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NEWS
September 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
A doctor who acknowledged using his hands to block an infant's breathing after the boy was declared brain dead was charged with second-degree murder Monday. Dr. Eugene Turner was summoned to appear at a Sept. 25 court hearing in the Jan. 12 death of 3-day-old Conor McInnerney, who was rushed to Olympic Memorial Hospital after he stopped breathing.
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HEALTH
August 24, 1998 | THOMAS H MAUGH II
Women who smoke during pregnancy transmit a known cancer-causing substance from tobacco to their children, producing what University of Minnesota scientists deemed "an unacceptable risk." About 61% of smoking women who become pregnant do not give up the habit during their pregnancy, according to a 1990 study. Chemist Stephen S. Hecht and his colleagues examined first urine samples from 48 newborns, both from smoking and nonsmoking mothers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1998 | REGINA HONG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Closing an investigation that began in July, state officials have determined that Ventura County Medical Center properly cared for a 1-year-old Oxnard girl who suffered from a flesh-eating bacteria. "The investigation was limited to the complaint and the complaint was whether the county handled the case appropriately," said Lea Brooks, spokeswoman for the state Department of Health Services. The complaint was filed after questions were raised by the child's grandmother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1998 | MARGARET RAMIREZ and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nearly a month after so-called flesh-eating bacteria ravaged the right side of her tiny body, baby Rosa celebrated her first birthday Friday with squeals of delight. The party at Northridge Hospital Medical Center had the usual balloons, cake, punch and plenty of presents from the doctors and nurses who treated the Oxnard infant as she battled the deadly bacteria. But the greatest gift could not be wrapped. The baby's freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1998 | MARGARET RAMIREZ and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Just over a month after flesh-eating bacteria ravaged the right side of her tiny body, Baby Rosa celebrated her first birthday Friday with squeals of delight. The party at Northridge Hospital Medical Center had the usual balloons, cake, punch and plenty of presents from the doctors and nurses who treated the Oxnard infant as she battled the deadly bacteria. But the greatest gift could not be wrapped. Baby Rosa's freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1998 | PHIL WILLON
Baby Rosa, the Oxnard infant stricken with flesh-eating bacteria, will be released from the hospital today--her first birthday. Rosa Olvera arrived at Northridge Hospital Medical Center in critical condition in early July, after surgeons in Ventura County removed muscle tissue and nearly 20% of her skin infected by the bacteria. At Northridge, Rosa underwent two skin grafts.
NEWS
July 26, 1998 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monday, Jan. 12, unfolded for Dr. Eugene Turner as did most of his days. Between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., he saw a stream of patients at the Peninsula Children's Clinic here on the northern edge of Olympic National Park. All left feeling safe and cared for. So did their parents. Turner, a pediatrician who'd practiced in Port Angeles for 27 years, had that effect. With his tear-shaped eyes and white thinning hair and craggy features, the 62-year-old doctor conveyed boundless concern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1998 | PHIL WILLON
The outlook is improving for the 11-month-old Oxnard girl stricken with flesh-eating bacteria, hospital officials said Wednesday. Rosa Icela Olvera was healthy enough to be taken off a ventilator, and the temporary skin grafts covering her extensive wounds were 90% successful, said Dr. Hooshang Semnani, head of pediatric critical care at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, where Rosa has been receiving treatment since July 3.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
World health authorities are poised to embark on a treatment program that they say could reduce the number of children with AIDS in developing countries and save as many as 5,000 children's lives in the first year alone, researchers said Monday at the 12th World AIDS Congress. Of the 16,000 people who contract AIDS every day, 1 in 10 are infants who are infected during childbirth.
HEALTH
June 1, 1998
Nursing moms, take note: Whatever medicines you're taking get passed along to your child. Here are some points to consider. Most medications taken in normal doses are safe for the breast-feeding mother. But even safe drugs will be passed along in your breast milk and affect your baby to some degree. For example: * Antibiotics can cause diarrhea. * Antihistamines can lead to irritability. * Prescription pain drugs and sedatives can cause drowsiness.
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