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Babe Herman

SPORTS
March 30, 1991 | JEFF RILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Royal High's Paul Taylor first stood atop the mound Friday and peered toward the batter's box, he saw more of a saucer than a plate. Taylor, a junior right-hander with only one inning of varsity work under his sleeve, breathed deeply. He hoped only to last three or four innings against Crescenta Valley in the quarterfinal-round game of the Babe Herman tournament at Stengel Field in Glendale.
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SPORTS
April 11, 1989 | Jim Murray
In 1930, something like 57 National League batters batted over .300. One of them batted .401. Last year, only four National League batters hit over .300. The league champion hit .313. In 1930, every member of the champion St. Louis Cardinals starting lineup batted over .300. Last year, most teams didn't have any batters over .300. The late Fresco Thompson used to recall ruefully the year he hit .324 for the Philadelphia Phillies--and batted eighth. In 1930, the year Bill Terry batted .401, the second-place hitter, Babe Herman, batted .393.
SPORTS
December 5, 1987
Your story on the death of Babe Herman ignored the fact he played six years with the Hollywood Stars. Babe arrived in 1939, coincidental with the opening of Gilmore Field, and became an immediate favorite of those of us of grammar school age who were just starting to follow the game. He was a genuinely friendly man who always had time for us kids. The team never finished higher than fifth or had a winning record, but each season he batted well over .300 and hit enough home runs to give us plenty of thrills.
SPORTS
December 1, 1987 | Scott Ostler
It's probably a few decades too late to set the record straight, but Babe Herman, the daffiest Dodger, wasn't daffy at all. Babe died last Friday. He was 84 years old. The newspaper obits recalled his legendary exploits. The time at Ebbets Field a fly ball bounced off Babe's head and over the fence for a ground-rule double. The time he doubled into a double play. "Daffiest of the Dodgers," one obituary headline read.
SPORTS
November 30, 1987 | United Press International
Babe Herman, a former Brooklyn Dodger who batted .324 over 11 major league seasons, died at Glendale Memorial Hospital, hospital officials said. He was 84. Herman died Friday of complications stemming from pneumonia and a long illness that started with a series of strokes in 1984, according to his brother Robert. Herman was admitted to the hospital several times over the past two years. Born June 26, 1903 in Buffalo, N.Y.
SPORTS
April 16, 1987 | STEVE ELLING, Times Staff Writer
When the players from Buena High showed up for their baseball game Wednesday night against Kennedy wearing sport coats, ties and penny loafers, the attempt at sartorial splendor drew a few chuckles from the more casually attired Kennedy players. Buena Coach Stan Hedegard's all-white, Miami Vice outfit drew the most attention. "Remember, it's better to look good than to feel good," cracked one Kennedy player, clad in a T-shirt, team cap, spikes and his uniform pants.
SPORTS
May 29, 1986 | BOB MUIR, Times Staff Writer
After a lifetime in baseball, Floyd Caves (Babe) Herman has more than his share of memories, mementos and honors. Inscribed photographs, trophies and certificates dot the walls and shelves of Herman's cozy den in his Glendale home, a shrine to one of the Dodger organization's finest hitters and most charismatic personalities. But to Herman, who hit .324 in his 13-season career, one honor ranks above the rest.
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | BOB MUIR, Times Staff Writer
After a lifetime in baseball, Floyd Caves (Babe) Herman has more than his share of memories, mementos and honors. Inscribed photographs, trophies and certificates dot the walls and shelves of Herman's cozy den in his Glendale home, a shrine to one of the Dodger organization's finest hitters and most charismatic personalities. But to Herman, who hit .324 in his 13-season career, one honor ranks above the rest.
SPORTS
March 26, 1986 | TIM BROWN, Times Staff Writer
Kennedy High won two battles Tuesday night, although one was more significant than the other. Kennedy Coach Dick Whitney underwent exploratory surgery Tuesday afternoon for possible cancer of the lymph nodes, but the results were negative. "This one was for Whit," interim Coach Scott Drootin said after Kennedy defeated Buena, 6-5, in the championship semifinals of the Babe Herman tournament. "He battled for us and we battled for him tonight," he said.
SPORTS
March 23, 1986 | TIM BROWN, Times Staff Writer
After his game with Rio Mesa High, Burbank Coach Len Haynes spent 15 minutes trying to convince his team that they really aren't as bad as it seemed Saturday afternoon. The players didn't look convinced. "You just tell them you like them," Haynes said. "You give the kids that made the errors a hug and tell them you support them." Haynes should have hugged his pitching staff.
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