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Baby Bottles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
Just a mention of the word throws off James Oh, as if you've come looking for someone who moved out long ago. "Riots here?" he says, pointing to his store, Tom's Liquor. "No, no. Riots long, long time ago. " Today, the shelves are neatly stocked, the floors are sparkling clean and marigold daisies blossom in the sun a few feet from his door. On the walls outside: "No graffiti at all," he says proudly. Twenty years ago today, when Oh was in Germany clearing minefields for the Army, one of the nation's worst riots exploded in Los Angeles.
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NEWS
February 8, 1991 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C ynthia Blum was newly pregnant when she and her doctor husband decided to find out if their household was safe from lead exposure. They sent away for a home lead testing kit. When it arrived, they unpacked a set of Italian pottery. And, "just out of curiosity," Blum pulled out a crystal decanter they had received as a wedding gift. They tested the tableware at their Tenafly, N.J., home: The pottery was negative; the decanter was positive. Lead apparently was leaking from the crystal.
NEWS
June 6, 1991
The women arrived carrying baby bottles, clothing, bibs and cuddly toys--typical gifts for a baby shower. But, with no expectant mother in sight, this was no ordinary shower. The recent party at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Long Beach was the first annual baby shower for low-income women sponsored by the local chapter of the National Organization for Women.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2008 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
A controversial, estrogen-like chemical in plastic could be harming the development of children's brains and reproductive organs, a federal health agency concluded in a report released Tuesday. The National Toxicology Program, part of the National Institutes of Health, concluded that there was "some concern" that fetuses, babies and children were in danger because bisphenol A, or BPA, harmed animals at low levels found in nearly all human bodies.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
A nun convicted of smearing her blood on a Colorado nuclear missile silo in an antiwar protest was released from federal prison Thursday after about two years behind bars. Ardeth Platte, 69, and two other Dominican sisters were arrested in 2002 after they cut a chain-link fence surrounding a Minuteman III silo and used baby bottles to dispense their blood in the shape of a cross. Air Force security left training exercises to respond, arriving at the site in armored vehicles.
HEALTH
May 19, 2008 | Karen Ravn, Special to The Times
The synthetic chemical bisphenol A has long been found in many household products, but it's just starting to become a household name. Not to mention a hot topic in the scientific community. "Papers about it are being published at the rate of about one a day," says John Bucher, associate director for the National Toxicology Program, an agency of the National Institutes of Health.
SCIENCE
February 13, 2013 | By Kenneth R. Weiss
Less than half of the 280 million metric tons of plastic produced each year ends up in the landfill.  A fair bit of the rest ends up littering the landscape, blown by the wind or washed down streams and rivers into the sea. So far Americans spend $520 million a year to clean up plastic litter washing up on West Coast beaches and shorelines. Efforts to clean up the oceans' enormous swirling gyres of garbage has an incalculable cost. Thus, much of the focus has been on how to stop the river of trash from entering the ocean.
HOME & GARDEN
December 6, 2008
Just how crazy are some pet lovers? It's a question that needs no words to answer -- not when you have a photo of an otherwise dignified feline posed in a pink wig. Go to www.kittywigs.com, and the first question in the FAQ says it all: "Is this for real?" The answer, of course, is yes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1995 | MAKI BECKER
Amid widespread speculation that he is about to announce his candidacy for the White House, Gov. Pete Wilson on Friday took part in an odd twist on the traditional political ritual of kissing babies. To demonstrate the safety of products for infants made by Munchkin Inc. of Van Nuys, Wilson struggled to yank the nipple off a cap to a baby bottle before a crowd of reporters.
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