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Baked Goods

ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1999 | JASON KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They called 'em gut bombs and fat pills. They were the midnight snack of choice, the breakfast of champions, a tasty treat with a hot cup of coffee that went a long way to fueling the force that patrols the mean streets of California. A doughnut shop was one of the few rest stops open 24 hours, where a cop could remain on standby, near a squad car radio, awaiting the first cue from a dispatcher that something was not right in the world.
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NEWS
April 24, 1999 | The Washington Post
Friday was Shakespeare's 435th birthday. And as she has for 15 years, Columbine High School teacher Carol Samson had asked her advanced placement English students to each bake a cake and decorate it with their favorite quote from the Bard. Normally, Samson's students take their literary cakes to the school cafeteria to share with the student body. But this week, one of her students was killed and three are lying in local hospitals.
NEWS
April 13, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Brownie Mary" Rathbun, the gray-haired rebel whose arrests for giving marijuana-laced brownies to dying AIDS patients bolstered the medicinal marijuana movement, died Saturday of a heart attack in a San Francisco nursing home. She was 77. Rathbun became a fixture of San Francisco's Castro district in the 1970s when, carrying a napkin-lined basket, she sold her self-described "magical brownies" for $2 to $4 apiece to passersby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1999 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A famous deep-fried Southern sin has come west. Krispy Kreme doughnuts--a Deep South staple for 61 years--opened its first California shop in La Habra on Tuesday, and a line was waiting out the door at 5:30 a.m. Some might say Krispy Kreme is a strange culinary interloper in a land fabled for granola, sprouts and holistic health. But truth be told, the chain is venturing into the nation's doughnut capital; Southern California's 1,600 doughnut stores give it more per capita than any other region.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A famous deep-fried Southern sin has come West. Krispy Kreme doughnuts--a Deep South staple for 61 years--opened its first California shop in La Habra on Tuesday and a line was waiting out the door at 5:30 a.m. Some might believe Krispy Kreme is a strange culinary interloper in a land fabled for granola, sprouts and holistic health.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1999 | Eleanor Yang
East Coast bakery chain Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Corp. opened the first of 42 planned Southern California stores in La Habra, plunging into a region with the nation's highest number of doughnut shops per capita. "There are 1,600 doughnut stores in Southern California. To us, that shows demand," said Roger Glickman, president of Great Circle Family Foods of Los Angeles, which is building and operating all Southland Krispy Kreme franchises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1998 | YUNG KIM
At the Orange County Fair, culinary choices range from eggroll on a stick to barbecue brisket sandwiches. But for many, the funnel cake remains the king of fair food. Whether topped with powdered sugar, apples and cinnamon, strawberries and cream, or all of the above, the traditional fair pastry continues to be a hit. "Funnel cake is the thing here," said Tommie Fomby, deputy manager of the fair, who likes the pastry plain. "Right now it's so good."
BUSINESS
July 15, 1998
Winchell's, attempting to jazz up its image, introduced two new "flavored-dough" doughnuts--Very Berry Blueberry Burst and Cocoa Cabana Banana Nut--which contain ingredients similar to those used in its blueberry and banana nut muffins. It's one of several moves to bolster sales. The Santa Ana company is repainting aging stores and attempting to put outlets in airports and on college campuses.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Winchell's introduced two "flavored-dough" doughnuts on Tuesday in what the company's top executive said is an attempt to "create a little bit of excitement" in a fairly staid industry. The 50-year-old company, which is based in Santa Ana, is trying different tacks to reposition itself and jazz up its image. It's repainting aging stores and dabbling in dual-branding--selling doughnuts under the same roof with another brand name product.
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