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NEWS
February 21, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 50-year-old Lompoc grandmother who received fertility treatments at a Northridge reproductive center delivered healthy quadruplets Thursday, apparently the oldest woman to have four children at once, hospital administrators said. "We wanted a child to make our marriage complete," said beaming dad Robert Fillippini, a 49-year-old welder. "To be blessed with four is just a miracle."
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BUSINESS
June 26, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gerber Products Co., the dominant maker of baby foods in America, will stop adding starch and sugar to most of its main products in an effort to grab a bigger chunk of the health-conscious-parents market. Gerber said the move, to be formally announced today, is unrelated to criticisms by a consumer advocacy group that the company diluted its baby foods with water, sugar and chemically modified starch and deceived the public about the foods' nutritional value.
NEWS
May 14, 1996 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
There was joy and relief in the jampacked delivery room at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. Patty Shier of Westchester had just given birth to five good-sized, wailing, pink babies, probably the healthiest quintuplets ever born in the United States. A few miles away in a Torrance medical office, seven months of worry began to fade from the face of Dr. Rifaat Salem, who had used in vitro fertilization to help Shier become pregnant.
NEWS
January 17, 1996
Playing with toys in the tub, singing songs and playing with bubbles ranked as the three top activities at bath time for parents with infants, according to a national survey of 1,700 parents. Here are some of the other responses that come out of the survey by Drypers Corp.: * 43.8% of parents read to their children at bedtime; * 31% rock their children to sleep; * 16.7% sing their children to sleep; * 28.7% make their own baby food.
FOOD
December 7, 1995 | LEILA COBO-HANLON
Usually we encounter Michael Jacobson, executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, under the glare of TV camera lights, blasting yet another food that Americans have come to love--maybe movie house popcorn or deli sandwiches or Mexican food--for being too fatty. On this weekday, Jacobson is home, taking care of his 3-year-old daughter, Sonya, and talking to a reporter on the telephone. He is, as always, ready to voice a strong opinion and unafraid to name names.
FOOD
August 10, 1995 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of America's most controversial encounters with a pesticide happened more than six years ago when an environmental group's report charged that Alar, a chemical used primarily on apples, was a carcinogen and should be banned. Images of kids eating poisoned fruit gripped the nation's psyche. The claim received unprecedented media coverage and led to dramatic sales declines for all apples, whether or not treated with Alar.
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