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Baggage Fees

TRAVEL
June 19, 2011
Jane Engle missed an obvious and overwhelmingly important point in her story ["Are We There Yet?," June 12]. Since Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists armed with bombs have twice attempted to board aircraft, with the intention of destroying the aircraft. Both of them were successful in getting through the security inspection and on to the aircraft. They both attempted to detonate their bombs in flight. The only reason that they did not succeed was their own incompetence, combined with the intervention of passengers.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The nation's largest airlines collected $3.4 billion in fees charged to passengers for checking luggage last year, a 24% increase over 2009, according to new federal data released Monday. The baggage fees are not the only extra revenue collected by airlines. The airlines last year also took in $2.3 billion in fees charged to passengers to change reservations, down about 3% from the previous year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. The agency has yet to calculate other miscellaneous airline revenue for 2010, including charges for in-flight food and beverages, and fees to board early, to access in-flight Wi-Fi services and to transport pets, among other charges.
TRAVEL
April 24, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel Editor
Question: I have been shopping for fares to London. Cheapoair.com indicated a price of $688, which excluded taxes. When I clicked "book," the price was nearly $900. When I go to British Airways, Travelocity or Orbitz, it clearly indicates "excluding taxes and fees. " Doesn't that seem more honest? -- Tina Yates, Los Angeles Answer: Answer: For now, let's substitute the word "clearer" for "more honest. " We would not want to impugn the integrity of a travel provider.
TRAVEL
April 17, 2011
Baggage scofflaws and their scoffers Regarding "Bag-Fee Dodger" [On the Spot, March 27] by Catharine Hamm: My wife and I recently returned from a 15-day cruise. We flew to Miami, Miami to Rio de Janeiro, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to Dallas, and Dallas to LAX, all on American. The American Airlines representative's quote in the article about gate agents asking passengers to check excess items is nonsense. At no time was the carry-on bag rule enforced. I saw people carrying oversized bags, two or three bags plus a laptop computer and musical instruments and tennis rackets into the cabin as carry-on luggage.
TRAVEL
March 6, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Question: My wife and I traveled to Ireland by way of Paris on Aer Lingus. When we got to Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris, an agent eyeballed our bags and said they exceeded the weight limit and that we owed 600 euros (about $800) total. Can this be right? Chester Tadeja, Chino Answer: Mon Dieu , or, said another way, the airline may be right because it says it's right. Aer Lingus is certain that Tadeja's bags were overweight and says it has the paperwork to prove it. Tadeja says no, that the counter agent just looked at those bags.
NEWS
January 12, 2011 | By Terry Gardner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Wouldn’t it be nice to know how an airline may treat you in advance? TripAdvisor thinks so. On Wednesday, the travel website, best known for its user reviews of hotels, added user reviews to its flight search engine, TripAdvisor Flights . Jami Counter, senior director of TripAdvisor Flights, said the website has so far collected more than 3,500 airline ratings from travelers, "and we expect it to grow quickly.” Airlines are rated from 1 to 5 "stars" and also by the percentage of travelers who recommend them.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Fees that may make fliers gnash their teeth proved to be big money for airlines this year. How big? The top 20 carriers made $2.6 billion in baggage fees and $1.7 billion in reservation cancellation or change fees in the first three quarters of 2010, a Bureau of Transportation Statistics report said Monday. So that may mean more fees are on the way. Continental Airlines, for example, rolled out a new optional fee Monday called FareLock that allows you to "lock in" an airfare that you like for three or seven days – for fees that start at $5 and $9, respectively.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2010 | By Julie Johnsson
The sky appears to be the limit when it comes to the money airlines make by charging passengers to check luggage. The 20 largest U.S. carriers collected $906.4 million in baggage-related revenue during the third quarter, a 23% jump from the same period a year earlier, according to data released Monday by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. International fees adopted this year, a rebound in air travel and growing passenger frustration over limited overhead space in airplane cabins all contributed to the skyrocketing fee income, observers said.
TRAVEL
October 23, 2010 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
As a frequent flier, I have long wondered about the legality of charging baggage fees for those of us who are disabled and can't use the overhead bins. I have a bad shoulder, and flight attendants will not assist me. It seems to me that airlines should not charge a fee for bags for people who are disabled. Does the Americans With Disabilities Act apply? Audray Johnson Riverside Answer: The Air Carrier Access Act, a cousin to the Americans With Disabilities Act, applies.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Early next year, Singapore Airlines will begin to install technology in dozens of planes to let passengers surf the Internet and send e-mail from 35,000 feet in the air, the airline announced last week. The circuitry that the air carrier will install in at least 40 long-haul jets by 2013 would also allow passengers to make airborne cellphone calls. But Singapore Airline remains undecided whether to allow cellphone calls. "As we get closer to the launch date, we will decide whether voice calling in the cabin will be activated," said James Boyd, a spokesman for Singapore Airlines.
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