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NEWS
October 8, 1995 | GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Who is fit to wear a badge? The question rarely has seemed more pressing than in 1995, a year that has seen arrests, scandals and corruption taint the reputation of police departments in major cities across the country. To become a police officer, recruits must undergo a battery of tests that includes a psychological exam, and complete a rigorous academy training that puts them under the close scrutiny of veteran cops serving as instructors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Directed by Brian A. Miller and written by John Chase, "Officer Down" is about a once-bad cop (Stephen Dorff) trying to mend his ways at home and at work. But it's really just an overstuffed story that comes off not as layered but rather as an unfocused jumble. Dorff plays Callahan, whose hazy memories of being shot seem to hold the key to an ongoing case involving the murder of young strippers. Soon, he's drawn back into the sleazy underworld he longs to escape. The film constantly flips between Callahan's past and present (shifting from color to black and white in a way that becomes almost insulting in its assumption that audiences might otherwise not be able to follow along)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2000 | SHAWN HUBLER
As a law enforcement officer, my fundamental duty is to serve mankind--to safeguard lives and property, to protect the innocent against deception, the weak against oppression or intimidation and the peaceful against violence or disorder, and to respect the Constitutional rights of all men to liberty, equality and justice. I will keep my private life unsullied as an example to all . . . --Los Angeles Police Department manual, Section 210.10, Volume I.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2012 | By Margaret Eby
And just like that, "Homeland" is another kind of show. One of the real shames of Season 2 is that the writers couldn't start from the place of ignorance that propelled the tension of the show. The first season, at least the beginning of it, turned us all into conspiracy theorist. It dangled evidence and red herrings, and didn't bother to explain too much about how they fit together. The engine that drives "Homeland" is the audience, and the writers are, in a way, like expert puzzle makers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1994
Diplomacy may always be full of ruse and stage management, but the show being mounted just now in the Bosnian theater is nonetheless remarkable. When the "Contact Group" of five major powers offered a last-chance peace plan in early July, the foreign ministers of Britain and France said that if the plan was rejected, the U.N. forces might have to withdraw. Then, last Monday, as the five met in Moscow, U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali said that if the plan was accepted, the U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2004 | Steve Harvey
I noted here that the LAPD has a Lt. Joel Justice and a Sgt. Bill Justice, who don't, by the way, work together. Retired officer Terry Schauer of Sherman Oaks, however, recalled a couple of sets of longtime partners who were destined to be together -- officers Parrot & Kenary, and officers Sweets & Darling. "The latter team was often accused by citizens of wearing 'phony' name tags when they worked the Hollywood area together," Schauer said. Sort of a Silicone Valley: When an L.A.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was the kind of person everyone liked to have around an office--a prankster and joke teller who could dish out a rash of well-meaning jabs as well as take a joke with an easy smile. Looking back, his friends and colleagues say, Detective Michael Stanewich was something of a hero around the Sheriff Department's Encinitas Station. One year, he dressed up as Santa Claus at an office party, hamming it up with fellow deputies, asking what they wanted for Christmas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1996 | Tom Plate
California's two U.S. senators were in different PacRim capitals last week, working the China issue. One of them was in Beijing, praising China; the other was in Los Angeles, knocking it. So there you had, between the two of these remarkable women, the yin and yang, as it were, for dealing with China. Is this some new kind of "two-China" policy? Maybe. But perhaps this dissonance is the best approach for a difficult future superpower: Play the good cop/bad cop routine and hope something works.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Directed by Brian A. Miller and written by John Chase, "Officer Down" is about a once-bad cop (Stephen Dorff) trying to mend his ways at home and at work. But it's really just an overstuffed story that comes off not as layered but rather as an unfocused jumble. Dorff plays Callahan, whose hazy memories of being shot seem to hold the key to an ongoing case involving the murder of young strippers. Soon, he's drawn back into the sleazy underworld he longs to escape. The film constantly flips between Callahan's past and present (shifting from color to black and white in a way that becomes almost insulting in its assumption that audiences might otherwise not be able to follow along)
BUSINESS
August 18, 1995 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Famed Los Angeles lawyer Howard Weitzman, who made a name rushing to the aid of such celebrities in trouble as Hugh Grant, O.J. Simpson, Michael Jackson and John DeLorean, confirmed Thursday that he is leaving his law practice to join the new management at MCA Inc. as executive vice president of corporate operations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey
Don't dismiss "Premium Rush" as just another action movie. The film centers on a bike messenger in a bad fix, and its grunge sensibility is the antithesis of what we've come to expect from the genre. The bodies, most prominently Joseph Gordon-Levitt's Wilee (as in that speedy cartoon coyote), are more string bean than bulked up. And the most dangerous weapon isn't a weapon at all, but the skill and moxie it takes to race through Manhattan on a bike without brakes. Directed by David Koepp, who co-wrote the clever script with John Kamps, it's got intellect as well.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Suppose a voting issue for you is which presidential candidate would be more likely to acquiesce in an Israeli air raid against Iran'snuclear program. Superficially, it's no contest. Mitt Romney has said there wouldn't be an "inch" between the U.S. and Israel if he were president, and he gave a tough speech in Jerusalem saying that preventing Iran from developing the capacity to build a nuclear weapon "our highest national security priority. " On the other hand, as my colleague Maeve Reston pointed out: "Romney did not explicitly break with the policy set out by his Democratic opponent, President Obama , who has said that no option is off the table when dealing with Iran.
SPORTS
June 1, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
NEWARK, N.J. - The Happiest King cannot be found on the roster, behind the bench, or even among the 126 names in the staff directory. The Happiest King is rarely seen outside of the practice rink, rarely heard outside the dressing room, and still exists almost entirely in your memory. Nobody with a crown on his sweater has ever scored more goals in one season. Yet no King is more invisible as he tries to prod this latest bunch into making a different sort of history. Quick, show of foam fingers, how many knew that Bernie Nicholls was back?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009
Capsule reviews are by Kenneth Turan (K.Tu.), Betsy Sharkey (B.S.) and other reviewers. Compiled by Anthony Miller. Openings WEDNESDAY Alvin and the Chipmunks 2: The Squeakquel The chipmunks head to school to save the music program in a battle of the bands where they face off against the Chipettes. With the voices of Zach Levi, David Cross, Jason Lee, Justin Long, Matthew Gray Gubler, Jesse McCartney, Amy Poehler, Anna Faris and Christina Applegate.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2009 | Robert Abele
Her debut provocation, 1993's "Boxing Helena," revealed the limits of artistic heredity, and now director Jennifer Lynch -- daughter of David -- has returned with the prankish, ultra-violent hell ride "Surveillance." But, again, her quest to unnerve feels forced.
SPORTS
December 19, 2008 | DIANE PUCIN, ON THE MEDIA
It is the hot show among NBA players. At least that's what Gary Payton's text messages tell him. The "NBA GameTime Live" show on Tuesday nights on the NBA TV channel features Payton talking trash, stats and sometimes even cooking with studio host Ahmad Rashad and, as Payton calls him, "the good cop, Chris Webber." "Of course," Payton says, "I'm the bad cop." Payton's chuckle crackles over the phone line.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, by retreating from the idea that trade relations with the Soviet Union should be closely linked to Moscow's actions in Lithuania, risked a quarrel with Congress but avoided setting a potentially dangerous precedent: tying future U.S. policies to the tortuous struggle that lies ahead between the Kremlin and its 15 restive republics.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Van would prefer that parents skip this article. The 5-year-old doesn't want them to know his system for keeping kids out of "trouuuu-ble." It goes like this: * Hide from Mommy and quietly wait for her to give up looking for you. * Let Daddy find you. * Hang your head low and pretend you're a sad puppy. * Wait for Daddy's frown to soften. When it does, say, "Daddy, I looovve you so much!" in a wounded voice. Or try, "You're the best daddy in the whole wide world!"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2008 | CARINA CHOCANO, MOVIE CRITIC
All you need to know about "Pride and Glory," which stars Edward Norton, Colin Farrell, Noah Emmerich and Jon Voight as a family of cops, is contained within the first few scenes. Scene 1: We learn that Ray (Norton), his brother Francis Jr. (Emmerich) and their brother-in-law Jimmy (Farrell) all work for Dad, Francis Sr. (Voight), the chief of Manhattan detectives.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2008 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
Patrick WILSON wanted a piece of Samuel L. Jackson. "I love that challenge," he said of facing off against Jackson in "Lakeview Terrace," which opens Friday. "Maybe it's the athlete in me. You channel those nerves into performance. 'Yep, I'm doing a scene with Sam Jackson, how cool is that?' But then when you're working, it's 'All right, let's get to it.' He didn't want me to back down; he wanted to go toe to toe with someone. I absolutely loved working with him."
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