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NEWS
January 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The world's second baboon-to-human liver transplant recipient has failed to fully awaken four days after his surgery, possibly because his liver was not functioning as well as anticipated, doctors said Thursday. As a result, doctors Thursday performed a liver biopsy on the patient, a 62-year-old man who has not been identified, said a University of Pittsburgh Medical Center spokeswoman.
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NEWS
January 12, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A 62-year-old Pittsburgh man who received a baboon liver in a Sunday evening operation was groggy but in good condition Monday, his surgeons said. The unidentified man, who before the 13-hour operation had only an estimated 30 days to live because of a fatal liver disease, is the second human to receive a baboon liver. He could not be given a human liver because of an active hepatitis B infection, which would infect and destroy a transplanted human liver.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | From Reuters
University of Pittsburgh doctors began the world's second transplant of a baboon liver into a human being Sunday night, hospital employees said. The first such transplant was performed at the university last June 28. The recipient, an unidentified 35-year-old man, survived until Sept. 6, when he died of a stroke. Members of the hospital's public relations staff declined to confirm or deny the operation was under way.
NEWS
January 11, 1993
Doctors at the University of Pittsburgh performed their second baboon-to-human liver transplant Sunday, saying they had been encouraged by the moderate success of the first operation last June. The patient, a 62-year-old man, was dying of hepatitis B, a virus that destroys the liver. Baboon livers are believed to be immune to the disease. The transplant took nearly 12 hours, Dr. John Fung, the lead surgeon, said by phone during a break. "The liver is in," Fung said.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | JAMIE TALAN, NEWSDAY
Stanford University biologist Robert Sapolsky travels thousands of miles each summer to try to better understand stress. He has spent more than 15 summers in the forests in the East African Serengeti, where he carefully monitors a troop of olive baboons he hopes will help unlock the secret of stress. With the crudest of tools, he painstakingly watches and records the baboons' daily lives, identifying leaders and followers and collecting blood samples to be tested for hormonal changes.
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | Associated Press
A man who received a baboon's liver in the first such animal-to-human transplant died late Sunday after suffering a stroke and lapsing into a coma, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center reported. Dr. Howard R. Doyle of the Pitt transplant team said doctors were trying to wean the 35-year-old man from a respirator Sunday afternoon when they discovered the man's brain was bleeding. The man suffered a stroke, and nearly seven hours later he was pronounced dead of intracranial bleeding.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | Associated Press
Doctors are not certain why a baboon's liver that was transplanted into a man in June has deteriorated, a University of Pittsburgh Medical Center spokeswoman says. The 35-year-old patient was listed in critical but stable condition with sepsis, a blood infection, and impaired liver function. Antibiotics have reduced his fever and stabilized his blood pressure. The man, whose name has been withheld at his request, underwent the first animal-to-human liver transplant in an 11-hour operation.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | Reuters
The 35-year-old recipient in the world's first baboon-to-human liver transplant developed a fever this week that sent him to intensive care two months after the operation, a hospital official said. A spokeswoman for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's Presbyterian University Hospital said that the patient, who has requested anonymity, was listed in fair condition and that his temperature was back to normal by midday Thursday.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | Associated Press
A man given a baboon's liver last month in a historic transplant operation had some mild rejection symptoms but is doing well, officials say. Doctors used steroids during the weekend to reverse the rejection, said Lisa Rossi, spokeswoman for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "He is alert and in good spirits," she said Tuesday. The 35-year-old man, whose liver was attacked by hepatitis B, asked hospital officials to withhold his identity. He received the new liver on June 28.
NEWS
July 18, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The recipient in the first baboon-to-human liver transplant was doing so well that doctors cut his doses of anti-rejection drugs to levels closer to those used in human-to-human transplants, hospital officials said. Nineteen days after the transplantation, the 35-year-old patient, who has requested anonymity, was still listed in serious condition, a spokeswoman for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's Presbyterian University Hospital said.
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