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Baking Powder

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FOOD
April 5, 1990 | JOAN DRAKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: I understand there is a test to check the effectiveness of baking powder. Can you please tell me what it is? Answer: You can test whether baking powder is still effective by mixing one teaspoon of the powder with one-third cup of hot water. If the baking powder is still active, it will bubble vigorously. Q: Some pie and tart recipes call for filling the shell with rice or beans and baking briefly before filling.
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FOOD
June 12, 2013
  Total time: 40 min. 4 pints strawberries, rinsed and hulled 1/4 cup sugar 10 shortcakes 2 cups whipping cream, whipped Cut strawberries in half and toss with sugar. Set aside 1/2 hour. Split each Shortcake while still warm. Spoon plenty of strawberries over bottom of each shortcake, top with generous spoonful of whipped cream and set top half of Shortcake on top. Makes 10 servings. Each serving contains about: 380 calories; 263 mg sodium; 82 mg cholesterol; 25 grams fat; 36 grams carbohydrates; 4 grams protein; 0.70 gram fiber.
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FOOD
May 15, 1986 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: I don't bake very often and seem to have problems with baking powder. After it has been opened for a few months, it loses its leavening power. Do you have any suggestions on how to handle it? Answer: Moisture and age are the two biggest enemies of baking powder. Store the powder in as dry an area as possible and be sure the lid is sealed tightly after each use. Use a clean, dry spoon when measuring so moisture will not set off any chemical reaction and lessen the product's potency.
FOOD
May 11, 2013 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: On a trip up the coast of Maine, we found a wonderful bakery in Portland called Standard Baking Co. Everything was delicious, but my husband declared the oatmeal cookies the best he'd ever had, and we made a special detour on the return route to buy more cookies. I'd love it if you could obtain their recipe, so I could surprise him with a batch. Helene Morrison Arroyo Grande Dear Helene: If I didn't know how easy they were to make, I'd plan a vacation in the area just so I could get my fix of these cookies.
NEWS
December 3, 2001
The goal of both substances is to produce carbon dioxide in a batter to make cakes or bread rise. Both are used in preference to yeast because they work much faster--a few minutes for the chemicals versus two to three hours for yeast. Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate. When exposed to an acid, it produces gaseous carbon dioxide. Baking soda is usually used in recipes that also use an acidic liquid, like buttermilk or yogurt.
FOOD
March 30, 1989 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Biscuits picked up at fast-food restaurants or popped out of cans found in supermarket refrigerated cases and simply baked have become so popular that many cooks no longer make these quick breads from scratch. However, if you need a particular size, such as 1-inch for appetizers, or want to make cheese or herb variations, it's surprisingly quick and easy to turn out a batch of baking powder biscuits.
FOOD
August 25, 1988 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: I picked up a package of self-rising flour by mistake. Can you tell me how to substitute it for regular flour? Answer: In "The New Doubleday Cookbook" (Doubleday: 1985, $16.95), authors Jean Anderson and Elaine Hanna define self-rising four as "enriched all-purpose flour to which baking powder and salt have been added.
FOOD
August 5, 2009
As easy as 1, 2, 3, 4 Your basic American yellow cake is made from flour, sweetened with sugar, given structure with eggs, enriched and tenderized with butter, leavened with baking powder and flavored with vanilla and a little salt. You may have all the ingredients to make a cake on hand right now. The most common recipe is known as 1-2-3-4 cake, because it uses 1 cup each of milk and butter (that's two sticks of butter), 2 cups of sugar, 3 cups of flour and 4 eggs. (Actually, it also needs one-half teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon vanilla and 2 teaspoons of baking powder, so I suppose it's really the 1-2-3-4 plus 1/2 -1-2 cake.)
FOOD
September 12, 2001 | Charles Perry
Moisture in the air gradually robs baking powder of its strength. One way to slow the process is to keep your baking powder in an air-tight container. King Arthur Flour sells a cool-looking stainless steel canister with a lock-seal acrylic lid and even offers a combo deal: the canister plus 8 ounces of MaineBakewell Cream baking powder, a New England favorite that contains no aluminum. King Arthur Flour baking powder canister, $11.75; with baking powder, $12.
FOOD
January 2, 1992 | ABBY MANDEL
Who eats muffin bottoms? Just about everybody prefers the tops. Which is why I invented "muffies." They're baked on a baking sheet instead of a muffin tin and have no bottoms. The muffie has a lot going for it: Two cups of muffin batter, which customarily makes four to six muffins, is enough for 16 muffies. And they take much less time to bake, usually less than 10 minutes (you don't want to overbake them). I prefer them just lightly browned so they stay a little moist and soft inside.
FOOD
April 27, 2013
It's an adage passed down by expert Nathalie Dupree in her cookbook "Southern Biscuits": "No two cooks make the same biscuit. " Some swear by cream or a mix of baking powder and baking soda. Some drop their biscuits from a spoon instead of cutting them out. Some people use butter instead of lard, or shortening instead of butter. They cut them big or cut them small. They might dunk each one in melted butter before baking, the way James Beard did. But there are a few tips everyone can follow for better biscuits.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Baking soda and baking powder are only as good as their freshness when it comes to baking in the kitchen. Used to leaven everything from cakes and biscuits to doughnuts and waffles (like Jackie Kennedy's waffle recipe, which can be found below), they're the ingredients that help a dough rise as it bakes. And like any ingredient, they can lose their effectiveness as they age, and there's nothing worse than having a cake fail because the ingredients weren't any good. Because they do lose effectiveness with time, it's best to buy both baking soda and powder in small quantities.
FOOD
June 30, 2012 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: I recently moved from San Luis Obispo to Denver. I miss the berry bars at House of Bread in San Luis; they were my favorite breakfast after a run or before class, and they were even my last meal before commencing the 18-hour drive from SLO to Denver! I'd love the recipe so I can have a slice of my old college town here in my new big city. Thank you! Gabby Robinson Denver Dear Gabby: These bars are rich and buttery, with nice tart and sweet notes from the jam, and you might never guess how easy they are to make.
FOOD
July 7, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear SOS: I love the Sweetie Pies Bakery in Napa Valley. Last time, I tried the sweet-glazed currant scone. Would it be possible to get the recipe? Elisabeth Anders Napa Valley Dear Elisabeth: Sweetie Pies Bakery folds the small but brightly flavored currants with fresh orange zest in these wonderfully flaky scones. Drizzle over a sweet orange-scented glaze, and they make a delightful breakfast or a perfect snack. Sweetie Pie's orange breakfast scones Our recipes, your kitchen: If you try this or any other recipe from the L.A. Times Test Kitchen, we would like to know about it so we can showcase it on our food blog and occasionally in print.
FOOD
April 7, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear SOS: I absolutely love the butterscotch brownie at Clementine in Los Angeles . It's chewy and full of brown-sugary goodness — the perfect afternoon treat or sweet for a picnic. I'd love to be able to make it at home. Would you be able to find the recipe for me? Mindy Nyby Los Angeles Dear Mindy: Tender, rich and temptingly sweet, Clementine's butterscotch brownies balance that brown-sugary goodness with a nice hint of salt to make this the perfect treat for almost any occasion.
HOME & GARDEN
September 11, 2010
Ideas to steal Some tips used in Priscilla Woolworth's home: Instead of using dryer sheets, add a few drops of lavender essential oil to a wash cloth and toss it in with your drying laundry. Instead of using chemicals to unblock a plugged drain, pour a cup of baking powder down the drain followed by a half-cup of vinegar. Wait 10 minutes, then pour in boiling water from a teakettle. Instead of using a chemical furniture cleaner, dust your wooden pieces with a few drops of olive oil on a rag. Instead of using chemical weed killer on patios and driveways, pour boiling water onto the weed from a teakettle.
FOOD
January 16, 1992 | CHARLES PERRY
Big news? The biggest--possibly a permanent change in how we bake. Last year we read a story by Washington Post writer Sally Squires that struck us as totally bizarre: A paste of prunes, vanilla and water, she claimed, "is replacing high-fat shortening in a variety of commercially baked goods." She suggested cutting the fat content of brownies 75% by using this prune goop in place of butter. What crazy things health-foodies will eat, we thought. We passed the story around and snickered.
FOOD
September 16, 2009 | Noelle Carter
Dear SOS: I discovered the best currant scones at La Provence in Beverly Hills. Even the shape is special: free-form and crispy. Shirley Bilfield Century City Dear Shirley: Fan of currants? Then look no further! Each of these scones is packed with those tiny little raisins, so you can be sure every bite has an extra dose of tangy sweetness. They're great served with a little softened butter, honey or marmalade, and make the perfect quick breakfast. Black currant scones Total time: About 1 hour Servings: Makes 14 scones Note: Adapted from La Provence Cafe.
FOOD
August 5, 2009
As easy as 1, 2, 3, 4 Your basic American yellow cake is made from flour, sweetened with sugar, given structure with eggs, enriched and tenderized with butter, leavened with baking powder and flavored with vanilla and a little salt. You may have all the ingredients to make a cake on hand right now. The most common recipe is known as 1-2-3-4 cake, because it uses 1 cup each of milk and butter (that's two sticks of butter), 2 cups of sugar, 3 cups of flour and 4 eggs. (Actually, it also needs one-half teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon vanilla and 2 teaspoons of baking powder, so I suppose it's really the 1-2-3-4 plus 1/2 -1-2 cake.)
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