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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2010
I spent a recent rainy afternoon watching the Los Angeles Ballet rehearse "Balanchine -- See the Music, Hear the Dance." It was a privilege to observe these artists up close in their rehearsal studio in West L.A. I could feel the energy in the room the minute I arrived. The program, led by artistic directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary, will be performed at various locations through March 6. www.losangelesballet.org -- Paul Rogers
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
This review has been updated. See below for details. Los Angeles Ballet's Balanchine Festival continues with three stirring modern masterworks, two of which highlight the brilliant outputs of double giants of the last century. That duo would be George Balanchine, co-founder of New York City Ballet, and composer Igor Stravinsky, who forged a friendship and working relationship based on mutual admiration. Their rare collaborations of new dance to new score netted breakthrough ballets, an organic meeting of genius.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
To watch New York City Ballet dance an all-Balanchine program is to be in exactly the right place at precisely the right time. Wagner at Bayreuth is supposed to be like this, and Moliere at the Comedie Francaise, but Balanchine died only three years ago so his creative vision remains potent in the ensemble he honed. Arguably that vision is embodied at its purest, most concentrated and revolutionary in the three ballets presented Friday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2013 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Maria Tallchief, one of the first great stars of American ballet, who grew up on an Oklahoma Indian reservation and became an artistic inspiration for renowned choreographer George Balanchine, has died. She was 88. Tallchief, who was married to Balanchine for several years, died Thursday in Chicago, said her daughter, poet Elise Paschen. The cause of death was not disclosed. A ballerina of electrifying intensity and great speed, Tallchief was one of five Oklahoma-born dancers of Native American heritage to rise to prominence about the same time.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Capably staged and coached, the all-Balanchine program by Ballet du Capitole de Toulouse suffered from consistent miscasting in the company's last performance at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts on Thursday. Not bad dancing, but the right moves by the wrong people. Evelyne Spagnol, for instance, is a spirited, authoritative artist with physical proportions that make her unsuited for tutu roles. Classicism (and neoclassicism) can be cruel--less about steps than about idealized shapes.
MAGAZINE
March 26, 1989
Imagine what the entertainment industry and the world of classical ballet would be without the male klutzes who drip pools of sweat onto the floors of dance studios across the country. Should I start a list? Gregory Hines, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Fred Astaire, Ray Bolger, Balanchine. . . . JIM STARRETT Venice
NEWS
January 8, 2004
After reading Toni Bentley's well-written article about Robert Altman's film "The Company" ("A Picture of Passion," Jan. 1), I was expecting to see something cheesy, like "Flashdance." Instead I saw a film that succeeds wherever Bentley said it fails. A second reading of her article revealed her to be merely promoting her own view of ballet as a Balanchine-only world. In a Balanchine world, all the ballerinas are of a certain height and build. Thankfully, the Joffrey Ballet never succumbed to that narrow view of the universe.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Tulsa Ballet Theatre is an authentic mom-and-pop business: an ensemble created 30 years ago by Moscelyne Larkin and Roman Jasinski (of the Original Ballet Russe and Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo) that currently features their son and daughter-in-law as principal dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL
Onstage at the War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco Ballet is in the last moments of its 56th repertory season. And what ballet finale could be more celebratory than the end of George Balanchine's "Symphony in C" with something like 40 dancers deployed in brilliant formal cascades of classicism? Just ahead lies one of the biggest challenges of the year: an engagement from May 18-25 at the Festival de Paris. The invitation came two years ago and the company estimates it will cost $250,000 to accept.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music/Dance Critic
Maurice Bejart has never paid a great deal of attention, much less respect, to tippy-toe tradition with his Ballet of the 20th Century. His ballerinas don't spend much time modeling tutus, and they certainly don't worry much about the niceties of impersonating swooning swans, pretty peasants or pallid princesses. That hardly prevents Bejart, however, from casting a satirical or demeaning glance, from time to time, in the direction of the hoary conventions he has scorned.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Susan Josephs
This story has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. Colleen Neary will never forget the day when George Balanchine articulated the blueprint for her life's work. She was in her early 20s, then a respected New York City Ballet dancer. "He put me in to teach company class," she says. "He said to me, 'This is what you will do in the future.' I said I wanted to dance, but he said, 'You won't dance forever. You will teach dancers my ballets. " Fast forward to 2013, to a rehearsal of Balanchine's 1941 "Concerto Barocco" at the Westside headquarters of Los Angeles Ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By Victoria Looseleaf, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Three couples are negotiating a series of head-to-head moves, rapid-fire turns and daring leaps to cranked-up tango music of Astor Piazzolla. At first glance they could be contestants in a postmodern dance marathon. In reality, they are rehearsing a new piece for Los Angeles Ballet's final program of its fourth season. The beneficent task mistress calling the shots is choreographer Sonya Tayeh, the heavily tattooed 33-year-old known for her work on Fox's hit television show "So You Think You Can Dance."
IMAGE
February 28, 2010 | Ellen Olivier, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The After-School All-Stars — a tax-exempt group founded by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the early 1990s to provide tutoring, recreation and other programs for poor children — has now grown to provide after-school programs for 81,000 middle and high school students at 450 campuses around the country. And Schwarzenegger continues to support the organization. Speaking at the Feb. 18 "Reaching for the Stars" gala at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, he said, "I will always be part of raising the money … organizing and helping the committee and promoting it nationwide."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2010
I spent a recent rainy afternoon watching the Los Angeles Ballet rehearse "Balanchine -- See the Music, Hear the Dance." It was a privilege to observe these artists up close in their rehearsal studio in West L.A. I could feel the energy in the room the minute I arrived. The program, led by artistic directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary, will be performed at various locations through March 6. www.losangelesballet.org -- Paul Rogers
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008 | Debra Levine, Levine is a freelance writer.
"She's a snake," says former ballerina Yvonne Mounsey, describing the Siren in George Balanchine's 1929 ballet "Prodigal Son," a role that ranks as classical ballet's most fearsome dominatrix. In 1950, Balanchine restaged the work for New York City Ballet and cast Mounsey as the cool man-crusher he had created in retelling the New Testament parable about an errant youth. She was an early version of a female archetype he would return to again and again. "The Siren is an evil, alluring seductress.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2007 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
As Los Angeles Ballet moves into its second season, it has announced that the mostly Balanchine repertoire of its inaugural year will expand to include new works by three Southern California choreographers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music/Dance Critic
Earlier last week, the Lyons Opera Ballet jolted us with Maguy Marin's bleak, controversial doll-house version of "Cinderella." Saturday the company dropped its other slipper, as it were, with a very mixed mixed bill. The program, an obvious effort to demonstrate the diversity of neo-Gallic trendiness, surveyed four modern idioms. It may be significant that only one installment emanated from France.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1986 | LIANNE STEVENS
If she hadn't found theater such a comfort during her nomadic childhood, Anne Bogart might have been a choreographer. "I always directed theater, since I was a little girl. I'm from the Navy, which means we moved every year. I actually lived in San Diego when I was 4," the 34-year-old New Yorker said. She was enjoying a sunny midwinter morning in La Jolla, soaking up the warmth from a granite sculpture on the grassy UCSD campus.
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