Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAzores
IN THE NEWS

Azores

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
June 25, 1989 | FRANK RILEY, Riley is travel columnist for Los Angeles magazine and a regular contributor to this section
Could these lonely Atlantic Ocean islands be part of the legendary Lost Continent of Atlantis? Certainly the Azores have a lengthy history. The Phoenicians knew about them in the 6th Century BC, Norse sailors came across them hundreds of years later, and they appear on an Italian map of 1351. But could Plato possibly have been referring to these scattered isles when he wrote of a continent and civilization wiped out by an earthquake around the 10th mil- lennium BC, leaving only a few island remnants in the Western Ocean?
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
December 10, 2013 | By Amina Khan
An incredibly rare butterfly orchid has been "rediscovered" on a volcano ridge in the Azores, a remote group of European islands, and scientists are naming it after the man who first found it nearly 200 years ago. The newly discovered Platanthera azorica , described in the journal PeerJ, is in serious need of environmental protection, the study authors write. The researchers had originally intended to study the orchid species on the Azores, a group of nine islands off the coast of the Iberian peninsula, to understand their origin.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
December 10, 2013 | By Amina Khan
An incredibly rare butterfly orchid has been "rediscovered" on a volcano ridge in the Azores, a remote group of European islands, and scientists are naming it after the man who first found it nearly 200 years ago. The newly discovered Platanthera azorica , described in the journal PeerJ, is in serious need of environmental protection, the study authors write. The researchers had originally intended to study the orchid species on the Azores, a group of nine islands off the coast of the Iberian peninsula, to understand their origin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
Ask any forcado why he stands unarmed in front of a charging bull and he'll tell you he's crazy. Anyone watching would have to agree. The Portuguese-style bullfighters don't use spears or swords. They rely instead on brotherhood and synchronized steps. They don't try to kill the 1,100-pound animal. They jump on its head, pull its tail and spin it into a dizzy stupor. The forcados make their stand in festa bravas (bullfights) in the dusty dairy towns of Central California, places like Stevinson, Gustine and Laton, where the Azores islanders live.
NEWS
August 23, 1987
Hurricane Arlene headed toward the cooler waters of the North Atlantic, while Tropical Storm Bret lost its punch and was downgraded to a tropical depression, forecasters said. At 6 p.m. Saturday, Arlene was about 500 miles west of the westernmost islands of the Azores and moving about 20 m.p.h., with reported wind gusts of about 75 m.p.h., said Gil Clark, forecaster with the National Hurricane Center in Miami. Clark said there is no danger of Arlene hitting land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2010 | By Diana Marcum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Turlock, Calif. Joe Fagundes, a 66-year-old Central Valley dairy cow broker, likes to joke around. For four decades he has carried a photo of a most unfortunate-looking woman in his wallet, gleefully showing it to strangers as his "beautiful wife" or "lovely daughter." He makes city kids whip around by shouting "Hey, look at that blue cow!" And Fagundes was just joshing when he invented International Fava Bean Day. The latter is a joke gone right. His yarn grew faster than Jack's famous beanstalk (which food scholars believe was most likely inspired by fava beans)
NEWS
September 3, 1986 | United Press International
Torrential rains and flooding killed three people, injured an undetermined number and washed away homes and bridges on the Azores island of Sao Miguel, officials said Tuesday.
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | Associated Press
An earthquake measuring 5.8 on the Richter scale rocked the Azores archipelago in the mid-Atlantic on Monday, damaging some buildings on the largest island, officials said. No injuries were reported.
NEWS
December 6, 1986 | From Reuters
A farm worker was hospitalized here Friday with a broken leg after the first road accident on a tiny Azores island that boasts only two cars and a dozen tractors. A hospital spokesman on Terceira, one of the main islands of the Portuguese mid-Atlantic archipelago, said that Joao Mendes, 32, was recovering after being flown here from Corvo.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The commander of a major U.S. air base on Portugal's mid-Atlantic Azores islands has been relieved of command and is being investigated, the Air Force said. Spokeswoman Maj. Ginger Blazicko did not say what prompted the investigation of Col. Melvin M. Reeves, which began Nov. 7. She said Reeves was removed late last month because Lt. Gen. Phillip J. Ford, commander of the 8th Air Force in Barksdale, La., "lost confidence in Reeves' ability and fitness to command."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2010 | By Diana Marcum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Turlock, Calif. Joe Fagundes, a 66-year-old Central Valley dairy cow broker, likes to joke around. For four decades he has carried a photo of a most unfortunate-looking woman in his wallet, gleefully showing it to strangers as his "beautiful wife" or "lovely daughter." He makes city kids whip around by shouting "Hey, look at that blue cow!" And Fagundes was just joshing when he invented International Fava Bean Day. The latter is a joke gone right. His yarn grew faster than Jack's famous beanstalk (which food scholars believe was most likely inspired by fava beans)
TRAVEL
November 26, 2006
"I was privileged to visit the nine unique islands of the Azores in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, which is like returning to a primeval paradise where man and nature come together as one. The lakes, the flowers, the mountains, the vineyards, the climates created a distinct environment. I traveled with Al and Ginny Dutra, a couple in their 70s whose tour company specializes in Portugal and the Azores." Tours are about $3,000 per person plus airfare (prices for 2007 still being set).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | Nick Owchar, Times Staff Writer
It's gotten to the point of being a cliche: Whenever an author engages in some form of storytelling magic that involves levitating priests or a rain of flower petals, critics dub him a literary offspring of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The South American maestro is cited so often, in fact, that he's fathered more children than Methuselah.
OPINION
March 18, 2003
Re "Azores Summit Ends in Ultimatum to U.N.," March 17: Webster's defines "diplomacy" as "the art and practice of conducting negotiations between nations." But the Bush administration seems to have its own definition of the word. President Bush's "final diplomatic effort" has nothing to do with negotiating a peaceful solution to the standoff with Iraq and everything to do with seeking political cover for his rush to war. While claiming he didn't need United Nations approval anyway, Bush said he would call for an immediate vote on a new resolution, daring Security Council members to "show their cards."
WORLD
March 17, 2003 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
President Bush and the leaders of Britain and Spain said Sunday that they would give the United Nations until the end of today to authorize the use of military force against Iraq or they would go to war without U.N. approval. "Tomorrow is a moment of truth for the world," Bush said at the end of a hastily arranged hourlong summit at this blustery U.S. air base in Portugal's Azores islands.
WORLD
March 15, 2003 | Robin Wright, Edwin Chen and Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writers
The White House announced Friday that it would make a "last push" for peace at a summit Sunday in the Azores with allies Britain and Spain, but U.S. officials acknowledged that the United States is now resigned to the failure of its diplomatic efforts on Iraq and is preparing to go to war without a U.N. resolution.
TRAVEL
November 26, 2006
"I was privileged to visit the nine unique islands of the Azores in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, which is like returning to a primeval paradise where man and nature come together as one. The lakes, the flowers, the mountains, the vineyards, the climates created a distinct environment. I traveled with Al and Ginny Dutra, a couple in their 70s whose tour company specializes in Portugal and the Azores." Tours are about $3,000 per person plus airfare (prices for 2007 still being set).
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Investigators reportedly are focusing on pilot and controller errors and confusing radio exchanges as likely causes of an airliner crash in the Azores earlier this month that killed 144 people. The New York Times, in its Saturday editions, reported that tape recordings of conversations between the pilots and air controllers indicate the pilots believed they had been cleared to descend to 2,000 feet, when in fact the controllers had said 3,000 feet.
FOOD
October 25, 2000 | DAVID LEITE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I get all kinds of responses when I tell people where I'm from. My favorite was uttered at a party by a young woman swathed in a gauzy, tie-dyed dress who was eating an alarming amount of hummus: "Oh, the Azores! You know, they're the remains of the lost city of Atlantis. I lived there in a past life." Most people know surprisingly little about my family's homeland, and even less about our food.
TRAVEL
January 23, 2000 | LOIS BRUNNER BASTIAN, Lois Brunner Bastian is a freelance writer living in New Jersey
As my husband, Edward, and I waited at a bus stop, we chatted with a local man in English and broken Portuguese. Obviously puzzled, the man suddenly asked, "Are you a little bit Portuguese?" We were charmed by the way he put his question, one that was asked of us often during a three-week exploration of the Azores.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|