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BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Pacific Telesis Group, citing costly regulatory adjustments, Thursday reported third-quarter earnings of $278 million. That was off 9.3% from the same period a year earlier, when it posted a record profit for the three-month period ending Sept. 30. Overall, results were mixed for the six so-called Baby Bell firms that reported quarterly results. Pacific Telesis, parent of Pacific Bell and Nevada Bell, was one of four Baby Bells that posted earnings declines, while two others registered gains.
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BUSINESS
November 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Supreme Court justices pressed both sides Monday in the oral arguments of a case that businesses of all stripes care deeply about: How hard should it be to get evidence that a company might be violating antitrust laws? The case, Bell Atlantic vs. Twombly, stems from the deregulation of the telecommunications industry in the 1980s and 1990s, with some experts citing it as the most important antitrust case to reach the Supreme Court in 20 years.
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OPINION
November 13, 2003
Oh to be a fly on the wall last month when executives at regional telephone companies, three of them Baby Bells, invited telecommunications and high-tech executives to an exclusive dinner at the St. Regis hotel in Washington, D.C. Before the tech and telecom guests could even get to the appetizer, the folks from Verizon, BellSouth and SBC were prodding them to help fund a $40-million lobbying campaign to push federal regulators out of the local phone business.
OPINION
February 1, 2005
Someone's buying AT&T -- and it isn't even the biggest deal of the month. Let's hope Alexander Graham Bell isn't informed in the afterlife that SBC is getting AT&T for less than a third of the $57 billion that Procter & Gamble is shelling out for a maker of razors. How humiliating. Not that long ago, the idea of someone buying AT&T would have been as ridiculous as someone buying the United States.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1991 | PAUL SAFFO, PAUL SAFFO is a research fellow at the Institute for the Future in Menlo Park.
What is the difference between a PC and a telephone? These days plenty, but the Bell Operating Cos. want to turn both into ubiquitous information tools. Last week, the Baby Bells took a big step closer to this goal when U.S. District Judge Harold Greene granted them permission to enter the information services business.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1993 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times. He can be reached by electronic mail at schrage@latimes.com on the Internet
If you listened very carefully when U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III freed the Baby Bells to offer video services over their own phone lines, you could just make out Ethel Merman singing, "There's No Business Like Show Business." The only folks more thrilled with the ruling than the seven Baby Bells are the peddlers and packagers at CAA, ICM and the William Morris Agency--and so they should be.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
In a victory for government regulators, an appeals court Tuesday upheld a law forcing the nation's biggest local phone companies to meet special requirements before they can offer long-distance service to their customers. The ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia is significant because it means the nation's five regional Bell telephone companies will continue to face tough standards as they try to get into the $90-billion long-distance market.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | ROGER SIMON
Generally speaking, I think it's best to avoid nostalgia. It just makes you sad. A few days ago I was talking to a friend of mine about our childhoods, and somehow the conversation got around to what happened back then when the telephone broke. "You went next door and dialed--what was it? 211?" he said. And the next day the phone truck would come down the street, I said. "And the guy driving it would be wearing a yellow hard hat with a drawing of a bell on it," my friend said.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1997 | Reuters
GTE Corp. filed an antitrust suit against five regional Bell telephone companies and two leading Internet companies for allegedly squeezing GTE and other rivals out of the Internet Yellow Pages market. GTE, a Stamford, Conn.-based telecommunications group, asked the federal court in Washington, D.C., to bar the Baby Bells from continuing to offer their joint Internet Yellow Pages product. The suit also asked the court to order Internet access providers Netscape Communications Corp.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Verizon Communications Inc.'s Bell Atlantic unit and other Baby Bell local telephone companies may be subject to federal antitrust suits by consumers complaining of inferior service, a U.S. appeals court ruled. The decision by the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals opens the Baby Bells to lawsuits by retail customers who may collect triple damages if they succeed. Until now, only competitors were allowed to bring antitrust claims over poor service against companies such as Verizon, the biggest U.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2005 | James S. Granelli and Jon Healey, Times Staff Writers
Since its founding by Alexander Graham Bell, AT&T Corp. has been synonymous with the telephone. But the venerable corporate giant once known as "Ma Bell" may soon be eaten by one of its young. SBC Communications Inc., one of the so-called Baby Bells spawned from AT&T's 1984 breakup, is in talks to buy its former parent, according to people familiar with the negotiations. A deal could be announced as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2004 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators on Wednesday called a halt to the discounted lease rates that encouraged competition in local telephone markets and helped customers save as much as $10 billion a year. The Federal Communications Commission voted 3 to 2 to stop regulating wholesale rates in the residential market by early 2006. The action, cheered somewhat by the nation's four regional local phone giants, was widely criticized.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2004 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators Thursday granted big telephone companies more control over the expensive high-speed fiber-optic networks they are building for residential areas, prompting SBC Communications Inc. to accelerate its plans to reach 18 million households. The Federal Communications Commission also set standards for offering broadband service to consumers over power lines and cleared some spectrum for advanced wireless services like video-conferencing and movies.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2004 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Having won major victories this year to limit competition for home telephone service, the regional companies that own the nation's local phone networks want to fine-tune the regulations -- which could make it tougher for rivals serving businesses. The companies, including California's leading local carriers, SBC Communications Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc., say that all they are doing is seeking clarifications of decisions made by the Federal Communications Commission.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2004 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Three weeks after winning unusually swift approval of stopgap telephone competition rules, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Michael K. Powell is under pressure to change key elements in an effort to help the companies that compete with the Baby Bells. The temporary rules -- which haven't yet gone into effect -- would govern the extent to which the Bells must share their equipment with rivals.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2004 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
AT&T Corp. on Friday called for binding arbitration to settle disputes over its use of local telephone networks owned by the regional Baby Bells. The nation's largest long-distance carrier and other telecommunications companies lease the Bells' networks at regulated rates as part of a 1996 federal law intended to promote competition in local phone service. It's an arrangement that saves customers $10 billion a year.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1998 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court on Friday upheld the government's restrictions on how regional Bell telephone companies provide sports scores, stock quotes and other electronic publishing services. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, in a 2-1 decision, rejected arguments made by BellSouth Corp. that the restrictions are unconstitutional.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1997 | Associated Press
All five Baby Bells asked a court to stop the government from requiring them to open their networks at certain prices as a prerequisite for entering the long-distance market. The lawsuit, filed in Washington, is the second in as many days against the Federal Communications Commission on the issue. On Wednesday, state regulators filed suit in a federal appeals court in St. Louis.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2004 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
With a Friday strike deadline looming, SBC Communications Inc. and the union for 100,000 of the telephone company's workers -- including 30,000 in California -- resume formal contract talks today still far apart on nagging issues of healthcare benefits and job security. Negotiators for SBC and the Communications Workers of America are scheduled to meet with a federal mediator in Washington after a week's break. The two sides earlier reached a key agreement on healthcare benefits for retirees.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2004 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
It's all about the money. The companies that own the nation's local telephone networks want more for leasing their lines and equipment. Their rivals figure they can't pay higher rates and stay profitable. Nobody wants to send customers bigger monthly bills. As lawmakers, regulators and telephone company executives struggle to provide the choices and lower prices envisioned by the Telecommunications Act of 1996, it's becoming clear to all of them that something has to give.
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