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Babies Health

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1993 | SARA CATANIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking prevention to the womb, Ventura County's Health Care Agency is working to beef up prenatal services for low-income women. A smoking-cessation program launched this week is seeking out expectant mothers to help them kick the habit. And the Women, Infants and Children program is expanding to provide food and nutrition education to more needy people.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
July 9, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Fido the dog and Ginger the cat need not worry about being replaced by a new baby - in fact, they could be helping parents raise healthier children. A new study finds that children who lived with dogs or cats during their first year of life got sick less frequently than kids from pet-free zones. The study, published in Monday's edition of the journal Pediatrics, provides fresh evidence for the counterintuitive notion that an overly clean environment may not be ideal for babies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of babies reported as being born addicted to drugs in Los Angeles County dropped by 10% during 1990, the first decrease since such statistics have been kept, according to a study to be released today. Experts called the finding encouraging, but also cautioned that the statistics may reflect, at least in part, a decline in reporting. As one county doctor said, "The battle is not won."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
About 40% of births in Los Angeles County each year are the result of unplanned pregnancies, which can endanger the health of babies, according to a study released by the county's Department of Public Health. The figure is based primarily on a county survey completed in 2006 of more than 5,200 women ages 13 to 56 who had recently given birth. The percentage of unplanned pregnancies was about the same among women who gave birth and those who experienced stillbirths and miscarriages, according to Dr. Susie Baldwin, chief of the department's health assessment unit, which produced the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1995 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cardiac care nurse Mary Krugler has seen plenty of patients loaded onto gurneys, heading into surgery. But Tuesday, doctors wheeled tiny, 3-week-old baby Matthew into the operating room for a heart transplant and there was one big difference: This was Krugler's only son. Len and Mary Krugler, who conceived after Mary had spent 12 years trying to get pregnant, spent the early morning hours Tuesday at the side of their baby, who was born with a fatal heart ailment.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Naaman Poingsett turns 8 today. He is a talkative second-grader with Disneyland on his mind. He bowls, has a B average in school and knows every aircraft at Los Angeles International Airport. His health is good. But his parents remain on guard. After all, they waited 13 years for Naaman. His mother, Katie, had four miscarriages before he was conceived. Then he arrived 12 weeks early, weighing 2 pounds, 11 ounces, and spent four months in a Los Angeles hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The parents of a Northridge infant who died from an undiagnosed birth defect have filed a lawsuit against the County of Los Angeles and a nursing service for allegedly withholding medical records that showed the baby was sick when it left the hospital.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | BARRY BEARAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between 1965 and 1971, five healthy babies were born here to a poor woman who seemed to want them desperately and who mourned each of their deaths with a convulsive grief that quavered the soul. At one funeral, Waneta Hoyt fainted after the lowering of the tiny, pitiful coffin and at another, her body collapsed with the great force of her sobbing. She had to be helped away from the freshly turned soil at the graveside.
NEWS
July 26, 1998 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monday, Jan. 12, unfolded for Dr. Eugene Turner as did most of his days. Between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., he saw a stream of patients at the Peninsula Children's Clinic here on the northern edge of Olympic National Park. All left feeling safe and cared for. So did their parents. Turner, a pediatrician who'd practiced in Port Angeles for 27 years, had that effect. With his tear-shaped eyes and white thinning hair and craggy features, the 62-year-old doctor conveyed boundless concern.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | DICK WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emillee Young, born four months ago and way too soon, was back in a hospital incubator recently, resting after eye surgery. Her right eye covered by a patch, her fingernails tinier than bits of confetti, her left leg twitching as if from a dream, she slept. To those who have come to know this baby, she is a miracle. Weighing little more than a pound at birth, Emillee spent her first 108 days at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Bellflower before her mother took her home for a week.
OPINION
February 17, 2009 | Allen Goldberg, Allen Goldberg is a marketing executive who lives in Washington. His blog about his son, Henry, can be found at www.dearhenry.org
Something stinks about reproductive medicine in Southern California, and it doesn't involve eight dirty diapers. Recently, the Los Angeles-based Fertility Institutes announced that it would soon be offering patients at its clinics the chance to choose traits such as "eye color, hair color and complexion." The clinics already offer gender selection to patients undergoing in vitro fertilization.
HEALTH
December 23, 2002 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Back in the 1990s, a public outcry over "drive-through deliveries" led 41 states and the federal government to pass laws mandating 48-hour minimum hospital stays for mothers after routine births. Proponents of the laws argued that sending mothers home from the hospital less than 24 hours after birth, as some health plans were doing, posed a health risk to infants. Now a Harvard study has found no evidence that sending mothers home faster harmed the health of newborns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2002 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With seven new cases of HIV reported among children in January, Los Angeles County health officials issued a public alert Monday urging pregnant women to be tested and treated to forestall these largely preventable infections. By taking anti-AIDS drugs during pregnancy and avoiding breastfeeding after birth, HIV-positive women can cut the chances of passing the virus to newborns to less than 8%, said Dr. Toni Frederick, chief epidemiologist with the county's pediatric HIV project.
NEWS
September 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
After nearly two months in the newborn intensive care unit, most of the septuplets born to a Saudi Arabian couple are gaining strength and weight, and some could leave the hospital this month, Georgetown University Hospital officials said Friday. Three of the seven have been upgraded to fair condition and moved to the unit's "step-down" ward, where the babies do not need as much monitoring.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | STEPHANI SUTHERLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a three-year campaign to eradicate congenital syphilis, the rate of babies born with the disease has dropped by half, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. A mothers with syphilis will pass the infection to her fetus. The disease is otherwise spread by sexual contact. If not treated, up to 40% of infants with syphilis die, while others will face developmental problems and seizures. Found early enough, however, syphilis is easily treated.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A prominent health care organization warned U.S. hospitals Wednesday to watch out for the return of a rare but preventable type of brain damage in newborns that has been on the rise with shorter hospital stays and increased breast-feeding. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, a health care accrediting group, issued an alert to 5,000 U.S. hospitals about kernicterus, a highly unusual condition that stems from severe jaundice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1990 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cheryl Milford, a psychologist at UCI Medical Center, insists that she did not want to be known "as the lady who works with drug babies." Neither did pediatrician Lynn Hunt, whose main job at the university hospital is running the normal newborn nursery. But slightly more than a year ago, both women found themselves drawn to the plight of some of the medical center's babies. Some were born prematurely--their mothers' labor triggered months early when they took methamphetamines or cocaine.
NEWS
November 2, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At an age when toddlers normally walk, talk and play with toys, 19-month-old Ignacio Bermudez rocks in an infant swing. Sturdy and round-faced, he is a handsome, healthy-looking boy. But his only sounds are a baby's coos, and his tightly clenched fists reach out for nothing. Eighteen months ago, Ignacio, called Nachito by his family, became front-page news as the tiny victim of a vicious beating by a most unlikely attacker--a 6-year-old neighbor boy.
SPORTS
December 20, 2000 | JIM HODGES
The last couple of games have been difficult for defenseman Mathieu Schneider. Actually, the last few days have been hard. "I've had a lot on my mind," he admitted Tuesday. At the top of the list has been Mathieu Schneider Jr., in an incubator at Cedars Sinai, where he was born Thursday, a few hours after his father was minus-three in a game he was excited about playing against the New York Rangers, his former employers.
NEWS
September 11, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a dilemma for a modern-day Solomon that pits religious parents against the state, and a healthy twin against the conjoined sister who depends on her for survival. Should the month-old twins be separated in an operation that will end the life of the weak sister but save her stronger sibling?
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