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Babble

NEWS
March 27, 1996 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The road to glamour Vanity Fair-style came after successfully passing the police barricade on Robertson Boulevard. It was here that privileged guest was separated from ordinary, inconvenienced motorist.
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SPORTS
October 20, 1990 | MELVIN DURSLAG
It took a long time for those in charge of baseball to dissuade players from scratching themselves while games were on television. And some who didn't scratch would reach down gingerly, apparently needing assurance everything was still there. It was explained to the players: "Hey, you seem to forget you are being watched by zillions of people." So, for the most part, players stopped scratching and reaching down. All they do now is chew tobacco and dispense juice about the acreage.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | Associated Press
Two groups of people reported near simultaneous encounters with an unidentified flying object and police said today they are taking the reports seriously. A family of four said their car was chased by an egg cup-shaped object along a remote stretch of outback highway, plucked from the ground and covered in ash Wednesday morning, police reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1990 | MICHAEL KINSLEY, Michael Kinsley writes the TRB column in the New Republic.
Although I have no special desire to be governor of Texas, and would actively prefer not to become head of the Office of Thrift Supervision (overseer of the savings and loan mess), the traumas of aspirants to these posts in recent days compel me to make the following statement. Like many members of my generation--Sen. Al Gore and Rep. Newt Gingrich, to name but two--I, too, experimented with marijuana in the distant past. It was in a party situation during my freshman year in college.
BOOKS
November 13, 1994 | ANNETTE SMITH, Annette Smith, a fiction prize judge, is a professor at Caltech
One day, in the middle of the last century, when white settlement was crawling, tentatively, up the coast of Queensland, three children were stopped in their games by the sight of a strange "thing" in the nearby swamps: perhaps "a human that in the manner of the tales they told one another . . . had been changed into a bird, but only halfway, and now, neither one thing nor the other, was hopping and flapping towards them out of a world . . . that was the abode of everything savage and fearsome .
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The sounds of "goo-goo" and "dada" that young children make when they begin babbling at about 7 months of age are also made by deaf infants in what scientists say is sign language, according to Canadian researchers. This "manual babbling" is not simply the random formation of signs, but instead reflects the strict linguistic rules associated with vocal babbling, the researchers report today in the journal Science.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2006 | Darragh Johnson, Washington Post
Crazy? Or cellphone? It's the latest sidewalk game in the urban canyon: On K Street, a guy in a tie screams at the air, "Who do you think you are?" In Dupont Circle, a woman downing dainty bites of a muffin ponders, seemingly to no one, "Ummm, no." Then, more confidently, "No." Outside the Capitol, a dapper young man circles a patch of sidewalk, stabs his pen at a notebook and jabbers whispered words to the ground. Crazy? Or cellphone?
MAGAZINE
August 2, 1987 | Jack Smith
We have been told recently, in numerous alarming magazine articles and surveys, that the contemporary male is reluctant to commit himself to marriage--or any lasting relationship with a woman--and consequently, women, especially if they are older than 30, have scant chance of finding a suitable mate, much less of going to the altar.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | LORI GRANGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armenian has replaced Spanish this year as the predominant foreign language in Glendale schools and the percentage of students who speak a primary language other than English rose to 63%, school district officials reported this week. An annual language census presented to Board of Education members Tuesday showed that the number of Armenian students--most of whom are recent immigrants and speak only limited English-- has more than doubled since 1988, from 2,309 to 4,859.
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