Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsB 24 Bomber Airplane
IN THE NEWS

B 24 Bomber Airplane

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the ugly duckling of the World War II bombers, always overshadowed by its more famous sisters. But if the truth be known, according to those who flew it, the B-24 Liberator was the war's workhorse. It could take punishment that the B-17 Flying Fortress and the B-29 Superfortress never could. On Thursday, the only fully restored B-24 in the world flew into John Wayne Airport and rolled to a stop at Martin Aviation, where it will be on display today and Saturday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2001 | JASON SONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The past came roaring back for Nelson Woodford when two vintage World War II bombers landed Sunday at John Wayne Airport. "Man, what I'd give to be in one of these things again," Woodford, 68, a retired Air Force sergeant, said as he stood near a B-24 bomber. "If I could join the Air Force again right now I'd do it." Like hundreds of others, Woodford came to the airport for a glimpse of the past.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2001 | JASON SONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The past came roaring back for Nelson Woodford when two vintage World War II bombers landed Sunday at John Wayne Airport. "Man, what I'd give to be in one of these things again," Woodford, 68, a retired Air Force sergeant, said as he stood near a B-24 bomber. "If I could join the Air Force again right now I'd do it." Like hundreds of others, Woodford came to the airport for a glimpse of the past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999 | ELEANOR YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It starts as a purr. The four propellers hum into action, two on either side of the B-17. It's not much louder than a crowded restaurant, but there's the shaking, like a mild earthquake that doesn't stop. Then, as the bomber reaches 100 mph and lifts off the runway, the rumble grows into a bone-jarring rattle. It's as loud as being in the belly of a tank. The bomber, built just before the end of World War II, is one of two at John Wayne Airport this month, open to the public for tours and rides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999 | ELEANOR YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It starts as a purr. The four propellers hum into action, two on either side of the B-17. It's not much louder than a crowded restaurant, but there's the shaking, like a mild earthquake that doesn't stop. Then, as the bomber reaches 100 mph and lifts off the runway, the rumble grows into a bone-jarring rattle. It's as loud as being in the belly of a tank. The bomber, built just before the end of World War II, is one of two at John Wayne Airport this month, open to the public for tours and rides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1998 | BORIS YARO
"We used to be real scared of these planes," Anna Ohler of North Hollywood said of the B-24 she got a ride in Friday at Burbank Airport. Ohler, a retired legal secretary, saw World War II from the other end--the German end. She was a 17-year-old girl in Berlin when it began. "The war started on my birthday. Some present, huh?" What she remembers most of the war years was cowering in bomb shelters from 1942 to 1945, listening to the American and British bombers dropping their lethal loads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1996 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a brief moment Thursday, as the restored World War II bombers appeared on the horizon en route to John Wayne Airport, 78-year-old Al Olivari was 25 again. At that age, he was a gunner assigned to shoot down enemy aircraft from behind a thin plexiglass shield in the nose of a B-17 Flying Fortress. "It was noisy as hell, and ice cold in there," he yelled as the vintage B-17 and B-24 Liberator circled in a thundering air display.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1996 | JACK CHEEVERS
Young boys cheered as the mighty bombers lumbered overhead. Old man's fingers curled around the triggers of machine guns they hadn't touched in more than 50 years. Even a German- born woman who endured the bombers' lethal payloads showed up. Hundreds of people turned out Sunday and Monday to view two restored World War II -a B-17 Flying Fortress and a B-24 Liberator -at Van Nuys Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1998 | BORIS YARO
"We used to be real scared of these planes," Anna Ohler of North Hollywood said of the B-24 she got a ride in Friday at Burbank Airport. Ohler, a retired legal secretary, saw World War II from the other end--the German end. She was a 17-year-old girl in Berlin when it began. "The war started on my birthday. Some present, huh?" What she remembers most of the war years was cowering in bomb shelters from 1942 to 1945, listening to the American and British bombers dropping their lethal loads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1996 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a brief moment Thursday, as the restored World War II bombers appeared on the horizon en route to John Wayne Airport, 78-year-old Al Olivari was 25 again. At that age, he was a gunner assigned to shoot down enemy aircraft from behind a thin plexiglass shield in the nose of a B-17 Flying Fortress. "It was noisy as hell, and ice cold in there," he yelled as the vintage B-17 and B-24 Liberator circled in a thundering air display.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1996 | JACK CHEEVERS
Young boys cheered as the mighty bombers lumbered overhead. Old man's fingers curled around the triggers of machine guns they hadn't touched in more than 50 years. Even a German- born woman who endured the bombers' lethal payloads showed up. Hundreds of people turned out Sunday and Monday to view two restored World War II -a B-17 Flying Fortress and a B-24 Liberator -at Van Nuys Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the ugly duckling of the World War II bombers, always overshadowed by its more famous sisters. But if the truth be known, according to those who flew it, the B-24 Liberator was the war's workhorse. It could take punishment that the B-17 Flying Fortress and the B-29 Superfortress never could. On Thursday, the only fully restored B-24 in the world flew into John Wayne Airport and rolled to a stop at Martin Aviation, where it will be on display today and Saturday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|