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NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Eighty percent of polyurethane foam samples from 101 common baby products had detectable amounts of "potentially toxic" flame retardants, a team of scientists reported this week in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. For the Record, 3:33 p.m. July 14: An earlier version of this post included a photo that showed, among other items for children, dolls and blankets manufactured by Blabla Kids. The Los Angeles Times has no knowledge of these products being among the ones tested for flame retardants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown wants to free manufacturers of furniture and baby products from having to treat those items with flame retardants that environmentalists say are ineffective and create health risks. His administration proposed new rules Friday, months after Brown and health groups cited studies by the California Environmental Protection Agency and others indicating that California toddlers and nursing mothers had higher levels of flame-retardant chemicals in their bodies than did those not exposed to treated products.
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BUSINESS
March 9, 2000 |
Gerber Products Co. said it is launching a line of powders, oils and other toiletries for infants and toddlers, a move that pits the king of baby food against baby-care products giant Johnson & Johnson. In all, Summit, N.J.-based Gerber has developed 14 new baby products, including shampoos, diaper rash ointment and vitamin drops. They include an apple-banana-flavored tooth and gum cleaner and a lavender-scented baby wash.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2012 | By Shan Li
Model and reality television host Heidi Klum is adding another notch to her resume -- this time designing baby wear and accessories for the Babies R Us chain. The collection, dubbed "Truly Scrumptious by Heidi Klum," will include a "trend-right" assortment of furniture, decor, apparel and other "affordable luxuries for little ones" that will be in stores and online this fall, the company said in a statement. Klum, a mother of four, joins a roster of other celebrity moms and high-wattage designers who have parlayed their star power into the kids' market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2006 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
A controversial Assembly bill that would have banned two toxic compounds in plastic baby products died Thursday after supporters could not round up enough support from members of the Appropriations Committee.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2001 | The Washington Post
Cosco Inc., one of the nation's largest makers of baby products, has agreed to pay $1.3 million to settle charges that it failed to promptly report to the Consumer Product Safety Commission serious product defects that led to hundreds of injuries and two deaths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1997
New parents, grandparents and parents-to-be can learn about caring for tots Saturday at the Conejo Park and Recreation District's fourth annual Baby Expo. Information on pre- and postnatal care and samples of new baby products will be available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Borchard Community Center, 190 Reino Road, in Newbury Park. There will be more than 110 booths promoting products such as highchairs and baby blankets, said Robin Stidham, event organizer.
OPINION
July 13, 2009 | Russell Long, Russell Long is vice president of Friends of the Earth.
For decades, California has been the only state in the nation to require the use of highly toxic fire-retardant chemicals on cribs, infant carriers, strollers, nursing pillows, changing tables, high chairs and other baby products. Regulations mandating the treatment were well intentioned. Who wouldn't want to protect children from fire?
BUSINESS
February 28, 1995 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Right Start Inc. took a wrong turn a couple of years ago. The baby products mail-order company bought another catalogue, Children's Wear Digest, in hopes of capturing apparel sales for older kids when they outgrew the namesake The Right Start Catalog, which sells products aimed only at infants and toddlers. Like an earlier stab at expanding its mail-order customer base, this one didn't work either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown wants to free manufacturers of furniture and baby products from having to treat those items with flame retardants that environmentalists say are ineffective and create health risks. His administration proposed new rules Friday, months after Brown and health groups cited studies by the California Environmental Protection Agency and others indicating that California toddlers and nursing mothers had higher levels of flame-retardant chemicals in their bodies than did those not exposed to treated products.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Here's your wind-beneath-my-wings Wednesday roundup of consumer news from around the Web: --You know Jessica Alba the movie star. But what about Jessica Alba the Internet entrepreneur? After giving birth to a new baby, Alba has launched an e-commerce company at Honest.com (named after her 3-year-old daughter Honor) to sell eco-friendly and toxic-free baby products and household items for a monthly subscription. She says the idea was born after she learned that toxic chemicals are in widely used, everyday products.
NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Eighty percent of polyurethane foam samples from 101 common baby products had detectable amounts of "potentially toxic" flame retardants, a team of scientists reported this week in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. For the Record, 3:33 p.m. July 14: An earlier version of this post included a photo that showed, among other items for children, dolls and blankets manufactured by Blabla Kids. The Los Angeles Times has no knowledge of these products being among the ones tested for flame retardants.
HOME & GARDEN
April 9, 2011 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Bugaboo, the brand that introduced the $800 stroller to America, has put a new model on the market that can retail for as much as $1,659. It is called the Donkey and no, it doesn't walk your baby by itself, or work by remote control, or carry enough water to last three days in the desert. It doesn't even claim to be safer than other strollers. What it does do is convert from a very fancy single stroller into a side-by-side double and back again. And despite the price, people are lining up to buy it. "It's expensive, but the price point was what we expected to pay for the quality and the durability," said Billy Kobayashi, a father of one with another on the way, while picking up his family's Donkey at the Bugaboo store in El Segundo.
HOME & GARDEN
January 30, 2010 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
When Christine DeHaven's son was 2 months old, she wrote a list of what she considered essential baby products to pass along to her pregnant friends. "As a new mom, there is so much out there, and they make you feel like you need all these things," she wrote in her note. "I wanted to tell people what I really used. " There are 36 items on the list, which she has since e-mailed to half a dozen expecting moms. It includes burp cloths ("I go through so many a day it is crazy," she wrote)
OPINION
July 13, 2009 | Russell Long, Russell Long is vice president of Friends of the Earth.
For decades, California has been the only state in the nation to require the use of highly toxic fire-retardant chemicals on cribs, infant carriers, strollers, nursing pillows, changing tables, high chairs and other baby products. Regulations mandating the treatment were well intentioned. Who wouldn't want to protect children from fire?
BUSINESS
April 4, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Warning of potential injury and death, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has announced a flurry of recalls of baby-related merchandise, including high chairs with falling seats, cribs that can cause suffocation and toys that pose a choking hazard. About 643,000 Evenflo Envision high chairs and 90,000 Evenflo Majestic high chairs were recalled Thursday because plastic fasteners and metal screws can fall out and allow the seat back to fall backward or detach, said Scott Wolfson, a commission spokesman.
HOME & GARDEN
January 30, 2010 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
When Christine DeHaven's son was 2 months old, she wrote a list of what she considered essential baby products to pass along to her pregnant friends. "As a new mom, there is so much out there, and they make you feel like you need all these things," she wrote in her note. "I wanted to tell people what I really used. " There are 36 items on the list, which she has since e-mailed to half a dozen expecting moms. It includes burp cloths ("I go through so many a day it is crazy," she wrote)
BUSINESS
February 5, 2006 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
Holly Baxter was a stay-at-home mom looking for ways to make ends meet when she met Laine Caspi at a parents group. Caspi had recently started marketing a baby carrier that she'd designed, and she offered Baxter a deal: Think of a baby product worth selling, and Caspi would get it to market and give her a percentage of the proceeds. Baxter came up with Teeny Towels -- all-natural antibacterial wipes small enough to hook onto a keychain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2006 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
A controversial Assembly bill that would have banned two toxic compounds in plastic baby products died Thursday after supporters could not round up enough support from members of the Appropriations Committee.
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