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February 20, 1991 | Chris Woodyard and Anne Michaud/Times staff writers
Foreclosure Request: A creditor of B.P. John Furniture Co. on Tuesday asked a federal bankruptcy judge in Santa Ana to allow it to foreclose on the company. The 100-year-old Santa Ana furniture company, which until recently employed 258 people, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from its creditors on Nov. 16. It closed down manufacturing operations last month, laying off all but two dozen employees, and is liquidating its inventory. Bankruptcy Court Judge John E.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 1991 | Chris Woodyard and Anne Michaud/Times staff writers
Foreclosure Request: A creditor of B.P. John Furniture Co. on Tuesday asked a federal bankruptcy judge in Santa Ana to allow it to foreclose on the company. The 100-year-old Santa Ana furniture company, which until recently employed 258 people, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from its creditors on Nov. 16. It closed down manufacturing operations last month, laying off all but two dozen employees, and is liquidating its inventory. Bankruptcy Court Judge John E.
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BUSINESS
November 1, 1990 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three suppliers of B.P. John Furniture Co., which employs 258 people in Santa Ana, have asked a federal bankruptcy court judge to liquidate the company because it owes them more than $100,000. The suppliers said Wednesday that they filed the involuntary bankruptcy petition because they feared that the proposed sale of the 99-year-old furniture maker and distributor would make it more difficult to obtain payment of their bills.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1990 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three suppliers of B.P. John Furniture Co., which employs 258 people in Santa Ana, have asked a federal bankruptcy court judge to liquidate the company because it owes them more than $100,000. The suppliers said Wednesday that they filed the involuntary bankruptcy petition because they feared that the proposed sale of the 99-year-old furniture maker and distributor would make it more difficult to obtain payment of their bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1987
If employers were wondering how Harold Ezell, western regional commissioner for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, was going to handle the worker's documentation provisions of the new immigration law, they got their answer Tuesday when the INS raided a Santa Ana furniture manufacturer. Despite INS overtures to the business community asking its cooperation, raids that disrupt some businesses and cost them thousands of dollars in lost production go on.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1989 | Associated Press
B.P. John Furniture Co. of Santa Ana probably will not move here as planned because its owner, a subsidiary of El Paso Electric Co., is suffering cash-flow problems, officials of the utility said Thursday. B.P. John probably will continue manufacturing in Santa Ana and not move to the Las Cruces West Mesa Industrial Park, said David H. Wiggs Jr., chief executive officer of El Paso Electric. Larry Downum, vice president of the El Paso Electric Mesilla Valley division, said the move appears unlikely now "because of our current financial situation."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
More than 60% of 179 firms audited by the South Coast Air Quality Management District have under-reported the air pollution they cause, prompting the smog agency to question its own predictions of when air quality standards will be met in the nation's smoggiest urban area. The district's air pollution regulations and plans for future controls are based in large part on estimates of existing air pollution.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1988 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles area's furniture industry, which employs an estimated 63,000 people and generates annual sales of $1.3 billion, asserted Tuesday that it could be driven out of business by a stringent pollution-control rule proposed by the South Coast Air Quality Management District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1986 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
On many days, Doug arrives at his restaurant management job in Costa Mesa and finds one or more illegal aliens waiting at the back door of the kitchen for a job. Bill, the owner of a sheet metal plant in Santa Ana where 40% of the employees are undocumented, says that prospective workers line up at the factory gate on most Monday mornings in case there's an opening on his production line. The selection of these job sites is hardly random.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Gov. Pete Wilson officially launched his campaign for the presidency in Manhattan last month, he used the Statue of Liberty as a backdrop, drawing attention to his recent positions condemning illegal immigration. However, 3,000 pages of correspondence between Wilson and immigration authorities--obtained by The Times under the Freedom of Information Act--provide a somewhat different view of Wilson. In hundreds of letters from his eight years in the U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1986 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Hy Zornes hires illegal aliens to sew vinyl luggage in his Santa Ana plant. He says he has no choice. "I don't see a lot of Anglo-Saxons rushing in," Zornes said. Paul Dreiseszun pays illegal aliens an average of $4.50 per hour to assemble electronics pieces that will eventually find their way into Air Force F-16 jets. "I couldn't get the same amount of experience from anyone else for what I pay," he said. Nor can many residential builders.
NEWS
June 26, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM and RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writers
On most days, the skies above Orange County offer few clues about the chemical stew we breathe. It does not come from smokestacks spewing dark columns of industrial excess. Increasingly, it comes from producers of high-tech computer chips, circuit boards, pharmaceuticals and medical equipment, the so-called "clean" industries cherished by civic boosters, the kind of industry rich in jobs but without the mess and environmental threats of industries of old. Or so it seemed--until now. Volumes of statistics compiled for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and obtained by The Times Orange County Edition paint a startling picture of industrial air pollution in Orange County.
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