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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Witney, the Republic Pictures action director who made the studio's greatest cliffhanger serials during its B-movie heyday in the 1930s and '40s and introduced the now-standard practice of choreographing fight scenes, died Sunday in a nursing home in Jackson, Calif. He was 86. Witney, who had been in ill health since suffering a stroke in 1995, died of complications from that stroke and several subsequent ones.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1995 | Bill Whitaker
Walk down the dark, crumbling corridors of Mosfilm Studios and, for a moment, you might think you've entered Frankenstein's castle. The music filling the air would certainly underscore that feeling. Behind heavily guarded studio doors, the Moscow Symphony Orchestra has been recording music from the 1944 Boris Karloff horror film "House of Frankenstein."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
On Friday, the world - or at least the Internet - was still reeling in the wake of “Sharknado,” the cheesy Syfy original movie that everyone, or at least it seemed online, was watching Thursday night. Though its ratings were relatively modest, even for cable, it was nothing less than a phenomenon on Twitter, where it racked up mentions at a rate appraching the infamous Red Wedding episode of "Game of Thrones. " But the HBO hit at least benefited from a huge built-in audience of fans, the anticipation of fans who'd read the books and knew what was in store, and the spectacularly violent events it portrayed.
SPORTS
November 25, 1990 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
Mater Dei stunned Eisenhower. Tustin trounced Pacifica. Valencia outwitted La Quinta . . . Still, you say that you spent Friday night watching a herd of giant, carnivorous rabbits attack Arizona? ("Night of the Lepus," 1972 horror flick starring Janet Leigh, cable). For shame. The Southern Section football playoffs are entering their third week, Orange County, and 11 local teams remain. Semifinals start Friday, so get thee to a game. Need reasons? Here are 10: 1. Running backs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Noel Murray
Prometheus 20th Century Fox, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99/$49.99 Available on VOD beginning Oct. 11 The dopiest and most awe-inspiring blockbuster of this past summer, director Ridley Scott's "Prometheus" is both a prequel to and remake of Scott's sci-fi/horror classic "Alien," following a new group of space explorers as they encounter a malevolent force threatening all humankind. Noomi Rapace plays a scientist who thinks she's discovered the planet where all life began, and travels there with a crew more interested in getting paid than finding "God.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four years Odette Springer, an elegant classically trained musician and opera singer, was musical supervisor at Roger Corman's Concorde/New Horizons Pictures--until she discovered she was becoming turned on by the constant flow of images of sex and violence that confronted her daily in her work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Kimbrough, 87, a Texas A&M football great who starred in two B-westerns in the 1940s and became a Texas state legislator, died of pneumonia Monday in Haskell, Texas. Dubbed the "Haskell Hurricane," Kimbrough was a fullback for Texas A&M's 1939 national championship team. In 1940, he finished second to the University of Michigan's Tom Harmon in the Heisman Trophy balloting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Anthony Eisley, the tall, dark and handsome mustachioed actor best remembered as half of television's glamorous detective duo on the series "Hawaiian Eye," has died. He was 78. Eisley, who played Tracy Steele to Robert Conrad's Tom Lopaka in the show, which ran from 1959 to 1963, died Wednesday in Woodland Hills of unspecified causes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2011 | Valerie J. Nelson
Yvette Vickers, an actress best known as the femme fatale in two late 1950s cult horror films, "Attack of the 50 Foot Woman" and "Attack of the Giant Leeches," was found dead Wednesday at her Benedict Canyon home. She was 82. The body's mummified state suggests that she could have been dead for close to a year, police said. Residents on the street said they had not seen Vickers since last summer, said actress Susan Savage, a neighbor who discovered the body. An autopsy will be conducted to determine the cause of death, but police say foul play is not suspected.
NEWS
September 27, 1987
Hollywood came to Long Beach recently to get clearance for making a movie, which would have meant a week's shooting here. That would have meant almost $20,000 for the city, and inestimable great publicity. But the City Council expected the movie company to wait around a week for clearance, and Councilman Edd Tuttle wanted assurance that the producer would give credits for the location. The producer canceled the shoot and went to Los Angeles, where the powers are not so unsophisticated about the value of a movie on their turf.
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