Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsB Movie
IN THE NEWS

B Movie

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2009
Pamela Blake Actress in action serials Pamela Blake, 94, a B-movie actress known for her roles in such late 1940s action serials as "Chick Carter, Detective" and "Ghost of Zorro," died of natural causes Tuesday at a Las Vegas care facility, her family said. Born in 1915 in Oakland, Blake came to Hollywood after winning a beauty contest at age 17. Originally known by her given name, Adele Pearce, she adopted the stage name Pamela Blake in 1942, the same year she signed with MGM, according to the All Movie Internet database.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2009 | Dennis Lim
John Carpenter, who has not directed a feature film since "Ghosts of Mars" in 2001, seems to recede further into the margins of American pop culture with each passing year. Even in the more productive phases of his career, he was damned with faint praise, as a B-movie or horror specialist who never matched the promise of his breakthrough film, the slasher landmark "Halloween." This was not lost on Carpenter, who supposedly once observed that while he's considered an auteur in Europe, "in the U.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2009 | John Horn
Surprise disappearances drive the plot in the illusionist crime drama "Magic Man," but the vanishing act at the film's initial Cannes market screening Wednesday was hardly what its filmmakers wanted to see. Occupying the very first screening slot in the Marche, as the sprawling market component of the Cannes Film Festival is known, "Magic Man" had come to the south of France looking for distributors from around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | Michael Sragow, Baltimore Sun
The great Sam Peckinpah once said, "It's not just blowing up a bridge, it's the way you blow up a bridge." That's how I feel about apocalyptic or dystopian movies. It's not just blowing up the world, it's the way you blow up the world. Pundits questioned Pixar's decision to base "Wall-E" on a trash-strewn Earth, a robot hero and humans who've evolved into pudding pops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2008 | Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
For the last six years, few plots in Hollywood have kept more power brokers and entertainment lawyers in suspense than the FBI investigation into onetime private eye to the stars Anthony Pellicano. With alleged victims including actors Sylvester Stallone and Keith Carradine and secret grand jury testimony from the likes of super-agent Mike Ovitz and studio executives Brad Grey and Ron Meyer, the case was seen by many as the entertainment industry's biggest scandal in decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2007 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jeanne Carmen, 77, a 1950s pinup girl and B-movie actress, died Thursday of lymphoma at her Irvine home, her son, Brandon James, told the Associated Press. Born Aug. 4, 1930, in Paragould, Ark., Carmen picked cotton with her family before running away at 13. The small-town girl with measurements of 36-26-36 was still a teenager when she arrived in New York and began dancing in burlesque shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nicholas Worth, 69, an imposing character actor who often played the darkest of villains in such B movies as "Don't Answer the Phone!" (1980), died of heart failure Monday at Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys, said his friend Jack Stern. Worth debuted in "For Pete's Sake" (1966) and appeared in almost 90 films and television productions. He was in "Swamp Thing" (1982), "The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad!" (1988) and "Darkman" (1990).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Andy Sidaris, 76, an Emmy Award-winning director for ABC Sports who moved on to make B-movies in a genre he called "Bullets, Bombs and Babes," died Wednesday of throat cancer, his wife, Arlene, told the Associated Press. Known for his ebullient personality and creative approach to televised sports, Sidaris directed the first broadcast of ABC's "Wide World of Sports" in 1961.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2006 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Few places in the broad sweep of Southern California encapsulate the nexus of movies and real life as sweetly as this little enclave of Old West facades and New West ranch houses, home to some 350 people who revel in the isolation of the high desert and Hollywood's romanticized version of life on the frontier. The town was built 60 years ago as a self-contained film site for B-westerns, the familiar squared-off facades hiding real homes in which the casts and crews could live during shoots.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|