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B K S Iyengar

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August 5, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
People who do yoga tend not to read about yoga. The practice requires such presence of mind, such immediacy, that reading about it seems peripheral. Squinting at fuzzy diagrams on a page is rarely helpful. There are no shortcuts, even for the most acute intellectuals. You just have to do it. B.K.S. Iyengar is 83 years old. He has been teaching yoga since he was 17. Today, 180 institutes around the world bear his name.
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August 5, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
People who do yoga tend not to read about yoga. The practice requires such presence of mind, such immediacy, that reading about it seems peripheral. Squinting at fuzzy diagrams on a page is rarely helpful. There are no shortcuts, even for the most acute intellectuals. You just have to do it. B.K.S. Iyengar is 83 years old. He has been teaching yoga since he was 17. Today, 180 institutes around the world bear his name.
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NEWS
October 3, 1991 | GREGORY DENNIS
Yoga developed as part of the Hindu religious tradition about 2,000 years ago. Like many other things Eastern, it came to widespread public awareness in the West during the 1960s, in a form adapted to Western lifestyles and thinking. "Light on Yoga," a book by the Indian yoga teacher B.K.S. Iyengar, played a key role in popularizing yoga in North America.
HEALTH
October 10, 2005 | Stacie Stukin, Special to The Times
As the 86-year-old teacher drew closer to the fans cordoned off with yellow police tape at Los Angeles International Airport, the cheering and clapping grew louder. The group of about 30 people, surrounded by six LAPD officers, had been eagerly awaiting the arrival -- the first in 12 years -- of the yoga master from Pune, India. When B.K.S. Iyengar finally walked up to the adoring group, many bowed down and touched his sandal-clad feet in adulation.
NEWS
August 18, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The '80s boom in aerobics videos brought us leotard-clad celebrities galore, frenetically bouncing to disco beats and exhorting viewers to "feel the burn." In contrast, the '90s are bringing along a new kind of fitness video--one that moves at a slower, calmer pace while emphasizing mental as well as physical well-being. The leotards are still there, but the music is tinkling New Age stuff, and the movements are fluid and controlled rather than fast and beat-conscious.
HEALTH
April 4, 2005 | John Rosenthal, Special to The Times
I first came to yoga a few years ago, while living in New York City. I was mystified by the number of different styles, so I sampled several of them: Kundalini, Iyengar, Anusara, some that were the unique recipes of the instructor and some that were closer to Pilates. Some styles struck me as too heavy on chanting, while others left me with severe back pain. I didn't go back to those classes. Eventually, I chose Iyengar as my favorite.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1987 | PADDY CALISTRO
After a surge of interest during the consciousness-conscious '60s, yoga began to fall out of favor. Exercisers apparently lost patience with the activity, which offers slow but steady results, and turned to the fast pace and quick shape-up of aerobics. Now yoga is back--less mystical than in the past, less reminiscent of gurus in pretzel positions, and more attractive than ever to people who are interested in working out rather than working toward some spiritual goal.
MAGAZINE
March 6, 1988 | EVE BABITZ, Eve Babitz is a Los Angeles writer
WHEN YOU live in L.A. you occasionally run into people who have lost lots of weight, started exercising and suddenly look as though they've been run backward through a time machine--which was what must have happened to my old friend Karen. I barely recognized her when I ran into her at an art opening a few years back. But then, Karen had gone too far, for not only was she slender and willowy, she also seemed to possess something else--an alarming grace. Whereas I didn't even have a flat stomach.
HEALTH
May 29, 2006 | Stacie Stukin, Special to The Times
ANUSARA students will tell you their style of yoga is more than just exercise. It's a community -- one of like-minded people who accentuate the positive as the route toward spiritual and physical well-being. Among the believers is B.J. Galvin, who last month drove six hours from Carefree, Ariz., with her two sons so that they could attend founder John Friend's weekend workshop in Los Angeles. The L.A.
HEALTH
September 10, 2004 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
When software was hot, they worked at an educational software company for kids. And when the Internet went wild, they worked together at one of the earliest search engines. When that boom busted, entrepreneurs George Lichter and Rob Wrubel went searching for the next big thing. They looked for a wide-open market, ripe to be plucked. And all the while they worked through their own stress-related ailments with deep breathing, sun salutations and downward-facing dogs.
HEALTH
December 24, 2001 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I am a stressed-out corporate employee who spends far too much time growing pallid under fluorescent lights, mushing my intestines together eight hours a day in my chair, burning my eyeballs out in front of a computer screen, and steadily tightening my forearms as I pound away on my keyboard like a frustrated classical pianist. During this holiday season my shoulders have only grown more humped, my overtaxed adrenal glands more productive. I needed help. Not just for my body, but for my head.
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