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Balad Iraq

NATIONAL
August 23, 2009 | Washington Post
The U.S. military has agreed for the first time to provide information to the International Committee of the Red Cross about prisoners held in secret detention camps in Afghanistan and Iraq, but it will continue to deny the organization access to them, military officials said Saturday. The facilities are "short-term places" operated by U.S. Special Forces for newly captured suspected insurgents considered to have valuable information or to be serious threats, according to an official familiar with the subject who was not authorized to discuss it on the record.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2004 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
In civilian life, Michael Ottolini loved driving big Peterbilt trucks and hauling hay. But the Sebastopol, Calif., truck driver was happiest, relatives said, when he was called up for active duty with the California Army National Guard. Ottolini, 45, a married father of two grown children, was killed Wednesday when the military truck he was driving was struck by a roadside bomb near Balad, Iraq, 50 miles northwest of Baghdad.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
An Army captain investigated for allegedly ordering his troops to kill suspected Iraqi insurgents in retaliation for a deadly U.S. base attack will not be prosecuted, Army officials said Friday. A prosecutor last month said he submitted three pages of possible charges against Capt. Matthew Cunningham, including solicitation of murder and involuntary manslaughter, and was waiting on his superiors to file charges. But 10 days later, Staff Sgt.
OPINION
January 28, 2007 | Austin Bay
PRIESTS, PROSTITUTES, psychologists, cops, jazz musicians, poker players. Every trade has its jargon and "insider lingo." Soldier slang, however, has a peculiar appeal. That's understandable. Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor -- physically, emotionally and psychologically. War reveals humankind at its best and its worst, and war-fighter slang, reflects the bitter, terrifying, sometimes inspiring hell of it.
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