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B B King

ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When it comes to American treasures, rank B.B. King right up there with the Grand Canyon and baseball. The bluesman is one of the most masterful singers and instrumentalists this nation has produced, and he never seems to take his gifts for granted.
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BOOKS
January 22, 1995
Regarding Charles Solomon's "Paperbacks" review of "Mississippi History" (Oct. 30), please be advised that "Yarbrough's fictional Delta town of Indianola" is, indeed, not fictional but an existing town. Further, it is where famed blues singer B.B. King is from! LAWRENCE COHN, BEVERLY HILLS
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1997
If blues guitar is your bag, you might want to check out former Albert Collins sidekick Debbie Davies when she brings her own band to B. B. King's on Friday night. Davies has garnered critical raves for her razor-sharp lead guitar work as well as her vocals and songwriting. She has received four W.C. Handy Award nominations for best contemporary female blues artist since 1991. She has recorded three CDs, and her latest, "I Got That Feeling," is available on Blind Pig Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1985 | LEONARD FEATHER
How do you like your blues served up? Greasy or gritty? Fast and funky, or blue and sentimental? Instrumental or vocal? Male or female? Whatever one's predilection, the B. B. King show has the recipe. At the Tuesday opening of his Concerts by the Sea engagement (closing tonight) he drew a standing ovation simply for walking on stage, and kept the capacity crowd in his thrall for better than an hour. The career of the blues king has long moved in a steady direction.
NEWS
February 21, 2012 | By Connie Stewart
That Al Green tune was just the beginning. Weeks after President Obama sang a snippet of the soul hit “Let's Stay Together” during a fundraiser at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, he ventured into the blues Tuesday night. Maybe he was emboldened by the man who offered him the microphone: Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones. Maybe it was because Buddy Guy brought up Al Green, telling the president, “You done started something and you gotta keep it up now.” Next thing you know, Obama took the mic in hand and crooned, “Come on, baby, don't you want to go” - twice.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009 | By Richard Abowitz
As Garth Brooks' much-hyped return dominated the news, and all things Vegas focused on the opening of CityCenter, a little blues club and restaurant had a celebration at the Mirage last weekend. A VIP line formed stretching down a hallway an hour before the doors opened for the invitation-only grand opening of the latest, fifth outpost of B.B. King's Blues Club. The night promised to be special as the legendary performer would cap it by taking the tiny stage in the small club -- laid out with a restaurant, dance floor and a bar in the back -- to lead an all-star jam. As the line grew, King reflected on his career and the genre in a VIP suite, interrupting himself to check out the scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1995 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA
Putting B.B. King's Blues Club in CityWalk presents on obvious dichotomy--black music born out of poverty is offered in the moneyed mecca of Universal City. The reasoning behind the CityWalk location is clear--there's money in them thar tourist traps. And for folks who simply want to hear the music, B.B. King's is a terrific, breathtaking club, with great sight lines and sumptuous Southern food.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A documentary of blues man B. B. King's life, produced for the British Broadcasting Co.'s "Omnibus" television series, had its world premiere in his hometown. Proceeds from $10 ticket sales for the one-hour film will go to Indianola's parks. Nearly 100 people turned out for the film, which was shown at the Mid-Delta Arts Assn. theater. The film has yet to be broadcast in England. Much of the film about the blues musician was filmed in Indianola.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1985
Lloyd Glenn, a well-known blues pianist who appeared regularly at Los Angeles clubs, at the Monterey Jazz Festival and in the Hollywood Bowl, died Thursday of a heart attack in a Los Angeles hospital. Glenn, 76, fronted some of his own small groups while also playing behind Big Joe Turner, B. B. King and with Kid Ory. A native of Texas who was self-taught, he came to Los Angeles during World War II to work in the area's defense plants.
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