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Baking Soda

REAL ESTATE
July 15, 1990 | Produced by the Washington Energy Extension Service, a division of the Washington State Energy Office
Millions of pounds of household hazardous wastes end up in landfills each year. Products such as household cleaners, pesticides, motor oil and others can contaminate the water supply when improperly disposed. We hear a lot about avoiding toxic chemicals because they're harmful to our environment. But what are safer choices? The accompanying list shows nontoxic alternatives for paints, household cleaners and pesticides.
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FOOD
September 5, 1996 | MARION CUNNINGHAM
We all know California is a produce paradise. We have an abundance of berries, fruits and vegetables, and we cooks are indoctrinated with the philosophy of cooking with fresh everything. But the reality of what we cook in our kitchens doesn't always follow the ideal. We shop with budgets, and many home cooks can manage to shop for groceries only once a week. And we have to use our leftovers.
FOOD
July 14, 2012
Yeast-raised waffles Total time: About 40 minutes, plus overnight rising time Servings: Makes 16 waffles Note: Adapted from Marion Cunningham's recipe. 1 package active dry yeast 2 cups milk 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, melted 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sugar 2 cups flour 2 eggs 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1. Place one-half cup warm water in a large mixing bowl (the batter will double in volume), and sprinkle in the yeast.
FOOD
April 9, 1987
"I've had this recipe since September 1980," Marlyn Paul writes, "a friend I hadn't worked with since 1958 returned to work and gave this to me. We all love it. It's great for camp-outs and coffee mornings." LEMON YOGURT MUFFINS 1 (8-ounce) carton lemon yogurt 1/3 cup butter or margarine, melted 2 cups buttermilk baking mix 1/4 cup sugar 1 egg, beaten 1/2 teaspoon baking soda In bowl combine lemon yogurt, melted butter, buttermilk baking mix, sugar, egg and baking soda.
FOOD
June 12, 1986 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: Could you please tell me how to cook rhubarb so it will not fall to pieces? I like the way they cook it at Knott's Berry Farm. Answer: The secret is to cook rhubarb just until tender. This takes only a few minutes, as instructed in the Cherry Rhubarb Sauce recipe from "Knott's Berry Farm Cookbook" (Armstrong: 1975). The word cherry refers to the rhubarb's red color, rather than another fruit.
FOOD
August 22, 1985
"I copied this recipe from my mother's recipe box when I left home to attend college," Adriana Molinaro writes. "Hours of studying and feeling homesick often triggered the craving for a peanut butter cookie that only these special cookies could completely satisfy. The peanut butter filling adds the special burst of flavor that a true peanut butter fan can sincerely appreciate."
FOOD
December 11, 1986
"This is a favorite recipe of my whole family for the holidays," Ester Derkez of Wisconsin writes. "Everyone that's ever had it has loved it." PUMPKIN BARS 4 eggs 1 cup oil 2 1/4 cups sugar 1 (16-ounce) can pumpkin 2 cups flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup chopped nuts, optional Cream Cheese Frosting Beat eggs, oil and sugar. Mix in pumpkin, then flour, salt, cinnamon and baking soda. Stir in nuts. Pour into greased 17x11-inch baking pan.
FOOD
February 19, 1997 | DONNA DEANE, TIMES TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR
A crunchy oat topping adds fiber, texture and flavor to this baked apple dish. Butter is kept to a minimum by adding canola oil to the streusel-like topping. The apples are cut into wedges rather than thin slices so they won't cook down to a mush while baking. A touch of lemon juice is stirred into the apples to keep them from turning brown. No additional sugar is needed in the apples because there's enough sweetness in the topping.
FOOD
July 15, 1998 | RUSS PARSONS
Some recipes come in a flash. Others take a little longer. I've been working on this one for more than a year. Then again, usually when I'm developing a recipe, it's for work. This one was a labor of love. For some time now, it has been my habit to rise early on the weekend, walk the dogs and read the paper in the garden over a cup of coffee. Thus civilized, I'm able to mix up a batch of pancake batter, which is usually just about when my wife wakes up.
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