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Balance Of Trade

BUSINESS
July 2, 1988 | BILL SING
The dollar, after three years of decline, appears to finally be stabilizing, thanks to recent drops in the U.S. trade deficit. That, experts say, is good news for stock and bond investors. This past week, the greenback hit a six-month high against the Japanese yen and also gained relative to the West German mark. While few predict that the U.S. currency will rise much further, many experts now say that at least its massive drops may be finally over. The key to a stable dollar "is that the U.S.
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NEWS
April 26, 1987 | BOB SECTER and JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writers
Guzzling beers down at the Flat Iron Cafe--in the very shadow of the hulking, long-shuttered Youngstown Sheet & Tube steel mill--the men who tended the furnaces and poured molten metal still puzzle over the rapid demise of an industry that once epitomized American economic might. "I'm not bitter at Japan," said retired mill hand Red Windwood, when asked about the flood of cheap steel imports that has killed the once-thriving steel industry in the Mahoning Valley.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top Bush Administration official warned Wednesday that Japan can expect tough action from the United States later this year if it fails to live up to provisions of a bilateral trade pact signed earlier this month. Speaking to electronics industry executives at an Irvine luncheon, Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher predicted that the U.S. trade deficit will fall below $100 billion this year for the first time in seven years. The nation's trade gap hit $113.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
When Ohio sheep farmer Joe Hixenbaugh ordered some grazing fences and gates from Kenneth Townsend's small livestock equipment-manufacturing company here a few months ago, he confidently expected that the goods would arrive within a few days. No such luck. After weeks of waiting, Townsend officials finally confessed that it might be several months before the gates would be finished--because they couldn't get the structural steel to make them.
NEWS
January 21, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and Toyota Motor Corp. Chairman Eiji Toyoda on Monday appeared to edge away from what seemed to be commitments to buy more American autos and auto parts, setting off acrimonious debate and new accusations of duplicity in the United States.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1991 | George White, Times staff writer. President Bush last week said he is leaning toward seeking one-year renewal of China's most-favored-nation status, which would keep tariffs on Chinese products as low as those for most other U.S. trade partners. and The United States has a mounting trade deficit with China--the third largest after Japan and Taiwan. Contending that the trade imbalance is the result of unfair Chinese trade practices--while also citing human rights problems in China--some members of Congress plan to seek votes for legislation that would eliminate China's MFN status. Times staff writer George White sought the views of two analysts on the economic ramifications of the controversy
Richard Brecher, director of business advisory services for the U.S.-China Business Council, a Washington-based group representing American firms with financial interests in China: If the MFN is not extended, the (American) business community would be damaged in a myriad of ways. If you're an exporter and you're selling to China, it's most likely that China would retaliate against U.S. products.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The strongest evidence of damage from the Asian economic crisis emerged last week in the form of a record U.S. trade deficit, but the shipping world didn't need to be told: It has been turned on its head by Asia's woes. Much as U-Haul trailers from Los Angeles stacked up in Seattle during the early 1990s flight from California, thousands of empty shipping containers are piling up at Long Beach, Los Angeles and other West Coast ports because of plummeting Asian demand for U.S.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1989 | from Associated Press
The United States, Japan and West Germany--the world's largest trading nations--all showed a big increase in the value of their exports during the first half of this year compared with 1988, the International Monetary Fund reported Sunday. West Germany's exports increased from $159.1 billion to $169.1 billion; the United States' rose from $157.6 billion to $182.7 billion; and Japan's went up from $125.3 billion to $135 billion, the IMF said. At the same time, West German imports rose from $124.
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