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BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you're still hoping that Apple will one day release a TV set, you might not want to hold your breath. Former Wall Street Journal reporter Yukari Iwatani Kane is set to release a book titled "Haunted Empire: Apple After Steve Jobs," this week. In it, she recounts a moment during one of Steve Jobs' final months where the late Apple chief executive directly told his top executives that the company would not be entering the TV business, according to a Business Insider report . At Jobs' last Top 100 meeting, which is an annual summit for Apple's top executives, Jobs told his staff to ask him anything they wanted.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you're still hoping that Apple will one day release a TV set, you might not want to hold your breath. Former Wall Street Journal reporter Yukari Iwatani Kane is set to release a book titled "Haunted Empire: Apple After Steve Jobs," this week. In it, she recounts a moment during one of Steve Jobs' final months where the late Apple chief executive directly told his top executives that the company would not be entering the TV business, according to a Business Insider report . At Jobs' last Top 100 meeting, which is an annual summit for Apple's top executives, Jobs told his staff to ask him anything they wanted.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1993
When a mini-mall is essentially closed because the police cannot fulfill their function, which is to protect the public and the public's property, the state starts to lose its legitimacy by forcing the landlord and the owner of a small business to try to do what the police cannot do, in essence forcing them out of business. ("Drug-Plagued Complex Put on Notice," Times Valley Edition, Feb. 11) This is an absurdity. WILLIAM PIRONE Sherman Oaks
WORLD
April 21, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
GIZA, Egypt - The woman with crates of unsold tomatoes breathed in the boisterous music of slum life: creaking shutters, squawking chickens, blowing laundry, clattering junkmen. But the ingrained rhythms only angered Hamid Ali Mohamed, who sat in an alley beside her rusting scales and a slim pile of 12 coins, the equivalent of less than $2 for a day's work at the vegetable stand she inherited from her late husband. "Hey!" she yelled at a passing woman. "Why'd you buy those tomatoes from someone else?"
NEWS
April 16, 1985 | United Press International
U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said today that smokers cost their employers about $4,600 each more than nonsmokers annually and are "simply bad business." Koop, addressing about 200 employees of the Cigna Corp. to kick off a company anti-smoking campaign, said smokers miss work 55% more often than nonsmokers and take more breaks than their non-smoking colleagues.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1998 | CLAUDIA ELLER
James Cameron's holiday movie "Titanic" is proving to be a gigantic hit with audiences. The bigger surprise is that the most expensive movie ever made at more than $200 million may actually make a little money. But neither the quality of the film nor the strong box office changes the fact that "Titanic" is a bad business proposition. Even Bill Mechanic, chairman of 20th Century Fox--the film's primary backer--readily admits that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1996
In a city like Los Angeles, rich in its diversity of peoples and cultures, courtesy and respectful behavior are important bonds. The universal niceties enable us to reach across language and other cultural barriers to work and do business together. But when there is a breach in civility, the breakdown costs us all, not in obvious measurable terms but in damage to the spirit of cooperation and goodwill. Take an incident at a South-Central hat shop catering to women.
BOOKS
May 12, 1991 | Ben Stein, Stein's new novel is "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?" (St. Martin's)
Julie Wilson, a sort of Cosmo proto-ad woman, has a problem. In fact, a few problems: Her roommate is a scheming maniac with a punk hairdo (and editor of the contemporary classic "Spineless--Why Men Won't Commit"). Her "boyfriend" is a scheming, passionless, self-obsessed investment banker. Her mother is a ghastly caricature of a Jewish mom, manipulative, critical, and not listening.
SPORTS
June 11, 1993 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commissioner David Stern said here Thursday that the NBA has cleared Michael Jordan of any wrongdoing, amid allegations that he lost more than $1 million in golf bets, but admitted that the league had closed the case without even interviewing the man who made the claim. Stern and Russ Granik, NBA deputy commissioner, said league officials plan to speak with Richard Esquinas, the San Diego man who claims in a new book that Jordan, at one point, owed him $1.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Clothing brand Hollister apologized recently after male models it sent to South Korea sent out several racist tweets, posing squinty-eyed for photos and making rude gestures. But a U.S. official says the mea culpa isn't enough. Michael Yaki, member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, called on Hollister and parent company Abercrombie & Fitch in a letter to “conduct an immediate, public review of its diversity and cultural awareness programs.” He urged the company to take “the more courageous path” and publicly explain why the tweets -- which he called a “grotesque display of stereotypes” -- came to be. Hollister fired the models, who were sent to Seoul to pose with customers at a store opening, and backed away from the social media missives on Facebook.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
“Two years ago they were writing our obituary. Well, it didn't happen. California is back.” That's our governor talking. And he's right. Gov. Jerry Brown delivered his 11th State of the State address Thursday, and as usual, it was as eclectic as its speaker. As The Times reported , Brown “cited Irish poet William Butler Yeats on education, French writer Montaigne on laws, and the biblical story of Joseph and the Pharaoh on financial discipline.” He even defended his bullet-train project -- a too-expensive, too-complicated boondoggle if ever there was one -- by quoting from the children's classic “The Little Engine That Could”:  “I think I can, I think I can. And over the mountain the little engine went.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
You knew it was only a matter of time before the bizarre story of John McAfee's flight from police officials in Belize was turned into a Hollywood film. And, voila, just two months after the antivirus software mogul's saga began, the rights to his story have been purchased by Warner Bros., according to a report in the Hollywood Reporter. Specifically, Warner Bros. purchased the rights to "John McAfee's Last Stand," a story in Wired Magazine by Joshua Davis. Davis will also serve as a producer on the film.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Christine Mai-Duc
John McAfee has been denied political asylum in Guatemala and could be deported back to Belize where he is wanted for questioning in the slaying of neighbor Gregory Faull. Belize officials said they expect McAfee to be flown back to their capital city, 75 miles from the Caribbean island he had called home for several years, according to an Associated Press report. In a fresh blog post Thursday titled "Urgent from John," McAfee implored supporters to "Please email the President of Guatemala and beg him to allow the court system to proceed, to determine my status in Guatemala.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
In another twist to an already bizarre story, the founder of the McAfee anti-virus software company contacted an American journalist Tuesday to maintain his innocence and chronicle how he has been evading police. John McAfee, 67, has been missing since Sunday morning, when his next-door neighbor Gregory Faull, 52, was found dead in a pool of blood in a Belize beachfront home. On Tuesday, McAfee contacted Wired contributing editor Joshua Davis and said he's on the run, scared for his life - and did not commit murder.
OPINION
November 13, 2012
Re “ Boeing plans more cuts in region ,” Nov. 9 As a 40-year aerospace retiree, I was sad to hear of the latest decline of the Southern California aerospace industry, with Boeing cutting more facilities. The article indicates that the cuts are due to the latest reduction in military spending. However, the decline in the once extensive aerospace industry here has been going on for decades. Not surprisingly, this decline coincides with the almost total control of the California government by the Democratic Party and the bad business environment it created.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Clothing brand Hollister apologized recently after male models it sent to South Korea sent out several racist tweets, posing squinty-eyed for photos and making rude gestures. But a U.S. official says the mea culpa isn't enough. Michael Yaki, member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, called on Hollister and parent company Abercrombie & Fitch in a letter to “conduct an immediate, public review of its diversity and cultural awareness programs.” He urged the company to take “the more courageous path” and publicly explain why the tweets -- which he called a “grotesque display of stereotypes” -- came to be. Hollister fired the models, who were sent to Seoul to pose with customers at a store opening, and backed away from the social media missives on Facebook.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
So much for the idea of West is best. In an annual survey, executives ranked California as the worst place to do business for the eighth year in a row. Chief Executive magazine has only been conducting its survey for eight years. Texas has been top-ranked every year. The survey considered responses from 650 business leaders, who graded states on factors such as taxes, regulations, living environment and more. Texas and second-ranked Florida have the highest migration rates in the nation for 2001 through 2009.
OPINION
November 13, 2012
Re “ Boeing plans more cuts in region ,” Nov. 9 As a 40-year aerospace retiree, I was sad to hear of the latest decline of the Southern California aerospace industry, with Boeing cutting more facilities. The article indicates that the cuts are due to the latest reduction in military spending. However, the decline in the once extensive aerospace industry here has been going on for decades. Not surprisingly, this decline coincides with the almost total control of the California government by the Democratic Party and the bad business environment it created.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
With a sense of doom creeping over Europe and labor woes in the U.S., the level of American confidence in June is at a low for the year, according to a preliminary index from Thomson Reuters and the University of Michigan. The measure fell to 74.1 in early June - a six-month low - after reaching a more than four-year high of 79.3 last month. The gauge had gone up for the past nine months. Analysts had expected - and hoped for - better.  Consumer sentiment is considered a bellwether for spending, which accounts for about 70% of the U.S. economy.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
So much for the idea of West is best. In an annual survey, executives ranked California as the worst place to do business for the eighth year in a row. Chief Executive magazine has only been conducting its survey for eight years. Texas has been top-ranked every year. The survey considered responses from 650 business leaders, who graded states on factors such as taxes, regulations, living environment and more. Texas and second-ranked Florida have the highest migration rates in the nation for 2001 through 2009.
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