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Bag Lady

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NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
You know, maybe women really are from Venus. How else to explain these two recent stories in The Times: “Women make better corporate leaders than men, study finds,” and “Almost half of American women fear becoming bag ladies, study says.” Or, as most men would say, “Huh”? But let's take this one step at a time. In the first study, researchers at A.T. Still University in Arizona and McMaster University in Canada surveyed 600 board directors and, as my colleague Stuart Pfeifer writes , came to the conclusion that “women make better corporate leaders than men because they are more likely to make fair decisions when competing interests are at stake.” Male directors, who made up 75% of the survey sample, prefer making decisions using rules, regulations and tradition, the survey found.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 27, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Despite making enormous strides professionally and financially, almost half of American women fear becoming bag ladies, even many of those earning six-figure salaries, according to a new survey. Six in 10 women describe themselves as the primary breadwinners in their households, and 54% manage the family finances, according to the poll by Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America. Even so, 49% fear becoming a bag lady -- a homeless woman who wanders the streets of a city lugging her meager belongings in a shopping bag. Most surprising, 27% of women earning more than $200,000 a year said they fear falling into such destitution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1990 | MIKE WYMA, Wyma is a regular contributor to Valley Calendar
She is a bag lady, literally. She is made of a paper bag. So is the angry man on the wall nearby and the toothless bum and the sleeping wino. The faces are part of a remarkable show, "On the Street/On the Road," continuing through Feb. 6 at the Brand Library Art Galleries in Glendale. Using paper grocery bags, cardboard, acrylic paint and string, artist Peggy Schaps has created three-dimensional portraits of the homeless that are marvels of familiarity.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
You know, maybe women really are from Venus. How else to explain these two recent stories in The Times: “Women make better corporate leaders than men, study finds,” and “Almost half of American women fear becoming bag ladies, study says.” Or, as most men would say, “Huh”? But let's take this one step at a time. In the first study, researchers at A.T. Still University in Arizona and McMaster University in Canada surveyed 600 board directors and, as my colleague Stuart Pfeifer writes , came to the conclusion that “women make better corporate leaders than men because they are more likely to make fair decisions when competing interests are at stake.” Male directors, who made up 75% of the survey sample, prefer making decisions using rules, regulations and tradition, the survey found.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1985
"It was a strange feeling," Lucille Ball said. "I mean, there I was sitting on a pile of garbage bags on Madison Avenue, people passing by, and nobody taking the slightest notice." The reason, of course, is that swathed in bundles of old clothing and heavily made up, she looked like just another bag lady. And New Yorkers are used to them. Nobody noticed the camera being set up across the street. "Stone Pillow," airing Nov. 5 at 9 p.m. on CBS, marks Ball's first dramatic appearance on TV.
NEWS
June 17, 1985 | GARY LIBMAN
Each week Lucy Rosenwald takes her white Rolls-Royce from her high-rise Century City condominium to become a bag lady. Driving to the homes of West Los Angeles friends, Rosenwald, 66, fills the trunk and back seat of her white Silver Shadow with newspapers, bottles and cans. Then she motors to a West Los Angeles recycling center where she loads the newspapers into a large cart and carries bags of bottles and cans to a scale. She collects about $4.50 and sends it to a home for the blind.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1985
In one of her rare dramatic appearances, Lucille Ball is cast as an elderly New York City shopping bag lady in "Stone Pillow," a new TV movie which CBS has scheduled for airing Nov. 5 (9-11 p.m.). That will put Lucy opposite part II of ABC's 12-hour miniseries, "North and South," which kicks off Nov.3. "North and South" is based on the John Jakes book set in pre-Civil War times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1985 | KATHLEEN H. COOLEY, Times Staff Writer
She made her daily rounds at the beach, collecting aluminum cans and old newspapers in her shopping cart. She dressed in layers of clothes and a scarf over her hair, and her territory was Mission Boulevard and Garnet Avenue. To hundreds of Pacific Beach residents, she was known only as "Joanne the Bag Lady."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1986
An illegal alien convicted of attempting to rape and murder a bag lady in a Pacific Beach restroom was sentenced Tuesday to 12 years in state prison. San Diego Superior Court Judge Norbert Ehrenfreund rejected a motion for a new trial by Jose Hernandez Herrera's attorney, Michael Popkins, who said there was insufficient evidence of an intent to kill. "Every bone in her face was broken," Ehrenfreund said. "She would have died without medical help." Sara Rutledge, 55, was attacked about 3 a.m.
SPORTS
June 1, 1989
Patty Sheehan, known on the Ladies Professional Golf Assn. tour for her knickers, her jokes and her easy smile, has a new trademark. She's become the M&Ms lady. Sheehan, who two months ago signed a sponsorship deal with M&M Mars Inc., the maker of the colorful chocolate candies, has become a sort of sugary pied piper. "All the kids love me," she said. Lest anyone miss the point, Sheehan's golf bag is dark-brown and carries the M&Ms logo. And she carries bags of the candy to hand out. "I probably have 10 bags in my bag, but I've probably got 400 bags in the locker room," Sheehan said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2011
Whether she's the crotchety neighbor nosing around Wisteria Lane on "Desperate Housewives" or the president's sharp-tongued executive secretary on "The West Wing," Kathryn Joosten makes the most of her few scenes, delivering withering one-liners in her crazy/wise style. Now the actress takes to the stage for the first time in more than a decade in Tracy Letts' "Superior Donuts" at the Geffen Playhouse. What attracted you to this play? Lady Boyle. What a great character to play, and there aren't too many words.
OPINION
July 27, 2008
Re "Sack the bags," editorial, July 22 Your editorial description of plastic bags as an "environmental atrocity" is a semantic atrocity. The obsession with plastic bags is staggering. Myths about plastic bags abound on the misinformation superhighway. We have found it necessary to create a website in an attempt to address the unfair and absurd stigma that has attached to plastic bags. We have also sued Los Angeles County for adopting a phased ban of plastic bags. We contend that the county based its action on a one-sided report that cherry-picked facts with the goal of justifying a ban. We hope the court will force the county to conduct an objective analysis with the goal of finding the truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A decade before "Look Back in Anger" (hilarious "SCTV" parody: "Look Back in a Bloody Rage") and the British angry-young-man vogue, playwright Christopher Fry rose to prominence. He did so with characters less angry than philosophical about humankind and its follies, speaking in plummy blank verse. "The Lady's Not for Burning" (1948) may be Fry's best-known play in America, but it still hasn't seen much stateside action in recent decades.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | From staff and wire reports
The handful of designers who make clothes to order for a slightly larger handful of their impossibly rich customers showed spring collections in Paris this week notable, as always, for sparkling ideas executed with admirable restraint and a few unfortunate cases of wretched excess. (And we're not just referring to the prices, which can easily range into the upper five figures for a single outfit.
NEWS
December 2, 1998 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blitzen Blitzkrieg Bureau: Playing off the success of computer games that simulate deer hunting, Simon & Schuster Interactive has released Deer Avenger, a CD-ROM in which a weapon-toting deer stalks human hunters. According to Newsday, players take on the role of a buck armed with a slingshot, an M-16 and a bazooka.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1994
Re Lewis Segal's review of my piece ("Compelling Visions in 'Borders,' " May 23): "Filename: FUTURFAX" was misspelled. As anyone with a computer knows, file names can't have over eight letters. The piece may not belong in a dance series, but then, by the same token, it should not be reviewed by a dance reviewer--nor, for that matter, should any of my pieces. I don't do "grandiose earth-mother or queen-bitch roles"; I have played the Earth (in a very unmotherly way) and the Death Crone (ditto)
NEWS
May 9, 1985 | United Press International
A traveler who was stabbed nine times by a "bag lady" in Pennsylvania Station was in stable condition Wednesday and was expected to make a full recovery from the attack, authorities said. Carol Buckhout, 31, of Columbus, Ohio, was stabbed Tuesday afternoon as she washed her hands in a restroom at the bustling station, said Amtrak spokeswoman Marci Larson. The attack was apparently unprovoked, she said.
NEWS
November 24, 1985
The Television Times cover of Nov. 3 poignantly depicted Lucille Ball as a bag lady. Unfortunately, her movie "Stone Pillow" involved an unbelievable "Cinderella" rendition that at best offered fantasy hope to the many homeless now awaiting their rescue by a benevolent social worker. Connie Barnato, Granada Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH
The three one-acts in Michael Lewis' "Signs," at Los Feliz Playhouse, have the same broad facility with dialogue that marked his "Prisoners," seen earlier this year at the Complex. But Lewis still seems to be an author in search of something important to say. The only successful one-act here is "Strike," a sort of fugue in racial bigotry. Lewis is a fine Archie Bunker as the group leader, and Phil Jimenez's performance appreciates the subtlety in the writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1990 | MIKE WYMA, Wyma is a regular contributor to Valley Calendar
She is a bag lady, literally. She is made of a paper bag. So is the angry man on the wall nearby and the toothless bum and the sleeping wino. The faces are part of a remarkable show, "On the Street/On the Road," continuing through Feb. 6 at the Brand Library Art Galleries in Glendale. Using paper grocery bags, cardboard, acrylic paint and string, artist Peggy Schaps has created three-dimensional portraits of the homeless that are marvels of familiarity.
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