Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBad Manners
IN THE NEWS

Bad Manners

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
June 19, 2005
Re "Pomp and Conflicting Stances," June 15: Those characters who turned their backs and/or held placards on stage while Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger addressed Santa Monica College graduates certainly made a statement. They showed total disregard for good manners and questionable behavior as academics. I don't question their right to disagree, but I do question the manner in which they chose to do so. I'm glad they aren't teaching my children! Charlene Smoot Santa Monica
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By Stephanie Zacharek, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the movies of Todd Solondz, the world is a horrible place populated by miserable or unkind people. While there's plenty of misery and unkindness in the director's seventh full-length feature,"Dark Horse," Solondz also gives us something new, or at least less self-consciously misanthropic. "Dark Horse" is a glum little sort-of comedy brushed with melancholic sweetness; for once, Solondz seems less interested in scoring points off his characters than in creeping into their shy, sad interior worlds.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 11, 2003
Thanks, Paul Brownfield, for putting into words some of the frustrations we on-timers feel at the general rudeness of people ("My Punctuality Is Killing Me," Dec. 4). Yes, rudeness is what it is. I have had friendships sour over my taking offense at it, and I've even been ridiculed as the person who's wrong. I am a comedian. I can assure you timing is in fact everything. My 9-year-old daughter came home from Hebrew school one day to share how proud she felt about me when her Torah teacher told her that lateness was against Torah teachings because a person must always treat someone as they would want to be treated!
WORLD
February 4, 2012 | By Jonathan Kaiman and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
  At first glance, the newspaper ad depicting an enormous locust looking over the Hong Kong skyline seems like a plug for a horror movie. In fact, it's the latest slap in the face to the millions of mainland Chinese tourists who flood Hong Kong each year, bringing with them what many in the territory see as less-than-refined social habits in addition to their bulging wallets. Mainland tourists stand accused of littering, spitting, urinating in public, smoking cigarettes in inappropriate places and other breaches of etiquette that offend the more fastidious sensibilities of many Hong Kong natives.
IMAGE
January 6, 2008
Regarding "A Bleeping Part of the Job" [Dec. 16]: I am not a prude, but at 65 I have heard all the curse words, including during a stint in a frontline combat unit in the Army in Germany in the early '60s where some NCOs could not mouth a sentence without a few choice vulgarities. In junior high school an English teacher asked several of us to read "The Naked and the Dead" by Norman Mailer. I remember asking Mrs. Stevens what the word "fug" meant, and she said it was a replacement for a vulgar four-letter word also starting with "F."
OPINION
November 18, 2006 | MEGHAN DAUM
DESPITE THE fact that it was 96 degrees a few weeks ago, we are just days away from the official start of the holiday party season. True, many of these parties are thrown by our hair salons, car dealerships and opticians, but it's nice to be included, even if the event is really just an effort to sell us a new pair of Ferragamo frames. However, being invited is one thing, dealing with the invitation is another.
NEWS
June 3, 1996 | Wm. D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been a tough spring for British icons. First it was beef. Now it's civility. A country where "sorry" sometimes seems the most frequently heard word is wondering where it has lost its manners. Rude Britannia. Tribulations over noisy neighbors, uncontrollable grade-school children and violent parents are provoking introspection in a nation where politeness has long been a pillar of civic discourse.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
In the early moments of "Bad Manners," the filmed adaptation of David Gilman's "Ghost in the Machine," middle-aged academics Wes and Nancy Westlund (David Strathairn, Bonnie Bedelia) return to their New England home to find the wife's old college boyfriend Matt (Saul Rubinek) and his latest girlfriend Kim (Caroleen Feeney) standing at the door. Though Matt is expected, it takes a moment for Nancy to recognize him. He's gained so much weight, she says.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | MARCUS ELIASON, Associated Press
In the town of Newcastle-under-Lyme, the Rev. Ian Gregory has founded the Polite Society, dedicated to teaching the British good manners. The mission sounds a bit like teaching the French how to cook or Gary Kasparov to play chess. Bad manners in Britain? Where form letters are still addressed to John Doe Esquire, where they "beg your pardon," stop their cars for pedestrians, apologize when you step on their toes and say "with the greatest respect" when they mean to insult you?
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Don't you think if salmon had any social connections whatsoever they'd bring a couple of killer whales along on their next white water adventure to scare off all those hungry bears? Or they could just teach Bad Manners front man Buster Bloodvessel how to swim upstream like a torpedo. He has the scary looks of a psycho killer in a bad Joe Bob Briggs movie. Actually, he's a nice guy who'd probably have the bears dancing in the river shortly after his ska band kicks in.
SPORTS
January 10, 2012 | T.J. Simers
Try as hard as maybe it appears here at times, I don't dislike everyone in sports. How could I? I've spent time with Alvin Gentry . Sifting through the thousands of athletes, coaches and administrators over the decades of having done this, it's the ones who prove to be human who stand out. Too often it is an athlete being an athlete and the gap widens with reality as fame, money and the crowd of admirers swells. PHOTOS: Lakers vs. Suns "My dad passed away three years ago," Gentry says, "But I clearly remember something he liked to say: 'It's hard work to be a jerk.'" You have no idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2011 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
They can be counted on, week in and week out. Whatever the issue before the Compton City Council, Joyce Kelly, William Kemp and Lynn Boone will be there. They'll arrive early, clutching manila envelopes stuffed with documents. They'll be impeccably dressed: Kelly in a smart outfit with matching hat, Kemp in dapper suit, tie and shoes of ostrich or alligator leather, Boone in high heels and a perfectly coifed do ? blonde by L'Oréal. They will sit in the front row, or on the aisle with easy access to the podium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2009
latimes.com/wardead Remembering California's war dead "This kid was amazing! I remember meeting him; it was at the Bad Manners show in Seattle and he was sitting on the corner of the stage. After that night, it was like me and my husband would drive down to Ft. Lewis and pick him up every weekend. He was always the life of the party, making everyone laugh, smile; he was really close to me and my husband, and he will be missed greatly. I can't put into words really how much Spaz meant to me. I miss him."
AUTOS
January 16, 2008 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Betty Jo McDonald of Camarillo finally found perfect justice meted out to a rude driver on the 101 Freeway not long ago. "I was driving in the fast lane, not driving slow by any means, when a man behind me began tailgating, honking, gesturing and flashing his lights," she recalled. Hemmed in on all sides, she couldn't get out of the speeder's way for a while. "I finally drove 80 to change lanes and get away from this maniac," she said. "To my delight, the Highway Patrol chased him down.
IMAGE
January 6, 2008
Regarding "A Bleeping Part of the Job" [Dec. 16]: I am not a prude, but at 65 I have heard all the curse words, including during a stint in a frontline combat unit in the Army in Germany in the early '60s where some NCOs could not mouth a sentence without a few choice vulgarities. In junior high school an English teacher asked several of us to read "The Naked and the Dead" by Norman Mailer. I remember asking Mrs. Stevens what the word "fug" meant, and she said it was a replacement for a vulgar four-letter word also starting with "F."
OPINION
September 29, 2007 | William Alexander, William Alexander is the author of "The $64 Tomato: How One Man Nearly Lost His Sanity, Spent a Fortune, and Endured an Existential Crisis in the Quest for the Perfect Garden."
Tommy Smothers used to get a laugh on stage by introducing the other half of the act, his brother Dick, with the words, "The person to my left needs no introduction." Followed by a long pause -- and no introduction. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad should have been so lucky Monday when Columbia University President Lee Bollinger secured himself a spot in the toastmaster hall of fame by introducing his guest as "a petty and cruel dictator."
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1980s will never be remembered as the Decade of Good Manners. After all, it was a time when even public figures failed as role models for civility. Who can forget Zsa Zsa Gabor slapping a cop, Morton Downey Jr. mouthing off on his TV talk show, Roseanne Barr mooning the crowd at the 1989 World Series and reports of billionaire hotel queen Leona Helmsley snarling at a waiter: "Your nails aren't clean! Get out of my sight!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By Stephanie Zacharek, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the movies of Todd Solondz, the world is a horrible place populated by miserable or unkind people. While there's plenty of misery and unkindness in the director's seventh full-length feature,"Dark Horse," Solondz also gives us something new, or at least less self-consciously misanthropic. "Dark Horse" is a glum little sort-of comedy brushed with melancholic sweetness; for once, Solondz seems less interested in scoring points off his characters than in creeping into their shy, sad interior worlds.
OPINION
November 18, 2006 | MEGHAN DAUM
DESPITE THE fact that it was 96 degrees a few weeks ago, we are just days away from the official start of the holiday party season. True, many of these parties are thrown by our hair salons, car dealerships and opticians, but it's nice to be included, even if the event is really just an effort to sell us a new pair of Ferragamo frames. However, being invited is one thing, dealing with the invitation is another.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2006
Regarding "Movie Theaters Get Makeovers to Revive Sales," March 5: Movie theaters do not need makeovers to get patrons back. My main reason for not attending more movies is my fellow movie patron. Moviegoers need to be reminded that they are not in their living rooms. And since they cannot seem to adhere to common courtesy, maybe the theaters can step in: Cellphone signals should be blocked in the theaters themselves. Any calls could be made and received in the lobby. Babes in arms and small children should not be allowed into "R"-rated films.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|