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Babies Health

NEWS
April 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
An HIV-infected mother who lost custody of her baby after she insisted on breast-feeding went to court in Eugene, Ore., seeking to get him back, arguing that her milk can't spread the deadly virus. Kathleen Tyson and her husband, David, don't believe HIV causes AIDS, and their refusal to give up breast-feeding led authorities to take legal custody of their 4-month-old son, Felix, when he was just days old.
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NEWS
April 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Wisconsin's Supreme Court split over whether women can be charged with criminal offenses for alcohol abuse that harms an unborn child. The tie sends the case back to the state court of appeals, which had passed it along to the high court without ruling. Deborah Zimmerman was charged with attempted first-degree intentional homicide and first-degree reckless injury after her daughter was born with a 0.199% blood-alcohol level. She challenged a judge's refusal to drop the charges.
NEWS
April 8, 1999 | HEIDI SHERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to decrease the number of deaths linked to sudden infant death syndrome, consumer and health groups are asking parents to dress their babies in warm nightclothes instead of wrapping them in quilts, sheepskins and blankets. The groups plan to release their recommendations at a news conference today, The Times has learned.
NEWS
March 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Male children born to women who smoke during pregnancy run a risk of violent and criminal behavior that lasts well into adulthood, perhaps because of central nervous system damage, a study said. The finding was consistent with earlier studies that linked prenatal smoking not only to lawbreaking by the offspring but to impulsive behavior and attention deficit problems, said researchers at Emory University in Atlanta, USC and the Institute of Preventive Medicine in Denmark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Researchers trying to reduce the cost of preventing AIDS among the world's poor have found that giving mothers standard medicines for just a week cut the risk that they will pass on the virus during childbirth by more than one-third. Doctors have known for about five years that the drug AZT during pregnancy blocks HIV-infected mothers from giving the virus to their babies.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Someone who violently shakes a baby can be punished for felony child abuse even if he or she is unaware that the shaking can harm the child, the California Supreme Court decided Monday. The unanimous ruling was the state court's first decision on shaken baby syndrome, an injury made famous when English au pair Louise Woodward was convicted of killing a child in her care by shaking him. Shaken baby syndrome causes about 300 deaths nationally each year and hundreds of permanent injuries. Atty.
HEALTH
January 18, 1999 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At time of life when most of us were alone with the thump-thump-thump of our mother's heartbeat, eight babies in Houston were wriggling in a close-packed jumble of legs and arms and heads and elbows and tushes. At a time when most of us still had months of lazy lolling ahead in the wet, warm and dark of our mother's womb, eight babies were entering a strange, bright, dry, noisy world.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mother of the Houston octuplets--still physically weak but vigorous in her faith--left the hospital Wednesday, saying that her desire to have the babies had far overshadowed her painful pregnancy. Flanked by her husband and mother, 27-year-old Nkem Chukwu smiled confidently from a wheelchair and told a roomful of reporters at St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital: "I was so thankful to God because that was what I wished for . . . . I wanted to have as many [children] as God wants to give me."
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone has something to say about the babies. The eight babies born this month in Houston, where most of us don't live, to Nkem Chukwu and Iyke Louis Udobi, whom most of us don't know. Fifty years ago, before television turned the world into a small town, we wouldn't have even heard of these births, or at least not moments after it occurred, as if we were all anxious relatives, deserving of an intimate, blow-by-blow account not only of the births, but of themechanics of conception.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
A week after she was born weighing just 10.3 ounces, the smallest of the octuplets delivered to a Texas couple died Sunday of heart and lung failure. Chijindu Chidera, nicknamed Odera, was pronounced dead shortly before 3:30 a.m. at Texas Children's Hospital here after medication and chest compressions failed to save her. "We are very saddened by the passing of our beloved baby Odera," the parents, Nkem Chukwu and Iyke Louis Udobi, said in a statement.
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