 28, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Relative calm returned to the Armenian capital of Yerevan on Saturday after an appeal by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev to halt demonstrations backing the return of an Armenian-majority region in the adjacent republic of Azerbaijan. Factories in Yerevan were operating and street crowds, which swelled to hundreds of thousands of people during the week, were said to be smaller, Soviet television reported.
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NEWS
September 21, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Armenian member of the Soviet Congress says he will starve himself to death unless the government puts an end to martial law in the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region. "I will starve to death if nothing is done to fulfill our demands," Sos Sarkisyan, 61, an actor and member of the Congress of People's Deputies, said in the Moscow hotel room where five Armenian political figures have been on a hunger strike since last week.
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NEWS
January 18, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration said Wednesday that it does not support demands for an independent Azerbaijan and reaffirmed U.S. backing for Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in his efforts to halt fighting between Azerbaijanis and Armenians. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler, asked whether the Administration favors independence for the Azerbaijan republic, told reporters: "Since 1933, we have recognized the territorial integrity of the Soviet Union."
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gas supplies to Armenia have been cut as a result of the ethnic conflict, causing acute shortages, the government newspaper Izvestia said. The report said the main pipeline from the neighboring republic of Azerbaijan was shut down after fighting in August near the border. Izvestia said fuel supplies in Armenia were running low. Dozens of Azerbaijanis and Armenians have been killed and wounded in the ethnic clashes.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER and MASHA HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alexander Gulanerian heard the mob pounding down the hall seconds before his door was broken down and they stormed in, brandishing knives, broken bottles and lengths of pipe. Gulanerian, an Armenian living in Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan, said the intruders, without uttering a word, began beating him. They slashed his neck and his feet and threw him out of a second-story window.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Armenian Parliament, struggling for control over renegade militia groups, declared a state of emergency and outlawed the largest armed group in the republic Wednesday after an outbreak of shooting that left a lawmaker and five other people dead. The Parliament voted 170 to 0 to ban the group known as the Armenian National Army and ordered its members to turn in their weapons and vacate the building they have occupied illegally as their headquarters. The lawmakers ordered a 10 p.m.-to-6 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990
The recent fighting between Armenians and Azerbaijanis in the Soviet Caucasus "is not based on religious differences," according to a joint statement issued this week by Los Angeles-area Muslim and Armenian Christian leaders seeking to avert local disharmony. Despite the predominant Muslim faith of Azerbaijanis and Christian faith of Armenians, the crisis is based on a decades-old territorial struggle, political mistakes and injustices, the statement said.
NEWS
February 9, 1990
With tensions, arsenals and armies escalating rapidly and possibly out of control, regional Armenian and Azerbaijani party and government leaders agreed to meet under Soviet supervision to negotiate a way to limit, if not eliminate, the increasing threat of civil war. At one point, nine days after the initial bloodshed in Baku, the official leaders did agree to remove armed groups from their borders, restore damaged communication lines and resume rail traffic.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | From Associated Press
Armenian negotiators broke off informal peace talks with Azerbaijanis and headed home Sunday after accusing them of pressuring Armenians to evacuate two villages in Azerbaijan, a participant said. Armenian leaders also said that the Armenian All-National Movement is refusing to ratify an agreement to seek a peaceful settlement of the conflict and exchange information on hostages.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government, struggling to re-establish its authority in the southern republics of Armenia and Azerbaijan, on Thursday put its armed forces there on a wartime footing and mobilized reservists as the fighting between Armenian and Azerbaijani militias grew. Gen. Dmitri T.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armenia's fledgling nationalist government, winning a crucial battle to impose its authority, surrounded a private militia's headquarters Thursday and disarmed scores of its members in an attempt to halt deadly gun battles in Yerevan, the capital. It was the first true test for the pro-independence government of Levon Ter-Petrosyan, who earlier this month persuaded Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Armenian Parliament, struggling for control over renegade militia groups, declared a state of emergency and outlawed the largest armed group in the republic Wednesday after an outbreak of shooting that left a lawmaker and five other people dead. The Parliament voted 170 to 0 to ban the group known as the Armenian National Army and ordered its members to turn in their weapons and vacate the building they have occupied illegally as their headquarters. The lawmakers ordered a 10 p.m.-to-6 a.m.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Troops fired at rock-throwing demonstrators in the disputed southern territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, the official Tass news agency reported. Two civilians and seven soldiers and police were injured, it said. Tass said the incident occurred in Stepanakert, capital of the mainly Armenian enclave inside Azerbaijan. It said about 1,000 people gathered outside a military office to demand the release of two Armenians detained for addressing a rally earlier in the week.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their heavy armored plating and tractor treads, they may look like tanks. With the full-throated roar of their engines, they sound like tanks. And, as they speed cross-country at 20 m.p.h., virtually unhindered by the hilly terrain, they certainly move like tanks. But, in the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh in the southern Soviet Union, these tank look-alikes are officially designated "agricultural towing vehicles."
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Reuters
Twelve mutilated corpses, 11 of them Armenians from a home for invalids, have been found in a sand pit in Soviet Azerbaijan, the official news agency Tass said Friday. Tass did not say who was suspected of the killings. But the corpses--11 women and one man--appeared to be victims of an ethnic conflict between Armenians and Azerbaijanis that has claimed hundreds of casualties over the past two years. Eleven were identified as handicapped Armenians who disappeared Jan.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A visitor does not have to spend much time here in the capital of Azerbaijan to understand why President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said last week that no other problem in the last two years has commanded as much Kremlin attention as the Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict. Baku, now in the fourth week of a state of emergency imposed after a bloody anti-Armenian uprising by Azerbaijanis, gives new meaning to the word intractable.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The violent conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan has galvanized Armenian opposition groups, who have virtually supplanted the Communist Party leadership and taken the defense of their embattled republic into their own hands. Under the leadership of the militant Karabakh Committee, the Armenia All-National Movement is recruiting a volunteer army.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anxious to retain U.S. understanding of Moscow's military crackdown in Azerbaijan, Soviet Ambassador Yuri V. Dubinin told a hastily called news conference Monday that Soviet forces intervened in the ethnically divided region only to end bloodshed and restore peace. Dubinin specifically denied that troops had been sent in to crush a takeover attempt by Azerbaijani nationalists, as the Kremlin's top military officer said last week.
NEWS
February 9, 1990
With tensions, arsenals and armies escalating rapidly and possibly out of control, regional Armenian and Azerbaijani party and government leaders agreed to meet under Soviet supervision to negotiate a way to limit, if not eliminate, the increasing threat of civil war. At one point, nine days after the initial bloodshed in Baku, the official leaders did agree to remove armed groups from their borders, restore damaged communication lines and resume rail traffic.
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