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Baggage Fees

NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Recent surveys reinforce what you already know and likely fume about: Fliers hate baggage fees more than any other fee tacked on to airfares. Travel booking website Fly.com confirmed that prevailing sentiment when it asked hundreds of its users about airline fees. But it also learned what perks fliers would be willing to pay for. That's where things get interesting. Far be it from me to encourage airlines to come up with more ways to squeeze consumers, but maybe passengers wouldn't feel so ripped off if they were paying for things they actually wanted.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 2010
The Department of Transportation on Wednesday proposed new rules for airlines on overbooking and other passenger concerns. Officials said they hope to enact them by fall. Here are some of the proposed changes. Overbooking: If an airline denies a paying passenger a seat because of overbooking, the airline would be required to pay up to $650 if a passenger is put on another domestic flight that arrives at the final destination one to two hours after the original flight. Compensation would go up to $1,300 if a passengers is put on a domestic flight that arrives more than two hours later.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Fees to check bags and change reservations generated $1.6 billion for the nation's largest airlines in July through September, according to new federal data. The total represents a 5% increase over the same period last year, when the nation's airlines collected $1.5 billion from checked bag fees and charges for changing flight reservations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Airlines began to charge baggage fees and other extra passengers fees about four years ago in response to a decline in demand during the economic recession and a surge in fuel prices.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger, This post has been updated. See below for details
If airfares seem a little higher than usual, it's not because the airlines have raised their prices. The Department of Transportation's long-awaited new rules on what airlines can advertise as posted ticket prices go into effect Thursday. I think of it as the "no surprises" rule. The biggest change: Published airfares (online, on billboards, in print, over the phone) must include all taxes and fees. The idea is that consumers looking for the lowest airfare won't be misled by super-low prices that increase exponentially after fees and taxes are added on. The rule applies to airlines, ticket agents and online travel booking sites like Expedia, Orbitz, etc. Kayak, however, already publishes the total cost of airfares on its site.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2008 | Peter Pae
American Airlines announced new baggage fees and other charges Wednesday. Specific rules regarding the new fees can be found at American's website at www.aa.com. -- When do the new and higher fees take effect? The $15 fee for the first checked bag will take effect June 15, but American began imposing other new charges, such as for reservation help and pet handling, Wednesday. -- Why is American raising and adding fees? The airline says the fees are necessary to recover the cost of escalating oil prices, which have tripled its fuel expenses from about 13% of revenue in 2000 to 36% of revenue in the first quarter of this year.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Baggage fees are still a source of anger, but passengers are more accepting of them, according to a survey on airline satisfaction. In fact, overall satisfaction with air travel has increased to the highest level since 2006, according to the J.D. Power & Associates airline satisfaction study for 2013. Airline satisfaction improved to 695 points on a 1,000-point scale, up 14 points from 2012, according to the study, which measured satisfaction on such factors as cost, in-flight services, boarding and flight crew.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2012 | By Pat Benson
New airline fees could be coming. That's the take of George Hobica, founder of Airfarewatchdog.com , a low-airfare alert and air travel advice website. Hobica talked with airline industry reporter Hugo Martin about trends in airline fees. The latest comes from Spirit Airlines, whose website lists 72 fees in eight different categories, including baggage fees, seat fees and on-board food and drink fees. Spirit, the first U.S.-based carrier to impose a fee for carry-on bags, this week announced that it will soon begin charging $100 if passengers show up to the gate with a carry-on bag instead of paying ahead of time.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Faced with higher fuel prices, airlines have come up with a variety of fees to make money on top of airfares. Take Spirit Airlines, whose website lists 72 fees in eight different categories, including baggage fees, seat fees and onboard food and drink fees. Spirit, the first U.S.-based carrier to impose a fee for carry-on bags, this week announced that it will soon begin charging $100 if passengers show up to the gate with a carry-on bag instead of paying ahead of time. That's up from $45. LIVE VIDEO DISCUSSION: Join us at 2 p.m. today Airline industry reporter Hugo Martin will discuss airline fees with George Hobica, founder of Airfarewatchdog.com , a low-airfare alert and air travel advice website.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Spirit Airlines , the first carrier to impose fees for carry-on bags, starting in November will charge as much as $100 per bag for passengers who bring luggage to stow in the overhead bin.  It currently costs $45 if you show up at the gate with a carry-on bag. That figure will rise to $100 on Nov. 6, according to baggage fees listed on the airline's website.  Spirit has a dizzying menu of bag fees that are tied to the...
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