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Azidothymidine

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NEWS
March 22, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
A mysterious "virus-like agent" detected in AIDS patients has been described in detail by a team of federal researchers, who suggest that their findings may challenge prevailing wisdom on what causes AIDS. The researchers, at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and the National Institutes of Health, said the agent may represent a new infection striking people with damaged immune systems, or may play "a more fundamental role as a co-factor" in triggering AIDS. "Our . . .
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NEWS
March 22, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
A mysterious "virus-like agent" detected in AIDS patients has been described in detail by a team of federal researchers, who suggest that their findings may challenge prevailing wisdom on what causes AIDS. The researchers, at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and the National Institutes of Health, said the agent may represent a new infection striking people with damaged immune systems, or may play "a more fundamental role as a co-factor" in triggering AIDS. "Our . . .
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NEWS
September 26, 1986
More than 7,300 AIDS victims and their doctors inundated a national hot line during its first six days in hopes of getting permission to use a promising new drug called azidothymidine, or AZT, officials at the National Institutes of Health said. The hot line was set up last Friday after federal health officials announced that AZT would be made widely available. It had shown dramatic results in a six-month controlled study of 146 patients suffering from AIDS.
NEWS
September 22, 1988
The Long Beach City Council has approved an agreement with a pharmacy to add another $100,000 to the funds available for distribution of the drug AZT to AIDS patients. The latest augmentation of funds for the experimental prescription drug Azidothymidine follows an agreement approved last month with Stuckey Pharmacy to allocate up to $55,781 for distribution of the drug. The city is financing the program with grants from the state Department of Health Services.
NEWS
March 23, 1987 | United Press International
Burroughs Wellcome Co., concerned about an undersupply of its newly approved AIDS drug Retrovir, announced a unique distribution program today in which patients will need code numbers to fill prescriptions. Company officials said at a news conference that starting Wednesday doctors will have to apply to the company for permission to prescribe Retrovir, the trade name for azidothymidine or AZT, the only drug on the market for acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
October 2, 1985
An experimental new drug stops the AIDS virus from reproducing and attacking blood cells in the laboratory, and initial tests show it can be given safely to AIDS victims, researchers said. "I think this is very promising. This is one of the most potent drugs" against the AIDS virus, Dr. Hiroaki Mitsuya of the National Cancer Institute said. "The advantage of this agent is that it is less toxic in vitro," or in the test tube, than other experimental AIDS medicines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1988 | RAYMOND L. SANCHEZ
The state Department of Health Services has raised the income ceiling for the federally funded AZT drug program, enabling more San Diegans with AIDS and AIDS-related complex to receive the expensive drug that makes the disease more bearable. Dr. Donald G. Ramras, deputy director for the San Diego County Public Health Services, said that, effective Feb. 1, anyone who makes $22,000 or less a year can qualify for financial assistance to receive azidothymidine, or AZT, treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1988
California has relaxed the financial guidelines for receiving free a drug that can suppress the complications of AIDS, Dr. L. Rex Ehling, Orange County public health director, has announced. Patients with AIDS or those ill because of infection from the acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus may receive the drug AZT free from the Orange County Health Care Agency if they earn $40,000 or less each year, Ehling said.
NEWS
January 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration is putting a top priority on development of drugs to combat AIDS, even if it means delaying the processing of applications for other types of pharmaceuticals, FDA Commissioner Frank Young said Friday. Young said the agency is putting "the highest possible priority" on clearing candidate drugs for treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome, but he said the war on the fatal disease will be a long and difficult one.
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