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Bad Mood

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SPORTS
April 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
It must be playoff time in Philadelphia. Flyer Coach Ken Hitchcock is grumpy. With a chance to move into a first-place tie in the Atlantic Division this week, the Flyers dropped a home decision to the Toronto Maple Leafs -- who are barely in the Eastern Conference playoff chase. That was Philadelphia's last game until this weekend, when it was scheduled to face division rivals New Jersey and the New York Islanders. The Flyers and Rangers will meet in New York on Tuesday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 7, 2013 | By David Wharton
The tee shot soars across a cold morning sky, carrying down the left side of a long par-five, leaving Rory McIlroy a good look at the green. It is a reminder of what he can do, the talent that once carried him to the top of his sport. The young man from Northern Ireland follows with a decent second shot and a chip, then a lengthy putt for birdie on the fifth hole of Sherwood Country Club. "I feel like for me to be happy," he says, "I need to play sort of pretty golf. " His game has looked slightly more attractive, his mood on the upswing, since he outdueled Adam Scott to win the Australian Open last week.
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NEWS
August 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Georgian soldier who confessed to killing American Fred Woodruff--believed to be a CIA agent--told investigators that he was "in a bad mood" when he fired the fatal shot. Anzor Sharmaidze, 21, was with two companions when the car he was riding in broke down Aug. 8. Officials quoted Sharmaidze as telling investigators that he fired one shot from his Kalashnikov assault rifle at Woodruff's car because it did not stop to pick him up.
SPORTS
February 14, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Syracuse men's basketball Coach Jim Boeheim was probably already in a bad mood after his sixth-ranked team lost to Connecticut, 66-58, Wednesday night. But he got into an even worse mood at the post-game news conference when he was asked a question by ESPN reporter Andy Katz. Katz asked a question about the end of the rivalry between Syracuse and UConn when Boeheim let him have it. "I'll answer anybody's question but yours because you're an idiot and a disloyal person," Boeheim said.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | JACK SMITH
My wife and I were driving north on the Pasadena Freeway the other morning and it suddenly came to me why we live in Southern California--or, specifically, in Los Angeles. It was February. It was a gorgeous day. The blue-denim peaks of the San Gabriel Mountains were shadowed by luminous white cumulous clouds. The car's sunroof was open and the wind was brisk and clean. The freeway, Los Angeles' oldest, was undamaged in the earthquake. It was uncrowded. We felt as if we owned the road.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | JOAN LIBMAN
You sleep through the alarm. The coffee pot breaks and the bus whizzes by without stopping. You sit on the curb and begin to feel the unmistakable dawning of a bad mood. At other times, it's nothing you can put your finger on, just the underlying sense that all the cylinders aren't running, and things are getting off to a bad start. From Stony Brook, N.Y., to Long Beach, Calif., psychologists are trying to learn why our moods change and why we have bad ones. Although conclusions differ, researchers and clinicians at several U.S. universities are beginning to find some answers.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
"If someone at work is snotty or glum or flippant, I find it affects my ability to concentrate on what I'm doing," says Susan Lenser, of Los Angeles, a former TV reporter who now works as a temp in an office with 40 employees. "I wonder, 'Are they angry at me?' "I make a point of being in a good mood. I leave my problems at the door." "When I'm cranky, it brings down everyone I work with," says Eleanor Zeddies, a supervisor at a Burbank coffee shop.
TRAVEL
November 5, 1989
Peter S. Greenberg's article ("It's Time for Business to Get Back to the Basics," Oct. 15) about the lack of service for the traveler is right on target. However, it reminds me that during 15 years of almost weekly travel in the United States, and a total of nearly 30 months' travel throughout Europe over several years, it is amazing how many stupid, ignorant, inefficient and rude people I have met when I was in a bad mood. JAMES T. HUMBERD La Quinta
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
It's no surprise to the perpetually gridlocked: Commuting times are up in Southern California. It takes 10 minutes longer to get to work now than it did a year ago, according to Commuter Computer, the nonprofit transportation research group. The average travel time to work is now a half hour. The trek home averages 40 minutes, or 15 minutes longer than it took a year ago.
SPORTS
February 14, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Syracuse men's basketball Coach Jim Boeheim was probably already in a bad mood after his sixth-ranked team lost to Connecticut, 66-58, Wednesday night. But he got into an even worse mood at the post-game news conference when he was asked a question by ESPN reporter Andy Katz. Katz asked a question about the end of the rivalry between Syracuse and UConn when Boeheim let him have it. "I'll answer anybody's question but yours because you're an idiot and a disloyal person," Boeheim said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2011 | Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19): You're thinking big, and it will be more challenging to make the ends meet. Taurus (April 20-May 20): It's time to do something extra to get the respect you deserve. You sense that it's time to refresh your look. Gemini (May 21-June 21): You will play a game and play it well. Just be careful not to be so enthralled with your own process that you forget to assess the competition. Cancer (June 22-July 22): A loved one will tell all without saying much.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2010 | By Paul Pringle, Los Angeles Times
Army Sgt. Ian T.D. Gelig was so popular in his Stevenson Ranch neighborhood that whenever the paratrooper returned home on leave, his two sisters would keep his visits secret for a while. "We wouldn't tell people he was here because we wanted to hang out with him," said his younger sister, Vanessa, 21, who was sitting in the family living room, photographs of her brother adorning the walls and tabletops. "Otherwise, everybody would be coming over. He had this way with people.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009 | Zachary Pincus-Roth
What do you want to watch during a recession? Hollywood is racking its brain to find out. Foreclosure-free fare such as "Paul Blart: Mall Cop" has performed better than expected, and the conventional wisdom in Hollywood says to keep a light touch.
SPORTS
March 9, 2007 | From Times Staff Reports
Add another item to the list of Lute Olson's gripes with the Pacific 10 Conference. Already a vociferous critic of the conference tournament, the Arizona coach on Thursday said it was "embarrassing" that the all-conference team included only nine players when there were several others deserving of inclusion.
SPORTS
April 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
It must be playoff time in Philadelphia. Flyer Coach Ken Hitchcock is grumpy. With a chance to move into a first-place tie in the Atlantic Division this week, the Flyers dropped a home decision to the Toronto Maple Leafs -- who are barely in the Eastern Conference playoff chase. That was Philadelphia's last game until this weekend, when it was scheduled to face division rivals New Jersey and the New York Islanders. The Flyers and Rangers will meet in New York on Tuesday.
HEALTH
February 18, 2002 | SHANKAR VEDANTAM, WASHINGTON POST
A region of the brain a few inches behind the bridge of the nose may hold the key to why some people have a negative outlook on life, scientists announced last week. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to examine the neurological roots of what scientists call "negative affect," a trait that predisposes people to anxiety, irritability, anger and a range of other unpleasant moods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1986 | From From a Times Staff Writer
An Orange County plumber who claims a co-worker welshed on an agreement to split his winning $100,000 California Lottery ticket failed Wednesday in his efforts to stop payment of the disputed $50,000 until the argument is resolved. Superior Court Judge Jack M. Newman refused to issue a preliminary injunction barring payment of half of Melvin Coleman's ticket, saying Rick Mayes did not appear able to prove in court that Coleman had agreed to the split.
NEWS
November 4, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Gary was the life of the party. When he walked into a room something clicked, recalls his friend Vivian. "You couldn't have a party without him," she says. "He just seemed to lift everyone's mood. I've been to some bad parties, but never any bad parties where Gary was there." Partially bald, with a small paunch, Coke-bottle glasses, a bouncy posture and a corny, joke-cracking style, Gary's knack of sparking a party exemplifies a phenomenon that psychologists are only recently recognizing.
SPORTS
October 30, 2001 | Mark Heisler
Stop me if you've heard this one: Once again, and even more than in their immediate, glorious and only intermittently dysfunctional past, the Lakers and only the Lakers control their destiny. Should they put everything together and play well, no one else has a chance. Of course, by now, who around here doesn't understand how capable they are of coming apart at the seams instead?
SPORTS
December 31, 1999 | JERRY CROWE
Was it only two weeks ago that safety LeRoy Butler of the Green Bay Packers ended his media boycott? Now he won't keep quiet. After Sunday's 29-10 loss to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers dropped the Packers below .500 and put them on the brink of missing the playoffs for the first time since 1992, Butler unloaded on his teammates. "We've got too many [wimps] on our team," he said. "It just showed today. We're not tough. Tough teams go to the playoffs. . . . We don't have any toughness.
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