Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBahman Ghobadi
IN THE NEWS

Bahman Ghobadi

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
In the opening scene of Iranian Kurdish director Bahman Ghobadi's "Turtles Can Fly," a cluster of Kurdistani children in Northern Iraq stands in a field holding up TV antennas like kites. ("Sexy channels" are prohibited by Saddam Hussein; news channels are not.) The antennas are for gathering information on the upcoming war, which might as well be Christmas for the excitement it's generated among villagers and refugees.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Rock's beginning was all about youth and rebellion and risk, a bit of history that tends to get lost in an "American Idol" world. So "No One Knows About Persian Cats," a heart-pounding descent into the illegal underground music scene of Tehran comes at you like the scream of an electric guitar. Director Bahman Ghobadi shot it on the run in just 17 days and without a government permit, a choice that landed the crew in jail twice during the production. The camera, also not allowed unless it's rented from the state, could have been confiscated at any time.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2010 | By Saul Austerlitz
The state of Iranian film, circa 2010, is like Iran in miniature: anxious, uncertain and riven by dissension. And interviewing an Iranian filmmaker, like "No One Knows About Persian Cats" director Bahman Ghobadi, is an experience in stereophonic sound: the director and his translator spend as much time arguing over his responses as he spends actually answering questions. Ghobadi is frustrated, and rightly so.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2010 | By Saul Austerlitz
The state of Iranian film, circa 2010, is like Iran in miniature: anxious, uncertain and riven by dissension. And interviewing an Iranian filmmaker, like "No One Knows About Persian Cats" director Bahman Ghobadi, is an experience in stereophonic sound: the director and his translator spend as much time arguing over his responses as he spends actually answering questions. Ghobadi is frustrated, and rightly so.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Rock's beginning was all about youth and rebellion and risk, a bit of history that tends to get lost in an "American Idol" world. So "No One Knows About Persian Cats," a heart-pounding descent into the illegal underground music scene of Tehran comes at you like the scream of an electric guitar. Director Bahman Ghobadi shot it on the run in just 17 days and without a government permit, a choice that landed the crew in jail twice during the production. The camera, also not allowed unless it's rented from the state, could have been confiscated at any time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Bahman Ghobadi vowed last fall he would never come to the United States again. He even went so far as to return a prize he received in October at the Chicago Film Festival for his latest movie, "Marooned in Iraq," after U.S. authorities refused to grant Iran's most prominent Kurdish director a visa to pick up the honor. "I waited five months for a visa but wasn't granted one," says the 35-year-old director through an interpreter. "I had already been to the U.S. three times.
WORLD
April 23, 2009 | Ramin Mostaghim and Jeffrey Fleishman
His girlfriend is in jail for espionage and acclaimed Kurdish Iranian film director Bahman Ghobadi is thinking about packing up his scripts and editing equipment and heading to Europe. He is tired, he says, of censors and Islamic politics intruding upon his life and art. But Ghobadi, director of spare, poetic films such as "A Time for Drunken Horses," doesn't want to go anywhere until his girlfriend, Roxana Saberi, is freed on appeal.
NEWS
February 9, 2010
Iranian cinema: An article in Friday's Calendar section about the "20th Annual Celebration of Iranian Cinema" at the Billy Wilder Theatre in Westwood misspelled the last name of filmmaker Bahman Ghobadi as Gohbadi. In addition, the article described the plot of the film "About Elly" as a drama about a woman who disappears while on a pleasure cruise. The woman is on a pleasure trip, not a cruise. If you believe that we have made an error, or you have questions about The Times' journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Deirdre Edgar, readers' representative, by e-mail at readers.
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | Lynn Smith
The Malaysian censorship board has banned the local release of "Marooned in Iraq," a film by acclaimed Iranian director Bahman Ghobadi, which details the effect of Saddam Hussein's chemical attacks on the Iraqi Kurds in 1988, according to the British trade publication Screen International. Censorship Film Malaysia described "Marooned in Iraq" as a weapon of U.S. propaganda that could "dangerously jeopardize relations between Malaysia and Iraq."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2000
"A Time for Drunken Horses," the fifth film in this fall's Shooting Gallery Film Series, moves today from the Loews Beverly Center Cinemas to Landmark's Westside Pavilion Cinemas, 10800 W. Pico Blvd. between Westwood Boulevard and Overland Avenue. The series, which began in 1999, has spawned such independent successes as "Croupier" and "Judy Berlin."
WORLD
April 23, 2009 | Ramin Mostaghim and Jeffrey Fleishman
His girlfriend is in jail for espionage and acclaimed Kurdish Iranian film director Bahman Ghobadi is thinking about packing up his scripts and editing equipment and heading to Europe. He is tired, he says, of censors and Islamic politics intruding upon his life and art. But Ghobadi, director of spare, poetic films such as "A Time for Drunken Horses," doesn't want to go anywhere until his girlfriend, Roxana Saberi, is freed on appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
In the opening scene of Iranian Kurdish director Bahman Ghobadi's "Turtles Can Fly," a cluster of Kurdistani children in Northern Iraq stands in a field holding up TV antennas like kites. ("Sexy channels" are prohibited by Saddam Hussein; news channels are not.) The antennas are for gathering information on the upcoming war, which might as well be Christmas for the excitement it's generated among villagers and refugees.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Bahman Ghobadi vowed last fall he would never come to the United States again. He even went so far as to return a prize he received in October at the Chicago Film Festival for his latest movie, "Marooned in Iraq," after U.S. authorities refused to grant Iran's most prominent Kurdish director a visa to pick up the honor. "I waited five months for a visa but wasn't granted one," says the 35-year-old director through an interpreter. "I had already been to the U.S. three times.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The intriguing title of Kurdish Iranian filmmaker Bahman Ghobadi's "A Time for Drunken Horses" comes from a practice of Kurds along the rugged Iran-Iraq border. They get their dray animals, mainly mules, inebriated in order to be able to drive them back and forth across the border in severe winter weather as they transport smuggled goods into Iraq. Ghobadi describes his beautiful, heart-rending film, a co-winner of the Camera d'Or at Cannes 2000, as "a humble tribute to my cultural heritage."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Bahman Ghobadi's "Marooned in Iraq," a lusty affirmation of life in the face of catastrophe, opens in the wake of the Gulf War with Saddam Hussein turning his wrath on the Kurds. For centuries this large ethnic group has lived in a mountainous region of Southwest Asia known as Kurdistan but which falls into Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria. The Kurds have endured endless hardship, oppression and, at the hands of Saddam, genocide.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|